Ethiopia

Situation Report

Highlights

  • 6,037 internally displaced people assisted to voluntarily relocate from Semera to Ab’ala. Semera displacement site has been effectively closed on 5 September;
  • Despite renewed hostilities, humanitarian response has continued in accessible areas with the available stocks in Afar, Amhara and Tigray regions;
  • More than 59,000 people are reportedly displaced by floods in Afar Region and require assistance;
  • More than 16 million people in drought affected areas require multisectoral assistance at least until the end of the year, and beyond.
Haro Maya stabilization Center, East Hararghe, Oromia region
August 2022. Haro Maya stabilization Center, East Hararghe, Oromia region. Mothers and their children receive SAM treatment. Credit: Manuel Morini/OCHA Ethiopia.

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Ethiopia

Situation Report

Key Figures

20M
people requiring humanitarian assistance
3.085B
funding requirement for assistance in 2022
39.2%
percentage funded as of 6 September
700M
funding towards drought response

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Contacts

OCHA Ethiopia

Strategic Communications Unit

Ethiopia

Situation Report
Background

Disclaimer

This is OCHA Ethiopia bi-weekly digital Situation Report covering the humanitarian situation, needs, response and gaps country-wide. The weekly Northern Ethiopia Situation Report has been discontinued and will be included in this report. This report is prepared with the support and collaboration of cluster coordinators and humanitarian partners. In some cases, access and communication constraints mean that updates for the period are delayed and cannot be reflected. Boundaries, names, and designations of districts/zones indicated in the report do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.  Please contact ocha-eth-communication@un.org for any comment or question you may have on this publication.

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Ethiopia

Situation Report
Background

Situation Overview

Multiple man-made and natural crisis across different regions of Ethiopia continue to drive high humanitarian needs. As indicated in the 2022 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP), more than 20 million people will require humanitarian assistance and protection services until the end of 2022. The mid-year review of the 2022 HRP is being finalized and will also incorporate the recently released Drought Response Plan (1).

Following the resumption of hostilities some three weeks ago, after a five-month generally calm situation in northern Ethiopia, the displacement of tens of thousands of people has been reported in parts of Afar, Amhara and Tigray regions. The situation continues to create higher humanitarian needs and further stretch the limited response capacity of humanitarian partners striving to deliver assistance to people in need.

In Afar Region, 6,037 IDPs have voluntarily relocated from Semera to Ab’ala, and the Semera IDP site has been effectively closed on 5 September.The relocation process had started on 16 August. Humanitarian partners continue to provide assistance to those relocated in their current location, including supporting health services and water infrastructure in Ab’ala. Voluntary relocation from another site in Semera and of internally displaced persons (IDPs) residing with the host community will be conducted once preparations are completed and if security situation permits.

Meanwhile, new displacements continue to be reported due to the ongoing hostilities in Afar Region. Displacements are also being reported due to floods, withmore than 59,000 people reportedly displaced in Asayita, Afambo, Dubti and Mille in Zone 1 and Gewane, Gelalo, Amibara, Hanruka, Buremudaytu, Awash Fentale and Dulecha Woredas in Zone 3. Additional areas are at risk of floods. Some of the newly displaced people have received food, emergency shelter and non-food items assistance, albeit still very limited compared to the high needs. At the same time, some flood-affected areas remain temporarily inaccessible.

In Amhara Region, the hostilities are affecting communities in North Gondar, North Wollo and Wag Hemra zones among others. Debark in North Gondar, Kobo and Woldiya in North Wollo as well as Abergele and Sekota in Wag Hemra remain hard-to-reach for humanitarian operators due to the volatile security situation. Destruction of property and of civilian infrastructure has also been reported. In North Wollo Zone, Jara IDP site was reportedly looted and part of the existing infrastructure damaged or destroyed. On 30 August 2022, more than 30,000 IDPs who were sheltering in the site had left looking for safety as news spread about fighting reportedly nearing Woldiya City, which is located some 50 kilometers from Jara. Most of the IDPs have now returned to the damaged site where the Government and humanitarian partners have resumed the provision of food and water trucking services. Lack of fuel and intermittent access challenges, however, are limiting the response efforts.

Regional authorities have recently set up six collective sites in Mersa Town in North Wollo Zone on 6 September to accommodate increased number of IDPs. At least 12,000 newly displaced people, mainly women and children, are taking refuge in the town. Following the findings of a recent interagency needs assessment mission to Mersa Town, partners are mobilizing food and non-food items for distribution to assist them. A mobile health and nutrition team has already been dispatched to the town.

The overall food security level is concerning with at least 5 million people considered food insecure in Amhara. The situation is particularly dire in conflict-affected areas in the region. Malnutrition levels in more than 80 per cent of these areas are high. The most recent Government nutrition hotspot classification published in March 2022 revealed 125 hotspot woredas across the region, of which 74 are Priority One for response. Blanket and targeted supplementary feeding as well as school feeding programs are ongoing, but due to resources’ constraints, partners can target only 83 per cent of the targeted food-insecure people, including some only receiving an incomplete food basket (limited to wheat).

Flooding has also been reported in several flood-prone areas in Amhara Region, including in North Gondar, South Gondar and West Gojam zones. The Regional Flood Contingency Plan estimates that more than 487,000 people will be affected, of which more than 29,000 are likely to be displaced across 32 woredas in seven zones. Food response is ongoing but with severe limitations due to resource constraints.

Similarly, in Tigray Region, hostilities continued to be reported in several parts with tens of thousands of people reportedly displaced and civilian property and infrastructure damaged. New conflict-induced displacements are expected around Adigrat, Mai Tsebri and Sheraro. Movements of humanitarian convoy along the Semera - Mekelle route remains suspended since 24 August, hindering the transportation of humanitarian supplies. The United Nations Humanitarian Air Service (UNHAS) flights, which had been flying between Addis Ababa and Mekelle twice per week and had recently announced the organization of a third weekly flight, also remains suspended since 26 August, hampering the rotation of humanitarian workers and the transfer of cash for humanitarian operations. Nevertheless, the distribution of humanitarian assistance continues in accessible areas in Tigray with the remaining available stocks in the region, including supporting health centers and hospitals medical supplies and cold chain equipment (freezers and refrigerators). Partners have also mobilized shelter supplies for 23,000 newly displaced households in Shire and Mekelle towns, while preparations are underway to receive new IDPs in Sebacare IDP site in Mekelle and Mai Dimu site in Shire.

Hostilities in parts of western, southern, and eastern Ethiopia also continue to drive humanitarian needs. Hostilities in western Oromia, particularly in the Wollega zones, have also led to an influx of displacement across the Wollega zones and into Amhara Region, particularly to Debre Birhan Town in North Shewa Zone. The latest insecurity in Somali Region continues to impede the drought response, particularly in parts of Afder and Shabelle zones, as well as partially in Liben Zone. Meanwhile in Siti Zone, people displaced by violence in recent months are receiving assistance. The displaced population is sheltering in Aydhidhi, Bediwayn, Caska and Garba sites. An inter-agency mission will be monitoring the ongoing response to gauge new needs as well as identify gaps.

In eastern and southeastern Ethiopia, the Government and humanitarian partners continue to mobilize resources to scale-up multi-sector lifesaving assistance to close to 17 million people living in drought-affected areas, but the needs still surpass ongoing response, where the drought continues to impact several essential and critical sectors. In addition to deepening food insecurity and rising malnutrition, school dropouts and protection risks are rife. At present, around 9.9 million people require food assistance, and 2.9 million children and pregnant and breastfeeding women require nutrition interventions until the end of the year. The education of 1.4 million children has also been disrupted due to drought-induced migration, school closure or communicable diseases. The health impacts of the drought are also rising, including measles and diarrheal cases.

In Somali Region,for example, the number of dysentery/diarrheal cases have shown an increasing trend in recent weeks, particularly in Afder, Dawa, Fafan and Shabelle zones. Overall, the number of diarrheal cases in the region has increased by 33 per cent compared to the same period last year. The Government and partners are implementing prevention and control measures, including increasing access to safe drinking water and sanitation, provision of drugs and overall support to health facilities. Overall, 11 million people in drought affected areas require health interventions until the end of the year. In SNNPR, even if water availability has improved following the good rains received during the summer/Kiremt (June-September) rainy season, water trucking support needs to continue in the chronically water-insecure areas such as Benatsemay, Dasenech, Gangatom and Hamer woredas of South Omo Zone; Wera Dijo Woreda of Halaba Zone, and Dugna Fango Woreda of Wolayita Zone.

The humanitarian situation is expected to deteriorate further in parts of drought affected areas with the reported fifth consecutive failed Deyr/Hageya rainy season (October – December), according to most recent forecasts. The extent of the drought impact is captured in the revised Drought Response Plan (1) published on 8 September. This plan will serve to organize and monitor the drought response until the end of 2022.

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Footnotes

1. Find link to the Drought Response Plan here: https://bit.ly/3S5zzYf

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Ethiopia

Situation Report
Emergency Response

Pooled Funding

As of 6 September, the US$3 billion requirements for the 2022 Ethiopia Humanitarian Response Plan was 39.2 per cent funded with $1.2 billion donor funding for conflict, drought, and flood-induced humanitarian needs. The water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH); camp coordination and camp management (CCCM); and protection sectors are the least funded according to current data. Funding gaps are reported across all sectors, hampering the mobilization of timely response.

Looking at the drought response specifically, a total of US$700 million is estimated to have been contributed for the drought response to date by donors. Between January and July, more than 8 million people were assisted with food, 1.4 million people with nutrition supplements, 2.9 million people with agricultural support, and 2.5 million people with WASH services. But this coverage is significantly low compared to the vast needs and more funding is needed to meet them.

Since the beginning of 2022 and as of 31 August 2022, the Ethiopian Humanitarian Fund (EHF) received US$49.7 million in confirmed contributions from the governments of Canada, Denmark, France, Germany, Ireland, Italy, Jersey, New Zealand, Norway, Sweden, Switzerland, and the United Kingdom. This represents decrease of $15 million compared to the same period last year. Two reserve allocations totaling $22.5 million have been disbursed since the beginning of the year to respond to drought ($15 million) in three most affected regions, namely Somali, Oromia and SNNP; to support the emergency in northern Ethiopia with the initial construction IDP sites in Amhara Region ($5 million); and to strengthen rapid response mechanism for sudden onset disasters across the country ($2.5 million).

Currently, the EHF is preparing its first standard allocation strategy following consultations with clusters and partners.

In parallel and in complementarity with the EHF, the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) has allocated US$12 million since the beginning of the year to address food insecurity in drought-affected areas in Somali, Oromia and SNNP regions. Partners who received the funds have started projects’ implementation in June.

Continued donor support is critical to enable humanitarian partners to maintain and strengthen the delivery of assistance to vulnerable people in conflict and natural disasters-affected areas across the country.

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Ethiopia

Situation Report
Feature
Kedija measuring teff seeds. Mersa, North Wollo Zone.
Kedija measuring teff seeds. Mersa, North Wollo Zone. Photo Credit: EOTC-DICAC

HUMAN STORY This excerpt is from the full story originally published by the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church – Development and Inter-Church Aid Commission’s (EOTC-DICAC) - The path to recovery – the story of Kedija

Kedija is a mother of three children who lives in Habru Woreda of North Wollo Zone, in Amhara Region. She and her entire family had lost all their belongings and livelihood due to the conflict in northern Ethiopia that impacted her neighborhood a year ago. The entire harvest of their land, along with their 15 sheep and a camel were lost in one day. The entire family was forced to flee their home looking for safety and assistance. Safety they found, but food and water were hard to come by. “It was very difficult to see the pain and despair on my children’s face. With nothing to offer, I only gave them hugs of comfort”, she said. 

Now Kedija is happy and full of hope now that she is back to her hometown. She was one of the 8,811 farmers who benefitted from the Ethiopian Orthodox Tewahido Church – Development and Inter-Church Aid Commission’s (EOTC-DICAC) recovery support for violence-affected communities in North Wollo Zone. At least 687 quintals of improved teff seeds were distributed through this program, enough to cover some 369 hectares of farmland during the Kiremt rainy season. “After all the suffering we went through, we survived and now I have 5 kilos of improved teff seed that I can sow before the teff-sowing season ends” Kedija said. This is one step in her long journey of recovery. She hopes for a better, peaceful life. 

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Ethiopia

Situation Report
Visual

Humanitarian Access in Ethiopia

ocha ethiopia 220809 national access map august draft 004-2-01

This is the latest humanitarian access map of the country. As part of OCHA's regular monitoring of the operational environment and access constraints in Ethiopia, we continue to monitor how these constraints impact relief operations and people's access to humanitarian aid and services across the country.

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Situation Report
Visual

Operational Presence of Organizations

Final Ethiopia Partners presence May 2022-58--01

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Ethiopia

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Agriculture

Needs

  • An estimated 17.5 million people need agricultural support in 2022 across Ethiopia, of whom 11.5 million people are targeted.

  • The upcoming Meher harvest from October to December 2022 is expected to perform below average in drought-affected areas as well as new areas that are likely to face drought conditions, further increasing the number of people requiring agricultural support.

Response

  • 10,868.5 MT of fertilizer reached Tigray.

  • At least 2.9 million people in drought affected areas received agricultural support

  • More than 60,000 households supported with crop seeds, tools, and livestock drugs and vaccines across the country for the Meher agricultural season

  • Overall, 3.3 million people received at least one type of agricultural support throughout the country in 2022, which is 26.3 per cent of target.

Gaps

  • Lack of fertilizers to support the current seasonal response.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Camp Coordination and Camp Management

Needs

  • Firewood, cooking oil, milling support and WASH services continue to be needed in the majority of IDP sites across Ethiopia, affecting at least 582,000 IDPs.

  • Shortage of critical medications, medical equipment and supplies is reported in about 154 IDP sites supported by partners, affecting approximately 582,000 IDPs.

  • Need for drinking water is critical in some IDP sites due to low level of water trucking, while construction and dislodging of latrines also remain in need to avert epidemics during the rainy season.

  • Rehabilitation and reconstruction of shelter due to harsh weather conditions, sandstorm, rainstorms, and hot climate in Afar, Somali and Tigray regions. For example, in northwest Tigray 1,156 households’ shelters were fully/partially damaged in 12 sites while in Somali Region, 2,160 IDP homes were fully/partially damaged at Qoloji 1 and 2 camps. In Afar region several shelters were destroyed in Agatina IDP site.

Response

  • Shelter construction work continued in various sites across Ethiopia during July, including 200 duplex shelters in Aid Abay, 215 shelters upgraded in Hitsats and 1,232 duplex shelters and 20 communal kitchens and two multipurpose community centers finalized in Mai-Dimu in Shire, Tigray. Four communal kitchens were also constructed in Woyneshet and 3 Kebele IDP sites in Debre Birhan. The construction of seven communal kitchen and one multipurpose shed has also started in TIRKI relocation site.

  • In Somali Region, 2160 IDPs hit by windstorm at Qoloji IDP site received shelter repair material. Each household received two tarpaulin/plastic sheets, one rope and 18 pieces of bathing soap.

  • In Tigray, 550 solar streetlights were installed in 25 IDP sites in Adwa, Shire, and Adigrat during July.

  • Also in Tigray, 1,406 plastic sheets were distributed to 850 households in 11 IDP sites in Shire; and the maintenance of 563 partially damaged duplex shelters was ongoing during the reporting period.

  • In Oromia Region, household level intention survey was conducted in seven woredas of East and West Hararge zones from 18 to 21 July. 16 IDP sites hosting 1592 long-term IDP households were provided their input on durable solutions options.

  • In Amhara, local authorities approved a 1.6-hectare land to establish a new IDP site in Debre Berhan in North Shewa, which would help decongest existing sites. A multi-agency assessment determined the site suitability of the site.

Gaps

  • Limited number of CCCM partners and lack of cash is hampering CCCM related activities, including monitoring and site improvement.

  • Insecurity preventing access to some IDP sites

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Education

Needs

  • As of July, 9382 schools were fully or partially damaged requiring rehabilitation support; and 4262 schools were closed due to violence and natural disasters. As a result, more than 2.93 million children across Ethiopia remained out of school, including 2.53 million due to violence and 401,000 due to drought.

  • Overall, there is need to provide teaching and learning material, school feeding, WASH as well as mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) for violence and natural disaster affected school facilities and students.

  • In Gambella Region, 134 schools impacted by wind and flood need rehabilitation support.

Response

  • At least 247,000 children (190,000 in Amhara, 25,000 in Tigray, 24,000 in Afar, 8000 in Somali) have receive Education in Emergency (EiE), including provision of individual leaning material, school feeding service and access to education opportunities through the Accelerated Learning Program (ALP) and Accelerated School Readiness (ASR) programs and others.

Gaps

  • Lack of funding for school-feeding program, construction of temporary learning schools, rehabilitation and reconstruction of schools, provision of gender segregated latrines, accelerated and catch-up learning program (only 39 per cent of funding required by the cluster received).

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Emergency Shelter & Non-Food Items

Needs

  • Across Ethiopia, 4.5 million people are currently targeted for ES/NFI assistance.

  • In Tigray, more than 1.8 million people need of ES/NFI assistance; and more than 800,000 people are estimated to be impacted by heavy rains and floods in the coming three months, including IDPs currently living in sites, new seasonal displacements as well as the host community.

  • In Amhara, 517,000 IDPs and returnees still require ES/NFI assistance, with almost half living in inadequate conditions. Overcrowding is a major problem in collective centers in Deber Berhan, Sekota, and Zarima, increasing health and protection risks to IDPs living there.

  • Overall, 1.5 million people were estimated to require ES/NFI assistance in Amhara Region in 2022.

  • In Somali, at least 31,984 drought-affected households require ES/NFI support.

  • Reconstruction or repair for returnees living in damaged shelters or temporary shelters across the country.

Response

  • In Amhara, nearly 458,000 IDPs and returnees were assisted with ES/NFI during the reporting period, including 12,000 IDPs who have received shelter assistance in Jara and TIRKI.

  • In Tigray, 475,787people received emergency shelter and NFI assistance since the beginning of the year.

  • In Somali Region, as of end July, 8.3 per cent of ES/NFI needs of drought affected IDPs were met IDPs were supported with Full ES/NFI kits, and few were supported with cash for NFIs, especially in locations of Shabelle Zone where markets were accessible.

Gaps

  • Increased influx of IDPs in Tigray, Amhara, Oromia, and Somali regions have added to the already existing unmet needs.

  • Ongoing hostilities and security concerns over the past few weeks affected partners’ movement and field activities in several locations across the country.

  • Only 602,000 people can be reached with shelter/NFI assistance with available resources in Tigray, leaving 54 per cent of the initial target population without assistance.

  • Low funding, particularly for repair and reconstruction assistance in the returnee area in Amhara.

  • Lack of viable land for relocation of IDPs, and delay in installation of camp facilities in the newly proposed relocation sites in Amhara.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Food

Needs

  • More than 20 million people are estimated to be food insecure in the country mainly due to the drought in southern, southeastern, and eastern parts of the country; violence in northern and western; coupled with high inflation.  

  • The projected below normal harvest from the Belg season and the projected below normal rainfall for Deyr rain in southern pastoralist areas; as well as violence and floods will likely contribute to worsening further the food security situation in affected regions.

Response

  • As of 22 August, the three food partners (the Government, the UN, and the NGOs) have reached 7.7 million people under Round 1 (1)food response for 2022; 4.2 million people under Round 2 food response for 2022; and 407,000 people under Round 3 food response for 2022.

  • In Tigray Region alone and as of 17 August, 5.93 million people received food assistance under Round 3 food response for 2021, which was delayed due to operational challenges; and 59,005 people were reached as of 17 August under the new round of 2022 food response.

  • 1 Under the 2022 Humanitarian Response Plan, Food Cluster partners started Round 1 food ration distribution on 21 April; Round 2 on 3 June; and Round 3 on 27 July.

Gaps

  • Escalation of the violence in Amhara Region preventing partners from accessing large parts of northern and eastern Amhara from the Kombolcha primary distribution point. Access constraints are also hampering response in bordering areas in Tigray and violence-affected areas in western Oromia.

  • Likewise, in Somali Region, reduced cereals ration is being distributed in Round 2, from 15kgs to 12 kgs and now 10kgs due to funding shortfalls.

  • Delay in completing food distribution for planned rounds due to operational and logistical challenges.

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Footnotes

1. Under the 2022 Humanitarian Response Plan, Food Cluster partners started Round 1 food ration distribution on 21 April; Round 2 on 3 June; and Round 3 on 27 July. 

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Health

Needs

  • An estimated 13 million people are in need emergency health assistance in Ethiopia due to conflict, drought and floods, including about three million displaced people.

Response

  • 244,515 people were assisted with health services across Ethiopia in June.

  • In 2022, and as of the end of June, 1.3 million people out of the 7.1 million people targeted for health interventions, were reached with key health interventions.

  • More than 421,000 children aged 6 months-15 years received measles vaccination in June.

  • 2,000 mothers delivered safely through the assistance of skilled health personnel in June.

Gaps

  • No salary payment for health staff in emergency affected locations, in an already strained health system, and partners’ inability to recruit the appropriate staff.

  • Lack of regular supply chain for medicines and delays in emergency funding.

  • Health facilities in many return locations were fully or partially destroyed by the conflict or floods, need rehabilitation.

  • Lack of fuel and cash affecting the delivery of health services especially in the northern Ethiopia.

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Cluster Status

Logistics

Needs

  • Safe and sustained access and additional transportation routes via road and air to transport the required humanitarian supplies to Tigray and other hard-to reach areas, mainly in Amhara and Afar regions.

  • Increased needs of transport and potential storage for partners.

  • Deployment of Mobile storage units (MSUs) in light of the coming rainy season to support prepositioning.

Response

  • In July, eight convoys totaling 1220 trucks confirmed arrival in Mekelle on behalf of 23 partners.

  • The cluster airlifted 92.2 mt of humanitarian cargo in July, including health, nutrition, and office items on behalf of 6 partners.

  • In Amhara, the cluster facilitated four convoys to Wag Hemra Zone in July.

  • The cluster received approximately 783 m³ of WASH and shelter items for storage at Gondar warehouse on behalf of 1 partner and 30 m³ of health and protection items for storage at the Kombolcha warehouse on behalf of 2 partners in July.

  • In Afar, the cluster provided transport services of approximately 147 mt of NFI items in collaboration with one partner for people relocating from Semera to Ab’ala.

  • The cluster also stored 1,695 m³ of assorted humanitarian cargo in the Semera warehouse on behalf of eight partners in July.

Gaps

  • Limited or lack of essential items facilitating humanitarian deliveries

  • Limited number of commercial transporters in and to Tigray. Limited transporters to support Afar humanitarian response.

  • Increased needs for storage and transport services in North Shewa, and other locations in Amhara.

  • Needs to speed up deployment of Mobile storage units (MSUs) due to the coming of rainy season in Amhara.

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Footnotes

2. The Logistic Cluster is only active in northern Ethiopia. 

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Nutrition

Needs

  • Provision of nutrition treatment to more than 1.2 million children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and 5.4 million children and pregnant and lactating women (PLW) with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) across the country.

Response

  • Between January and June, 324,312 children under five received treatment for severe acute malnutrition across the county

  • 1,176,026 children under five were treated for moderate acute malnutrition across the country during the same period, while 767,177 undernourished pregnant and lactating women were assisted with supplements to improve their dietary intake.

Gaps

  • Lack of nutrition supplies for SAM and MAM treatment and lack of/dysfunctional health facilities impacting response at scale.

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Cluster Status

Protection

Needs

  • 7.9 million people across Ethiopia need protection services.

Response

  • More than 6,000 drought-affected vulnerable women, girls, boys, elderly, and people with special needs in Somali Region received material support.

  • 250 adolescent girls and young women in hard-to-reach areas of Genete Mariam, Fotomanjare and Asintsa IDP sites in Assosa Zone, Benishangul Gumuz Region received dignity kits.

  • Some 6087 girls and boys were assisted with case management services, and 22,156 individuals – including 15,785 children – were reached with mental health and psycho-social support (MHPSS) services.

  • About 50,000 people received awareness raising sessions on child protection risk prevention and mitigation.

Gaps

  • Protection response in places of return continues to be very limited, as is overall support to returned IDPs.

  • Limited access to recently displaced IDPs and assistance in conflict-affected areas.

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Cluster Status

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

Needs

  • An estimated 13 million people need WASH services in the drought affected woredas across the country

  • Insecurity in the North of the country and new displacements in Afar and Amhara require further WASH services in IDP collective sites to accommodate the needs of newly displaced people.

Response

  • In July, the WASH cluster’s 41 active partners reached a total of 230,225 people with cluster’s activities. 

  • Since the start of the year, and until end of July 2022, 3.6 million people received WASH services across Ethiopia as follows:

    • 1.9 million people received access to safe drinking water through emergency water trucking.

    • More than 1.6 million people received access to safe drinking water through durable solutions.

    • Around 450,000 people were provided with lifesaving WASH NFIs.

    • Around 270,000 people were provided with access to sanitation facilities (latrine, bathing and hand washing facilities) across the country.

    • More than one million people were reached through essential sanitation and hygiene messages.

Gaps

  • Given the scope of needs across the country, many regions still lack sufficient partners’ presence.

  • Lack of funding remains a concern to implement critical WASH activities across affected areas.

  • While emergency water trucking alleviates immediate needs, drought affected areas require long term investments in water systems to address needs in the region. Linking emergency and long-term response needs to be further strengthened.

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