Cameroon

Situation Report

Highlights

  • NORTH-WEST AND SOUTH-WEST SITUATION REPORT
  • Attacks on education actors by non-state armed groups have been reported in the North-West and South-West regions for participating in the general certificate exams.
  • In total 245,911 people received food security assistance in the North-West and South-West regions in August 2020.
  • During August 10,249 patients, 5 percent of whom live with disabilities, received life-saving primary healthcare from mobile clinics funded by CERF.
  • 567 Gender Based Violence (GBV) incidents were reported, with survivors receiving assistance, in August 2020 in the two regions.
Source: OCHA
The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

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Cameroon

Situation Report

Key Figures

3M
Affected people in NWSW
1.4M
Targeted for assistance in NWSW
679K
Internally displaced (IDP) from NWSW
204K
Returnees (former IDP) in NWSW
59K
Cameroonian refugees in Nigeria

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Situation Report

Funding

$390.9M
Required
$155.3M
Received
40%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Carla Martinez

Head of Office

James Nunan

Head of Sub-Office North-West and South-West regions

Jean-Sébastien Munie

Head of Sub-Office, Far-North region

Marie Bibiane Mouangue

Public information Officer

Cameroon

Situation Report
Visual

Map of IDP, Returnees and Refugees from the North-West and South-West Regions of Cameroon

Map of IDP, Returnees and Refugees from the North-West and South-West Regions of Cameroon

Source: OCHA, UNHCR, IOM

The boundaries and names shown, and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

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Cameroon

Situation Report
Background

Situation Overview

The situation in the North-West and South-West (NWSW) regions of Cameroon deteriorated in August compared to the previous three months with an upsurge in violence and attacks against civilians. Non -State armed groups (NSAGs) have increased the use of improvised explosive devices (IEDs) with increasing numbers of civilian casualties. The deteriorating security situation has resulted in multiple population displacements across the NWSW with over 11,718 people forced to flee their homes to seek shelter in nearby bushes and villages. The NW region has been more affected with over 10,200 displaced people. These movements are often temporary and the displaced return to their homes once the security situation allows.

Attacks on education continued this month as NSAGs attempted to prevent teachers and students taking part in the general certificate education examination (GCE). On 10 August, armed men killed a teacher in Nkwen, Bamenda (Mezam division) and threw his body in a river. On 11 August, NSAG attempted to abduct a student returning from writing the GCE in Bamenda. She was shot in the leg as she escaped.

The month of August was marked by increased targeting of humanitarians by NSAGs hampering the ability of organisations to provide life-saving services. On 5 August, NSAGs interrupted a food distribution at a site in the Muyuka subdivision (SW) and a beneficiary was injured by a gunshot. Later that same day, two aid workers were shot in the legs and arms by NSAGs in the Muyuka subdivision. On 7 August, a humanitarian aid worker working for a local NGO in Batibo subdivision, was abducted from his home and later killed allegedly by NSAG fighters. On 18 and 19 August, an aid organization in Kupe-Muanenguba (SW) was sealed by the Divisional Officer (administrative authority) and the Commissioner for public security and three staff of the organization were held in overnight detention. On 27 August, NSAG fighters abducted four staff of an aid organization at Kurabi (Batibo subdivision, Momo division). The Humanitarian Coordinator ad interim issued an statement on 8 August condemning the killing of the aid worker. This incident happened barely a month after the killing of a community health worker in the South-West. The Humanitarian Coordinator called all armed actors to refrain from any attacks or obstruction of aid workers and humanitarian agencies on whose assistance so many lives depend. OCHA has continued to advocate for humanitarian access.

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Situation Report
Coordination

Humanitarian Coordination

OCHA continued to provide leadership in the response in the NWSW through the organization of regular meetings of the Inter-Cluster, Humanitarian Coordination Forum (HCF), Access Working Group and Information Management Working Group. World Humanitarian Day was celebrated on 19 August. OCHA organized events in Bamenda (NW) and Kumba and Mamfe (SW). A social media campaign also conducted by OCHA for the celebration gave tribute to humanitarian workers nominated by their peers and organizations.

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Cameroon

Situation Report
Visual

Cameroon 2020 NW-SW Crisis - Funding by sector (in million US$) as of 31 August, 2020

Cameroon 2020 NW-SW Crisis

All humanitarian partners, including donors and recipient agencies, are encouraged to inform OCHA's Financial Tracking Service (FTS - http://fts.unocha.org) of cash and in-kind contributions by e-mailing: fts@un.org

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Situation Report
Trends
learners assisted

Humanitarian Response: Education

The national reopening of schools, including in the NWSW, is scheduled for 5 October 2020. Schools have been closed since 18 March to contain the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic. In preparation of schools reopening, education cluster partners were able to support learning of 32,222 conflict and COVID-19 affected children (15,545 boys and 16,677 girls) in the NWSW through distance learning, provision of psychosocial support and provision of water and sanitation in schools and learning centres. This also includes access to education for 3,894 children (1,716 boys and 2,178 girls) affected by the dual emergencies of conflict and COVID-19 through e-learning and radio programme in both regions.

Education authorities continued preparing children who were sitting for general certificate examinations (GCE) amidst increased risks and threats from NSAGs to students and teachers. These attacks are expected to rise in the weeks before and after school reopening, based on previous trends. The education cluster, with the support of OCHA, is scaling up efforts in advance of the start of the school year to depoliticize education and ensure that all sides in the crisis refrain from using learning as a political tool in the crisis. Cluster partners are also exploring safer learning modalities that reduce the exposure of children and teachers to the risk of attacks.

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Situation Report
Trends
Food assistance

Humanitarian Response: Food Security

The food security situation in the NWSW remains precarious. The cluster is prioritizing resource mobilization and a modality shift from in-kind to cash programming where possible. As of August 2020, 29 partners collectively assisted 245,911 people in the NWSW regions. This figure represents an 8 percent decrease compared to the 269,179 people assisted in July. The decrease is mainly due to the end of projects of two key partners. Around 90 percent of the total beneficiaries received food assistance either through in-kind or cash/voucher modalities. 66 percent of beneficiaries were in the NW. A total of 5 partners reported having implemented COVID-19 support activities. The COVID-19 situation has had a huge impact on the logistics and supply chain involved in distributing in-kind support. Hence, several food security partners have been exploring the possibility of shifting to cash. The cash working group has engaged with the local government in the regions to ensure that partners shifting to cash do not face any bureaucratic challenges. The government has emphasized the need for transparency and sharing of reports to ensure that cash is delivered to the targeted households and not diverted. The food security cluster continues to hold its regular online coordination meetings and technical working groups on food assistance and agriculture/livelihoods to specifically discuss issues around harmonization of relief packages.

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Situation Report
Trends
health

Humanitarian Response: Health

All health districts in the NWSW regions have started testing for COVID-19. 28 out of the 37 health districts in the NWSW have confirmed at least one case of COVID-19. Mass screening campaigns are ongoing in the health districts for early detection, isolation, and treatment of cases to break the chain of transmission. A relaxation in the implementation of preventive measures such as the use of face masks and social distancing has been observed in public spaces. Mass sensitization campaigns are ongoing in both regions to raise awareness and counter the widespread misinformation about COVID-19 in the regions. WHO organized a workshop from 4 to 7 August on mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) in the management of COVID-19 in the NW region. The 19 health districts of the NW and medical personnel from key health facilities took part in the workshop in Bamenda.

Health cluster partners, despite the unpredictable and volatile atmosphere in August, were able to provide life-saving essential health services in Fako, Meme, Ndian, Kupe-Manenguba, Manyu, Mezam, Boyo, Ngoketunjia, Bui, and Momo divisions in NWSW. Mobile clinics operated by Reach Out and CARITAS, partners of WHO, have been the main source of primary health care in most of the affected communities in 10 divisions where they have been operating since 1 July 2019 The 16 mobile clinic teams will conclude operations in these communities at the end of September 2020 due to the exhaustion of CERF funds despite the continuing needs.

In August, these clinics were able to consult 10,249 patients. Over 5 percent of the patients consulted were people living with disabilities. Mobile clinics placed 48 patients on anti-retroviral treatment and sensitized 35,863 persons on epidemic-prone diseases, sexually transmitted infections and non-communicable diseases like diabetes and hypertension. The clinical psychologists deployed by WHO and mobile clinics provided psychosocial support to 104 persons. The trauma surgeons deployed by WHO and the mobile clinic teams performed 162 surgical procedures.

UNICEF through its implementing partners CARITAS and CBCHS continued the provision of life-saving services to IDPs and conflict-affected populations living in hard to reach 7 divisions of the NWSW despite security and COVID-19 challenges. A total of 13,668 children aged between 6-59 months were vaccinated with routine vaccines. 985 children were treated for simple malaria and acute respiratory tract infections. Some 2,419 households received mosquito nets and 998 pregnant women received tetanus and diphtheria vaccines, out of which 812 received iron supplementation, and 144 received intermittent preventive treatment for malaria prevention. A total of 170 healthcare facility staff and community health workers were trained on infection prevention and control (IPC), 172 handwashing equipment stations were installed in the community and immunization centers and 121 people (leaders of the women group, religious, opinion, etc.) were engaged on COVID-19 through risk communication and community engagement (RCCE) actions.

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Situation Report
Trends
nutrition

Humanitarian Response: Nutrition

In August, 26,521 children under 5 years of age were screened for acute malnutrition with 110 (0.4 percent) identified with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and 323 (1.2 percent) children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM).94 children with SAM (85 percent) were supported with treatment, however 15 percent were not able to receive treatment as coverage and availability of SAM treatment is still low compared to the number of cases identified. The existing referral system still needs to be strengthened.

Under the preventive programme for malnutrition in food insecure areas, 11,230 children between 6-23 months and 6,931 pregnant and lactating women (PLW) were reached under the Blanket Supplementary Feeding Program (BSFP) implemented by WFP partners in the NWSW. Implementation was carried out by SHUMAS, Reach Out, SUDAHASER, INTERSOS, Action Against Hunger (AAH), CBCHS, COMINSUD, and CARITAS with resource support from UNICEF and WFP. In addition to the partner’s efforts, the two regional Delegations of public health organized activities in non-covered health facilities which is a new approach supported by UNICEF and WFP, as this increases the sustainability of the interventions.

COVID-19 preventive measures (including programmatic adaptations) were undertaken by partners to mitigate the spread of the disease. 10,841 persons were reached with information, education and communication (IEC) materials with COVID-19 messages specific on infant and young child feeding. COVID-19 modules (specific on nutrition) were integrated in the SAM management training conducted in Bamenda between 26 and 28 August. Insecurity continues to be a hinderance in the delivery of nutrition services across the regions. The training of additional 80 health workers on Integrated Management of Acute Malnutrition (IMAM) and BSFP, including programme adaptations related to COVID-19, will continue in September 2020. Also, a training for caregivers and community members on the use and provision of mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) tapes to caregivers will be initiated.

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Trends
protection

Humanitarian Response: Protection

The protection environment in the NWSW continued to deteriorate in August due to increasing insecurity with attacks on humanitarian workers, frequent clashes between NSAGs and government security forces as well as destruction of properties, killing and threats against the civilian population. In addition, the poor road network after heavy rains is making humanitarian access more difficult as the rainy season gets to its peak. 80 flash alerts (60 in the NW and 20 in the SW) and other significant incidents were reported in August, including homicides on civilians leaving community members in high protection risks and daily fear.

In August 2020, 579 protection incidents were recorded through the UNHCR and INTERSOS protection monitoring project in the NWSW regions. It should be noted that the incident reports collected each month refer to incidents which have happened at any time since the crisis began and are not indicative of any protection trends.

Protection Responses

184,627 individuals benefited from various protection responses in August, including protection monitoring conducted by DRC, INTERSOS and IRC. UNHCR and its partner Libra Law Office (LLO) assisted several cases with legal protection needs including support to obtain identity and civil status documentation, legal counselling and sensitization on the rights and responsibilities of stakeholders. Among those assisted with protection services 79 percent were women and girls, while 30 percent were children and 26 percent were 60-year-old and above. During the reporting period, 198 persons benefited from legal assistance (detention, civil status documents, legal GBV response), 161 women and girls with specific needs were supported by activities aiming to restore and sustain their dignity, including with cash assistances. 44 survivors benefited from psychosocial support while various advocacy actions were undertaken in the field.

About 40 humanitarian workers were trained on human rights/protection thematic areas and mainstreaming of protection while 2,327 persons were reached through sensitization and awareness raising on numerous themes including legal issues, social cohesion, GBV key concepts, protection and humanitarian principles, COVID-19 prevention and protective measures.

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Situation Report
Trends
protection (1)

Humanitarian Response: Child Protection Area of Responsibility

Despite the worsening security situation Child Protection (CP) Area of Responsibility (AoR) members, including UNICEF and their implementing partners, reached more than 29,000 children and caregivers with different child protection services in both affected regions. Child Protection AoR members continue to provide psychosocial services (PSS) to children and caregivers affected by the conflict and COVID-19, through different forms of child friendly and other safe spaces. During the reporting period, Child Protection actors were able to reach more than 9,200 children and caregivers via PSS. This number is consistent with the number of children and caregivers reached during July as some CP AoR members are implementing new approaches i.e. remote psychosocial support, to reach children and caregivers in need of PSS in hard to reach communities.

In response to COVID-19, Child Protection actors have sensitized more than 10,000 children and caregivers on the ways COVID-19 spreads and the related child protection risks and concerns. In addition, activities were undertaken to raise the community awareness on GBV and child protection issues and to build their capacity to respond accordingly.

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Situation Report
Trends
GBV

Humanitarian Response: GBV Area of Responsibility

The level of Gender Based Violence (GBV) incident reporting has remained stable with 567 cases reported in August compared to July 2020 (573 cases). However, as repeated armed confrontations in August caused new displacements, there is a high likelihood that more GBV cases were perpetrated than reported, as access to affected communities has been limited. Sexual violence represents 38 percent of the reported cases while survivors’ access to multi-sectoral response services remains a challenge. Survivors of GBV incidents are mostly women (78 percent). 4 percent of them are women with disabilities, and 25 percent are children. Survivors received various services including psychosocial support (40 percent), health (34 percent), livelihood services (25 percent) and legal assistance (16 percent). There is a critical need to scale up lifesaving GBV services and advocate for access to affected communities in hard to reach areas.

In August, the GBV AoR members were able to reach 37,969 people with GBV prevention and response interventions including: GBV and COVID-19 awareness raising and information on available services (12,088); dignity kits distribution (8,401); women and girl safe space activities (7,185); psychosocial support and psychological first aid (PFA) (4,057); men and boys engagement activities (2,409); youth and adolescent program (1,059); life skill development for women (994); capacity building for community members and frontline workers on GBV concepts (682). To support timely access of GBV survivors to multi-sector services, 15 organizations from the WASH cluster and 35 DTM focal points received an orientation and 95 copies of the GBV referral pathways. Enhancing GBV case management skills of frontline workers is key to the healing process of survivors of GBV as well as their recovery and empowerment.

Service providers need to be trained on GBV case management to be able to support survivors in the process of identifying and addressing their holistic needs. However, during a recent rapid assessment on the COVID-19 impact on GBV risks and response in the NWSW regions, 60 percent to 82 percent of respondents (service providers) stated they did not receive any training or orientation on psychosocial support and GBV case management. To address this need, the GBV AoR under UNFPA leadership trained 60 frontline GBV actors on GBV case management in the two regions. Recognizing the importance of these training sessions, GBV actors in the regions also expressed the need for more coaching and funding support to be able to address the holistic needs of GBV survivors including health, mental health and psychosocial support, safe shelter and socioeconomic empowerment and access to justice. It is important to note that these services are not always free for all the survivors in the conflict affected NWSW regions, discouraging most of the victims and their families from seeking support exacerbating the consequences of GBV on survivors and their families, and jeopardizing their resilience.

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Trends
shelter NFI

Humanitarian Response: Shelter/NFI

In the two regions 18,979 individuals (11,242 in the NW and 7,736 in the SW) from 1,805 households benefited from shelter cluster support in August 2020. In the SW, UNHCR and its partner Plan International assisted 536 households in Buea and Tiko (Fako division). These overcrowded households visibly needed more assistance in NFIs and Plan International will add to the number of NFI kits provided. IOM assisted 85 households in Kumba (SW) with shelter kits while 184 were assisted in the NW. NRC distributed 200 NFI kits in the Tubah subdivision of Mezam division (NW), reaching up to 1,280 individuals. Elsewhere, 800 households benefited from assistance in core relief items as Plan International carried out distributions in some highly affected communities in Bali (NW). Also, in the NW close to 8,613 persons were reached with core relief items (NFI) in villages such as Gungong, Mbufung, Jam Jam, Mbeluh/Medum, Mbadmande, Kopin, Bali Centre, Njenka all in Bali subdivision (Mezam).

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Situation Report
Trends
WASH (1)

Humanitarian Response: Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

In August 408,230 individuals received various WASH services including COVID-19 prevention activities implemented by seven WASH partners (H4BF, Plan International, NRC, SUDAHSER, CHAMEG, and EPDA and COMINSUD supported by UNICEF) in the NWSW. The total number of individuals reached in August was 72.55 percent of the number of people reached in July 2020. Lockdowns, harvest season and heavy rains affected effective implementation of some of the WASH activities like hygiene promotion and sensitization on COVID-19.

In terms of COVID-19 prevention, 200 handwashing stations were installed in strategic public areas like markets and bus stations in seven locations of Bamenda. More than 10,000 individuals are expected to benefit from the installed handwashing stations. The harvest season has caused the community to reduce attendance at hygiene promotion and sensitization sessions. To address this constraint, sensitization sessions are carried out very early in the morning. The first physical WASH cluster meetings since the outbreak of COVID-19 was held in the SW and NW regions on 20 and 27 August, respectively.

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Situation Report
Emergency Response
photo 2
Credit: UNICEF

COVID-19 Situation report - Countrywide

HIGHLIGHTS  

  • Between 1 and 14 October, the Cameroonian Ministry of Health recorded 406 new confirmed COVID-19 cases, bringing the total number to 21,203, including 423 deaths and 20,117 recoveries. An overall of 863 healthcare workers have been infected, including 20 deaths.

  • Rapid diagnostic tests continue to expand in the ten regions of the country with an average 2,098 tests performed daily.

  • Seven months after the construction of eight treatment centers over the country to manage COVID-19 cases, three makeshift hospitals are being dismantled in Yaoundé, Douala and Limbe.

  • Lack of facemasks, handwashing stations and sufficient physical distancing in schools in the North-West and South-West regions of Cameroon may expose students to COVID-19 contamination in the opening of the school year with the highest rate of attendance since 2017.

  • 21,4K COVID-19 cases

  • 494,9K Samples tested for COVID-19 (TDR+PCR)

  • 2% Fatality rate

  • 15 Laboratories for PCR testing available in nine regions

  • 10.8MT Material and equipment for care and prevention

SITUATION OVERVIEW 

As of 7 October, WHO reported 440,440 Rapid Diagnostic Tests (RDT) conducted in Cameroon in the last 210 days, including 7,048 positive samples. According to the organization, 2,098 RDT are performed daily in average country wide, with continuous expansion of RTD and PCR (Polymerase Chain Reaction) testing capacities in the ten regions. Fifteen laboratories are operational country wide for RDT whereas for PCR tests the South region needs to send the samples to the Centre region for analysis and results. Regarding the humanitarian staff, the United Nations clinic in Cameroon reported 104 cumulative cases among the UN personnel, dependents and NGO partners, including seven active cases – none of them severe – as of 7 October 2020. The COVID-19 center in the clinic is operational and facilitates PCR testing for UN and other humanitarian staff since 3 September to ensure timely response activities in the field. As the number of COVID-19 infection cases declines, the Government of Cameroon dismantled three makeshift hospitals in Douala’s Mbappe Leppe stadium (Littoral region), in Limbe Middle Farms stadium (South-West region) and in Yaoundé Ngoa-Ekellé stadium (Centre region), among the eight COVID-19 treatment centers constructed to give an adequate and timely response in all the regions. Center and Littoral regions remain the most affected by the pandemic with the highest number of new positive cases among the population as well as medical staff. The main objective of the 2020/2021 school year was to encourage children to resume classes over the country, amidst COVID-19 crisis. In a report published in August 2019, UNICEF revealed that 80 per cent of schools had closed in the North-West and South-West regions since the beginning of the crisis, preventing over 3,000 students to attend classes. According to the Governor of the North-West region in an interview given on 7 October 2020, both the North-West and South-West regions have recorded the highest rate of school attendance since 2017. This auspicious reopening of schools was however hampered by the neglect of prevention measures: Children were admitted in classrooms without masks and schools do not have handwashing devices. UNICEF donated handwashing stations for schools in the North-West and South-West regions to support the Government’s “Back to School campaign without COVID-19”. Yet regional delegations for education in these areas face financial hardship to transport the material to various localities where schools have reopened

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Situation Report
Visual

Inter-Agency Response Plan/Cameroon HRP COVID 2020

Cameroon HRP COVID 2020

US$ 81.7 million requested US$ 38.6 million funded /All humanitarian partners, including donors and recipient agencies, are encouraged to inform OCHA's Financial Tracking Service (FTS - http://fts.unocha.org) of cash and in-kind contributions by e-mailing: fts@un.org

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Situation Report
Emergency Response

Infection, prevention and control

Needs:

  • Reinforcement of hygiene in sensitive public places like schools and screening/treatment centers with WASH kits and sensitization boards.

Response:

  • On 1 and 2 October 2020, the regional delegation of public health of the West region donated handwashing stations and personal protective equipment to reinforce the prevention in maternity wards of three health facilities in Bafoussam regional hospital, Kongso medical center and Dschang district hospital.

  • International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies held on 8 October 2020 an open webinar on home care and isolation in the context of COVID-19.

  • WHO, with the support of Agence Française pour le Développement (AFD) supported the Ministry of Health with the organization of five training workshops on COVID-19 community-based surveillance, contact tracing, rapid response and investigation, as well as data management, from 16 to 30 September 2020 in Douala. This training targeted 345 actors of the COVID-19 response in the nine most affected health districts of the city.

Gaps and constraints:

  • Insufficient/lack of WASH infrastructure (water points, latrines, etc.) in schools and screening/treatment centers.

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Emergency Response

Risk Communication and Community Engagement (RCCE)

Needs:

  • Production of COVID-19 communication materials for people living with disabilities, especially the visually and hearing impaired.

Response:

  • International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies (IFRC) published on 5 October 2020, the report of its Coronavirus Knowledge, Attitudes and Practices (KAP) survey administered to internally displaced persons and host populations in the Maya-Sava and Mayo Tsanaga divisions, Far-North region. According to the report, 71 per cent of respondents know that COVID-19 is a very dangerous disease, yet only 45 per cent believe they could contract it.

  • As of 5 October, IFRC and other RCCE partners reached 5,650,000 teachers, students and parents through awareness campaigns on local community radio for a school year without COVID-19 and approximately over 1,740,000 school personnel have been sensitized by WHO and the Ministry of Health on compliance with barrier measures and handwashing through interactive programs on community radio stations in the Center, East, Littoral, North and West regions.

Gaps & Constraints:

  • Reinforce awareness activities in communities and remote areas where people believe children cannot be infected with the virus.

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Emergency Response

Points of Entry (POE); Operational Support and Logistics

At country-level, 3,926 people out of 5,926 passengers from air and land transport means were screened with rapid diagnostic tests at POE by health sector partners between 1 to 7 October 2020, with zero positive cases.

Response:  

  • The Far North Regional Delegation of Public Health started setting up eight tents donated by the Government of Sweden as a contribution to the COVID-19 response. Six tents have already been installed so far in the region despite bad weather conditions and insufficient or adequate space.

  • The medical logistics manager deployed by WFP has begun training of health staff in the Littoral region on the use of mobile tents and medical stores from the Swedish donation. These training sessions will extend to health personnel in the Far North and East regional delegations of Public Health.

Gaps & Constraints:  

  • The reopening of land borders between Cameroon and Chad at the Kousseri/ N’Djamena cross point remains a collective concern for humanitarian staff. The closure of this crossing point keeps humanitarian staff enclaved in Kousseri now that the UNHAS flight has resumed operations between Yaoundé and N’Djamena.

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Situation Report
Emergency Response

Socio-economic and humanitarian support

Needs:

  • Farmers, retailers and entrepreneurs, who represent a large segment of the vulnerable population, need to be financially supported in the economic recovery process post-COVID-19.

Response:

  • On 12 October, UNHCR and WFP released a report on the assessment of the socio-economic effects of COVID-19 on the food security and livelihoods of Central African refugees in the East region of Cameroon. The assessment was conducted from 6 to 22 May 2020 and revealed that if the restrictive measures due to COVID-19 became more severe, 61 per cent of the refugees planned to defy government bans to carry out their agricultural and economic activities, instead of dying of hunger.

  • On 5 October the Minister of Small and Medium Enterprises, Social Economy and Handicrafts of Cameroon launched the special post-COVID-9 economic recovery fund for Small and Medium-sized Enterprises (SMEs). An envelope of two billion CFA Francs will be distributed to SMEs promoters and craftsmen in the ten regions of the country to alleviate the socio-economic impact of the COVID-19 pandemic. This support intends to finance two activities: direct support for SMEs with high potential disaster (1.5 billion CFA Francs) and support for craftsmen, cooperative societies that manufacture homemade face masks and hydro-alcoholic gels (500 million CFA Francs).

Gaps and constraints:

  • Transparent management of the government’s financial support to businesses and enterprises to recover from the COVID-19 economic hardship will be required.

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