Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Highlights

  • With humanitarian needs rapidly increasing across Tigray, aid organizations continue to report major challenges to access the region and deliver life-saving assistance.
  • The last humanitarian convoy to enter Tigray with 50 trucks reached Mekelle on 12 July. Between 500 and 600 trucks with relief items are required every week to meet current needs.
  • An attack against a WFP-led convoy on 18 July further impacted operations and humanitarians’ capacity to reach 5.2 million people in desperate need of assistance.
  • Following Government’s authorization, the first UN Humanitarian Air Service flight arrived in Mekelle on 22 July, with passengers undergoing extensive search procedures.
  • The UN continues to engage with all parties and calls for unfettered access Northern Ethiopia, protection of civilians, aid workers and assets and to an end to the conflict.
Ethiopia
The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations. © OCHA

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Key Figures

5.2M
People in need
5.2M
People targeted
63,110
Refugees in Sudan since 7 November

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Funding

$854M
Requirements (May - December)
$435M
Outstanding gap (May - December)

URL:

Downloaded:

Contacts

Saviano Abreu

Public Information Officer

Peter Ekayu

Deputy Head of Office, OCHA Ethiopia

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report
Background

Disclaimer

This report is prepared by OCHA Ethiopia with the support of Cluster Coordinators. The data/information collected covers the period from 16 to 26 July. In some cases, access and communication constraints mean that updates for the period are delayed. The next issue of the sitrep will be published on 5 February.  

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report
Visual

Results from the Northern Ethiopia Response Plan (since 1 May)

Results from Northern Ethiopia Response Plan (since 1 May)

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report
Background

Situation Overview

With humanitarian needs rapidly increasing across Tigray, aid organizations continue to report major challenges to access the region and deliver life-saving assistance to more than 5.2 million in desperate need of support. The last humanitarian convoy to enter Tigray reached Mekelle on 12 July, while aid workers estimate that between 500 and 600 trucks with relief items (food, non-food, fuel) are needed every week to meet the needs of people impacted by the conflict.

All the main roads into Tigray from Amhara Region remain closed due to restrictions and insecurity related to ongoing fighting. In addition, the Tekeze Bridge between Shire and May Tsebri towns is currently not operational, as the rising water level destroyed the temporary repairs made on the bridge after its destruction in late June, isolating humanitarian operations in the refugee settlements from the rest of Tigray. 

The only possible road into Tigray, through Afar Region, has been inaccessible due to security concerns since 19 July, following an attack against a WFP convoy the day before. The 10-truck humanitarian convoy was moving to Mekelle when it was attacked in the north of Semera, in Afar. At least one truck was partially looted, and one truck driver was robbed of his personal belongings. By 24 July, another WFP-led convoy of over 200 trucks containing food and other essential humanitarian supplies was on standby in Semera and expected to depart for Tigray as soon as security clearances were assured.

Following authorization from the Federal Government, the first United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) passenger flight arrived in Mekelle on 22 July, after passengers were extensively searched in Addis Ababa, and following the removal of multiple items, including personal medicines and work-related equipment such as laptops and USB drives. The 34 aid workers on board, including UN personnel and INGO staff, were allowed by authorities to carry only a minimum amount of cash per passenger (around ETB10,000 or US$225), which will be insufficient to cover their personal expenses in Tigray. Some essential medicines, including anti-malaria, pain killers, heart and diabetes drugs were not allowed on the plane, leading two passengers who depend on them to stay behind. UNHAS is expected to run two flights a week from Addis Ababa to Mekelle, as commercial flights have been halted since 24 June, although no flights have yet received clearance from the Government since the first one on 22 July.

The banking system is still closed, impacting the restoration of other services and resumption to normalcy in Tigray. Salaries of public servants and some aid workers have not been paid for months, and the lack of cash prevents the scaling up of humanitarian operations.

More than 2.1 million people have been forced to flee their homes since the conflict began. Just over 46,500 people have sought international asylum and protection in Sudan, while more than 2.1 million internally displaced people have been registered across more than 380 sites in Tigray and the neighbouring regions of Afar and Amhara. Recently, armed clashes have also displaced thousands of people in the Afar Region to the east and where an additional 55,000 Eritrean refugees are hosted. There are reports of armed confrontations close to the locations where they live.

Although security inside much of Tigray has relatively improved over the last week—with fighting moving towards the neighbouring regions—humanitarians on the ground have reported increasing concerns on the safety of Eritrean refugees in Tigray and Ethiopian refugees in Sudan, given the proximity to the fighting areas. An estimated 24,000 Eritrean refugees in Mai Aini and Adi Harush camps in Tigray’s Mai Tsebri area are facing intimidation and harassment and living in constant fear, cut off from humanitarian assistance, according to UNHCR. The agency, which lost access to the refugees since mid-July, received disturbing and credible reports in recent days from Mai Aini camp that at least one refugee was killed by armed elements operating inside the camp. This latest death is in addition to the killing of another refugee on 14 July. 

Humanitarians in Tigray and other parts of Ethiopia are also facing increasing threats and security risks, due to false accusations of favouring one party to the conflict. This is increasing challenges to humanitarian operations, hampering life-saving assistance and services. The UN and partners in Ethiopia continue to engage with all parties to the conflict to advocate for unfettered access to all regions of Tigray and neighboring areas, while calling on them to honour their obligations to protect civilians and humanitarian workers and assets.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report
Visual

Humanitarian Access in Tigray

Access Map - Tigray Region

The boundaries and names shown and the designations used on this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations. © OCHA

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report
Emergency Response

Humanitarian Preparedness and Response

As a result of the access restrictions, humanitarian operations in Tigray are facing challenges to reach all people in need of assistance and prevent large-scale loss of life. Humanitarians only have left few days worth of food supplies in Tigray to feed less than 2 million people, at a moment where more than 5.2 million people are severely-food insecure, including nearly 400,000 in famine-like conditions. Nutrition partners will soon run out of the essential Ready to Use Formula (RUTF) need to treat an estimated 4,000 severely-malnourished children per month. Lack of stocks, fuel and communication equipment is expected to effectively halt humanitarian response in two weeks. 

The lack of fuel is also impacting the response. The humanitarian community in Tigray needs at least 200,000 litres of fuel (4-5 tankers) weekly to enable operations to continue. Health assistance has been particularly affected, as mobile health teams are currently not able to operate without fuel, impacting vaccinations and other life-saving services. Around 300 water schemes dependent on fuel will be non-functional, impacting access to safe water for up to 450,000 people. 

Despite challenges, aid organizations continue to work to save lives in Tigray. Nearly 5 million people received food assistance since the conflict in Tigray started, around 110,000 over the last week alone. Humanitarians have provided some 620,000 people with emergency shelter and non-food item (NFI) support. More than 630,000 people have received clean water through water trucking, and 55 mobile health and nutrition teams are providing services in 57 woredas. About 42,000 people were reached with psychosocial support activities in 11 woredas, while nearly 39,900 have received dignity kits support in 10 woredas.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Agriculture

Needs

  • With millions of people severely food insecure and hundreds of thousands facing famine-like conditions, support with agriculture inputs will be crucial to contain the hunger crisis and prevent a long-term catastrophe. In Tigray, most people depend on subsistence agriculture to survive.   

  • Although the meher planting season normally closes by the third week of July 2021, this year’s delayed commencement of the rains presents a tight window of opportunity for the provision of inputs to farmers. 

  • With the latest findings on food insecurity, relatively increased access inside Tigray and possible returns, the Cluster is revising its targets from the initial 250,000 families to over 550,000 families, to cover the population facing severe hunger (IPC 3 and above). 

  • These families need short maturing live-saving crop inputs, including vegetables seeds, in addition to support to irrigation production, livestock vaccination, feed and poultry production, to facilitate own food production and income generation.

Response

  • About,980.5 quintals (a quintal equals 100kg) of fertilizer was delivered to woredas and distribution to farmer is ongoing. 

  • The Agriculture Cluster is still following up with the Logistics Cluster on the transportation seeds and fertilizers to the most affected 11 woredas in the Central and Eastern zones as there is window of opportunity of one week to deliver these inputs before the end of the planting season.

  • Livestock vaccination campaign is ongoing and vaccines to inoculate 450,000 animals have been delivered to 10 woredas during the past week. This brings the total vaccine distribution to woredas to a total of 768,700.

Gaps

  • The disruption of essential services including electricity, telephone, banking and fuel shortages are expected to slow the response.

  • There are fuel and cash limitations in transporting the agricultural inputs to the woredas.

  • Twenty-two trucks carrying seeds are stuck in Afar and the transportation of an additional 4,400 kilograms of vegetable seeds is suspended. These seeds were to be planted immediately to take advantage of the remaining rainy season in July to August.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Camp Coordination and Camp Management

Needs

  • More than 2 million people have been forced to flee their homes since the conflict began and are now sheltering in over 380 different sites across Tigray, Amhara and Afar regions, in addition to those who crossed the border into Sudan.  

  • Humanitarians on the ground reported harsh and inadequate living conditions in the sites, with limited access to basic services, including food, water and sanitation facilities. The constrained supply pipelines—due to challenges to access Tigray from other parts of Ethiopia—and disruption of electricity is driving a significant reduction in water, food and cooking fuel across most sites hosting internally displaced people. 

Response

  • An intention survey was carried out in Mekelle and Shire among displaced communities. Enumerators from seven agencies participated in the intention survey. Analysis of the collected data is ongoing.  Intention surveys have also been planned in Adigrat, Abi Adi, Axum, Sheraro and Adwa.

  • Support has been expanded by the Cluster to implement key CCCM activities in Adwa, Axum, Sheraro, Adi-Daero, and Endaba-Guna. 

  • Awareness raising and consultation with Mekelle IDP representative on Sabacare 4 developments was conducted on 18 July. A site visit with Mekelle Mayor was planned for 22 July with an IDP go-and-see visit planned soon after.

  • A CCCM capacity building orientation session was conducted for 22 outreach workers in Mekelle. Ten outreach workers are deployed in seven collective centres of Mekelle with remaining to be deployed to support the collective centres in Adigrat and Edaga Hamus Town. 

  • A CCCM partner has distributed chairs, tables, COVID-19 protective personnel equipment, stationary and 100 vests for community policing in Shire IDP sites.

Gaps

  • Government counterpart for CCCM Cluster and focal point for Sabacare 4 has not yet been identified.

  • Support is required from cluster’s partners in terms of enumerators and vehicles for the intention surveys. 

  • Fuel shortage are impacting the mobility of partners to support the displaced in the collective centres. 

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Education

Needs

  • Hundreds of thousands of children are in need of protective services and safe education in Tigray and neighbouring areas, as the conflict disrupted their learning process. An estimated 25 per cent of schools in Tigray have been damaged, according to the Ministry of Education. Increasing food insecurity is also considered a barrier to continuing education, according to the Education Cluster.

  • Alternative shelters have to be identified to allow some 86 schools used as shelters to be cleaned, sanitized and prepared for school reopening.

  • Enhance community mobilization endeavours to realize school reopening in September in the whole Tigray 

  • Mobilize resources like scholastic material and recreational material to schools to minimize parents’ expense for allowing children to school. 

  • Blackboards were identified as the most needed input for school to restart with the minimum facility. 

Response

  • Imagine One Day is serving 7,585 children in displacement centres both in Shire and Mekelle through its assisted spontaneous return (ASR) and accelerated learning programme (ALP) activities.

  • Save the Children is supporting 1,750 children in Mekelle, Adigrat, Adwa and Axum displacement centres both in ASR and ALP programmes. 

  • Operation Rescue is supporting 373 children through its ALP program in Enderta woreda.  

  • World Vision is supporting 3,803 children at Enderta, Wejerat, Hintalo, Samre, Seharti and Dehuea Tembien. 

Gaps

  • A rapid assessment to identify key priorities for school reopening has to be conducted.

  • Banks are not operating, and it is becoming very difficult to pay by cash daily subsistence allowance (DSA) for training and other right holders. 

  • It is extremely difficult to communicate with woredas, the national office and staff in Tigray through mobile and internet. 

  • There is shortage of fuel and it is very difficult to get transport facilities.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Emergency Shelter & Non-Food Items

Needs

  • The conflict has uprooted hundreds of thousands of people across Tigray, leaving many in urgent need of emergency shelter and basic household items, including kitchen utensils, blankets, mats, among others. The new developments across the region, with relative calm in some areas, does not translate into a decreased need for shelter and non-food items. 

  • The high possibility of early and spontaneous returns of displaced people to their areas of origin increases the need for more shelter and return packages, particularly for those relocating back to villages and areas damaged or destroyed during the conflict. 

  • In addition, the Government plans to reopen schools in September 2021 will also require the distribution of shelter for hundreds of thousands of people who are now living in education centres across the region.

  • An unconfirmed number of people displaced from Afar are living with host communities in Wajirat woreda, according to a recent rapid assessment carried out at the first week of July. There is no displacement centre in the woreda and people are expected to move again to reach Mekelle, according to woreda representatives. Limited humanitarian assistance had been provided so far. Humanitarian aid and other supplies have been blocked for the last seven months in the main road, while residents’ household items such as blankets, solar panels or mobiles have been looted. The assessment identified that 24 houses had been totally damaged while 75 houses partially damaged by heavy artilleries and 27 houses burnt completely and one grinding mill house with equipment totally burned. The Assessment Team concluded that immediate food and non-food items should be distributed to the affected community. 

Response

  • As of 12 July, the Cluster reached over 620,000 beneficiaries (22 per cent of the total 2.7 million people targeted for the year). 

  • Cluster partners distributed 1,300 household items in Shire and Enderta, 2,000 in Shire and 485 to people with special needs in Mekelle and reached a total of 18,900 people displaced during the last week.

  • The Cluster also dispatched 500 NFIs for distribution in Yechila during the rapid assessment.

Gaps

  • While partners continue to gradually scale-up, the response is insufficient to meet needs of people affected, particularly in some woredas due to several factors, including ongoing heavy rainfall in several locations amid the already substandard living conditions of displaced people; operational challenges, including lack of fuel, electricity, communication and financial capability; disruption of supply chains, including household consumables and humanitarian items; market functionality, including price inflation and limited supply against the increasing demands.

  • In addition, the insufficient food distribution forced displaced people to sell out non-food items received from aid organizations to buy food and other essential goods.

  • Due to communications disruption, partners’ reporting has decreased significantly. 

  • Due to current security situation through the road from Semera to Mekelle, more than 9,000 NFIs got stranded in Semera and this has affected the Cluster plan for bulk distribution in the most affected (priority) woredas.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Food

Needs

  • According to the most recent unendorsed Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analysis, without urgent and unimpeded food aid, over 400,000 people in Tigray region are projected to face catastrophic conditions (IPC 5, Catastrophe); and over 1.8 million people in Emergency level of acute food insecurity (IPC 4) in Tigray could slide into starvation. In total, at least 5.2 million people in Tigray are targeted for each round of food distributions, which lasts about six weeks. 

  • The Food Cluster calls for urgent action to address the acute food insecurity in northern Ethiopia. Additional resources are urgently needed for partners to further scale up their operations and incorporate increased number of vulnerable households in emergency food assistance. 

  • In view of the deteriorating food security and nutrition situation, partners are revising their operational planning figures upwards to include additional needs identified on the ground. It has been very challenging to have clarity on the population figures per location due to the fluid context, poor or non-existing local Government structure, and lack of documentation among displaced people. 

Response

  • Since the launch of the first round of assistance under HRP 2021 in late March until 14 July, the three main food partners have assisted  4.91 million people with  82,991 metric tons of food across Mekelle town (402,341 people), Eastern (860,059), Western (61,771), Central (1,014,349), North-western (1,529,663), Southern (543,789) and South-Eastern (504,170) zones of Tigray under Round 1. While Round 1 distribution, which has been significantly delayed due to access challenges in many woredas, is being finalized, partners are simultaneously gearing up for the Round 2 distribution, which was launched in mid-May. For Round 2 distribution, 659,615 people have been assisted with 11,180 MT of food in Southern and North-western zones as of 14 July.

  • NDRMC has allocated 10,839 MT of food for round 1 of 2021 response plan. As of 23 June, it has distributed 1,664 MT of food to 110,923 people in Ofla, Zata, and Raya Alamata woredas of the Southern Zone and 927 MT of food to 61,771 IDPs in Maykadra, Humera, and Dansha woredas of the Western Zone. 

  • JEOP is progressing with Round 1 distribution of 2021 response plan, with 60,591 MT (80 per cent) of the allocated food distributed, assisting about 3.57 million people as of 14 July. JEOP partners have also launched its Round 2 distribution though partners’ activities have been negatively affected by the shortage of cash and fuel in the region.

  • WFP and its partners have completed their first round distribution in most of its operational areas with only distributions in Asgede ongoing. As of 14 July, it has distributed 19,809 metric tons of food to nearly 1.17 million people in Round 1 of the 2021 response plan. WFP is also conducting the second round of distribution, assisting 659,615 people with 11,180 metric tons of food in Southern and North-western zones as of 14 July. 

  • Given the improved intra-Tigray access and the urgent need to collectively adjust for recent inter-Tigray operational challenges considering the pressing needs, food and nutrition partners are working together to ensure both food and nutrition supplies are reaching the households in jointly prioritized locations, including Myknetal, Edaga Arbi (Endabatsihima), Keihtekli, Ahsea, Embasneyti (Nebelet), and Abergelle Yechilla. In Adet, a nutrition top-up ration will be included in the food package for households with children under age 5 and pregnant and lactating women.

Gaps

  • As of 19 July, food partners will only have enough food stock in Tigray region to feed around 1.94 million people with common food basket for one round. 

  • Shortage of fuel and cash as well as non-functional communication network in Tigray region are significantly hindering the resumption of food response by partners.

  • The humanitarian corridor between Afar and Tigray region (through Semera) remains restricted, preventing food stocks and fuel among other humanitarian goods from entering Tigray. There are also continuous delays in movement of humanitarian cargo due to checkpoints being set up on the main routes entering Tigray region from other parts of the country.

  • Efforts to reach out to the areas that are previously inaccessible by humanitarians is critical. There is also need for continuously increasing international presence in the field as humanitarians try to reach out to these areas. 

  • The flexibility for timely inclusion of verified vulnerable new caseloads in food assistance without quota limitation is urgently needed. 

  • Food partners are working with the current regional authorities to resolve the significant delay in beneficiary registration and targeting in some woredas and Mekelle, which hindered the timely launch of planned food distribution. The delay is mainly due to the increasing needs on the ground which is often greater than the approved caseload quota, previously poor or non-existing local Government structure, security concerns, and lack of documentation among the affected populations. 

  • Concerns over the size and composition of the current standard food basket as well as lack of cooking fuel have also been raised by affected people and partners. Some partners are exploring the possibility of providing full food basket and/or including transportation and milling costs in the food assistance package in prioritized locations. 

  • To ensure food partners’ timely response without pipeline break and avert any risk of famine, US$151 million is urgently required for the remainder of the year. This funding requirement is based on the current established ration common to main food partners in country, representing 63 per cent of the kilocalories required to survive. In order for food partners to be able to adequately cover the full needs of populations, especially those projected to be in IPC 4 and IPC 5 – a significant further increase in resources would be required.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Health

Needs

  • Healthcare services in Tigray are alarmingly limited, leaving  hundreds of thousands of people, including those injured during the fighting, pregnant women and survivors of sexual violence, without adequate access to essential medicines and basic attention.

  • Health facilities have been targeted, attacked and looted over the course of the conflict, and less than half of the referral hospitals of the region are now operative. There is an urgent need to support health facilities across the region to start operating with minimal activities.

  • The Cluster needs urgent funding and access to replenish facilities across the entire region with medicines, consumables and medical equipment, to enable health workers to resume activities. 

  • With increased risk of disease outbreaks, including due to lack of access to water and sanitation, the Cluster needs to strengthen disease surveillance through early disease detection, as well as accelerate cholera and malaria readiness and completion of prepositioning of cholera supplies. In high-risk woredas, the Cluster needs to complete preparations for the second round of the cholera vaccination campaign.

Response

  • A micro plan of action for cholera preparedness and response plan and inventory of essential supplies was completed.

  • Technical guidance provided to hospital staff in Mekelle Hospital on integration COVID-19 and Essential Health Services, and stock assessment of essential medicine and supplies conducted. Additionally, at least five health workers were trained on management of severe acute malnutrition with medical complications. 

  • Out-Patient Departments at the Ayder and Mekelle hospitals identified to carry out nutrition services. 

  • 30 Mobile Health and Nutrition Teams (MHNT) supported to continue operating in different woredas in the regions. At least 28 of the MHNT supported by the Regional Health Bureau were pulled out from the system when the new government took office.

  • Technically supervised and supported health partners on the use of formula milk at displacements facilities in relation to the international code of conduct on formula milk.

Gaps

  • Damages to health facilities, with equipment looted and vandalized, especially out of Mekelle, are severely impacting health workers capacity to resume services, amidst limited access to new supplies. Health facilities are facing important challenges with diagnostic capacity.

  • Although health staff are returning to work, there are still challenges in remuneration, as last salaries were received in May 2021.

  • The limited cash flow due to banking restrictions is affecting the implementation of response activities by health partners.

  • The ongoing interruption in telecommunications affect surveillance, data management and reporting.

  • Limited health core pipeline supplies in Mekelle for the health response.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Logistics

Needs

  • Increased dedicated transport capacity to reach more areas across the region.

Response

  • During the reporting period, the Logistics Cluster facilitated approximately 10 metric tons (MT) of humanitarian cargo inside Tigray on behalf of 2 partners.

  • Logistics training were conducted for partners in Mekelle and Shire.

  • The Logistics Cluster supports some 41 partners operating in Tigray.

Gaps

  • Ongoing insecurity and access constraints in some areas are hindering the transport of humanitarian cargo.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Nutrition

Needs

  • According to the latest IPC analysis released in June, malnutrition was expected to increase between July and September, especially in hard-to-reach rural communities affected by conflict. Purposive sampling surveys conducted  in  the  most  affected  kebeles  (non-representative)  showed  proxy  global  acute  malnutrition  (GAM) based on mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) ranging from 20 per cent to 34 per cent across North-Western, Central, Eastern and South-Eastern Tigray.

Response

  • A total of 5,276 children between 6 and 59 months were screened for acute malnutrition, with 74 of them identified as severe wasting and enrolled for treatment, representing 1.4 per cent of those screened. In addition, 86 children were identified as moderate acute malnutrition, 1.6 per cent of children under age 5 screened. 

  • Some 738 pregnant and/or breastfeeding mothers were screened for malnutrition, with 164 or 22.2 per cent of them diagnosed with acute malnutrition.

  • At least 1,900 pregnant and/or breastfeeding mothers received one or two maternal, infant and young child feeding counselling, designed to prevent malnutrition. 

Gaps

  • Only 5 out of 20 nutrition partners were able to reach operational facilities and communities to collect and provide data for the current reporting week due to various challenges including no communication services, lack of cash and shortage of fuel. 

  • Partners are finding it challenging to access frontline staff and operational areas due to lack of communications, shortage of fuel and closure of banks in the region, resulting in a very low reporting rate and difficulties to scale-up response implementation.

  • Partners will appreciate availability of fuel and the reopening of banks with full services to scale up response for severe acute malnutrition in areas with high caseloads.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Protection

Needs

  • Gross violations and abuses against civilians, including forced displacement and returns, killings, abductions, sexual violence and abuses have been reported since the beginning of the conflict in Tigray.

  • Women and children displaced are at heightened risk of abuses and exploitation, and the inadequate living conditions in collective centres for displaced people further exposing women and girls to sexual and gender-based violence (GBV).

  • Awareness campaigns and information about risks linked to unexploded explosive ordnance (UXO) and firearms in displacement sites are increasingly urgent, particularly after the explosion of one UXO in a camp in Shire.

  • With relatively improved access within Tigray since end-June, protection partners preliminary assessment in previously hard-to-reach areas indicated a dire situation, with communities destroyed, looted, and in urgent need of humanitarian services.

Response

  • The Protection Cluster members were encouraged to provide assistance and protection in the former hard-to-reach areas. Some members conducted assessments in some of the areas and shared their reports.

  • Since the number of incidents relating to unexploded devices and mine is increasing, the Cluster has decided to start an awareness/sensitization campaign. 

  • During the week, partners working on prevention and assistance to survivors of gender-based violence reached affected locations in Mekelle, Abi Adi, Chila, Telemt, Dabat, Habau, Gondar, Chagni, and Debark woreda’s, Tanqua Mlash, Tanqua Abergele displacement sites, where they provided protection, gender and mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) activities.

  • The Enrolment and Return working group has finalized their ToR that will be shared after endorsement by the Protection Cluster. There are currently working on the action plan.

  • With the participation of five protection staff from both UNHCR and partner IHS, the Protection Cluster in Shire, along with CCCM, has finalized the first round of the household intention survey inside Shire and will move ahead with the exercise in outside of the town during the coming week. This to be carried out with expanded support by protection partners, including human resources and other logistical support. Meanwhile, DTM expert of IOM will be working on data validation and analysing for the inside Shire exercise.

  • Some action points have been discussed and agreed during the PC weekly meeting as follows:

  • MRE as well as mine actions and UXOs related matters to be a standard agenda item for all coming PC Shire meetings.

  • Further to the establishment of the coordination body at the Central Zone level and assigning IHS to lead the protection coordination, the Cluster conducted a meeting with the assigned focal point and oriented about the coordination mechanisms and other aspect to be consider while leading and representing the Cluster in Axum. It was also agreed that the coordination efforts carried out at central level to be reported to Shire on a weekly basis. 

  • IMC updated about the GBV program in Shire, Axum and Sheraro through integrated programs covering both prevention and response, including counselling and community mobilization and awareness messages. They flagged the delay in the construction of women and girls safe space (WGSS), but in the meantime, they managed to overcome that by utilizing the protection desks run by HIS.

  • GBV Psychosocial Support (PSS): at least 14 women at risk identified, assessed for needs, and provided mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) by AAH. In addition, 4 counselling sessions conducted with women survivors of GBV through survivors’ centred approach.

  • Cash and Voucher Support: AAH provided ETB3,000 to nine women survivors of GBV, one woman at risk of GBV, and one male household at risk, to allow them to access basic needs and ensure their safety and dignity.

  • GBV Referrals: 30 female and 4 males referred and assisted with NFI  and WASH items by AAH. A further 13 people living with disabilities, and 10 women head of households at risk identified and registered, provided with individual protection assistance (IPA) and linked to other sectoral services. 

  • GBV Prevention and Risk Mitigation: AAH conducted awareness raising activities on services availability for GBV, child protection and referral pathways, reaching 126 women and girls. 

  • Dignity Kits Distribution: UNFPA, AAH, distributed dignity kits to a total of 15 female individuals in Tanquamlash and 14 women in Tanquaabergele.

  • GBV Capacity building and Training: OSSHD/UNFPA conducted training for 13 health workers, from HCs and hospitals, including woreda level health experts, across Telemt, Dabat, Habau, Gondar, Chagni, and Debark woredas, and WoWCYA, conducted by the Ethiopian Midwife Association (EMA). 

  • 43 unaccompanied and separated children identified and documented for case management and psychosocial support.

Gaps

  • During the ICCG meeting, different clusters warned about the need to scale up the GBV operation following an increase in number of reported cases, especially in areas outside of Shire, including Adwa and Zana. This also requires an update of the referral pathway and mapping the existing GBV partners on the ground. 

  • Partners continue to be constrained by the limited access to cash availability, impacting programmes.

  • Lack of access to internet is a major challenge and is causing difficulties in communication, including reporting.

  • Partners are increasingly facing challenges accessing fuel to run services, including to reach far off woredas.

  • Supplies are running low, and there is genuine fear among partners of soon being unable to provide services as no supply are coming through.

URL:

Downloaded:

Ethiopia - Tigray Region Humanitarian Update

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

Needs

  • With access to water, hygiene and sanitation services largely disrupted across Tigray, the population is at heightened risk of disease outbreaks, including water-borne diseases.

  • Frequent power cuts and lack of fuel hamper water supply and continuous functionality of water schemes across the region.

  • The situation is particularly dire in sites for internally displaced people, as the constrained supply pipelines—due to challenges to access Tigray from other parts of Ethiopia—and disruption of electricity and fuel to the pumps are driving a significant reduction in water availability.

Response

  • WASH partners are providing critical services, including water trucks, to 37 woredas across the region, including 11 in the Central Zone, 12 in the Eastern, 2 in Northern, 7 in South-Eastern Zone, as well as Mekelle Town. 

  • Partners are conducting hygiene promotion activities in across the region, including displacement sites. 

  • In Mekelle, partners reached 2,200 families with soap in May Woyni displacement camp.

  • Across the region, the Cluster distributed six mobile handwashing facilities that will improve hygiene conditions of 2,400 people, and reached nearly 700 people with water treatment chemicals and products. In addition, 640 people received hygiene kits, including bathing and laundry soap, sanitary pads, buckets or jerry cans, nappies and potties. 

Gaps

  • Lack of fuel significantly hinders WASH interventions, in particular water-tankering operations and proper functionality of water supply schemes (generators).

  • Shortages of WASH supplies due to limited availability of NFIs at the local market and shortages of cash to replenish the stocks are limiting the response.

  • Communication challenges due to cut of mobile network and internet connections.

  • Government structure is not yet fully functional.

  • WASH supplies, materials and infrastructure, equipment, vehicles, supplies and administrative offices have been looted in several locations.

  • There are budget constraints to fulfil WASH response across Tigray and more resources have to be mobilized.

  • Limited presence of WASH partners in the Central, South-Eastern, Southern and North-Western zones.

  • Market survey and application of cash vouchers for WASH NFIs and hygiene supplies are pending.

URL:

Downloaded: