Kenya

Situation Report

Highlights

  • Following intense rainfall, multiple lakes and waterways in Kenya are at record-high levels, causing displacement and loss of livelihoods for surrounding communities.
  • The desert locust situation has improved and only residual swarms are being reported in Samburu County. However, further swarms are expected in November.
  • Acute malnutrition remain high across the Arid and Semi-Arid Land (ASAL) counties. Access to treatment has been challenging for many families during the COVID-19 pandemic.
  • The number of positive COVID-19 cases has increased since the beginning of October, following an increase on laboratory testing capacity across the country.
  • Phased return to school has started, with the first groups resuming classes on 12 October.
UNICEF Kenya
Stacey, 17, revises her Form 4 lessons from a single textbook in the alleyway outside the one-room home she shares with her mother and sister. © UNICEF/Alissa Everett

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Kenya

Situation Report

Key Figures

14.2M
People in Need
10.1M
People Targeted

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Kenya

Situation Report

Funding

$286.8M
requested (April - Sept 2020)
$106.3M
received or pledged
37.1%
funded or pledged

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Contacts

Guiomar Pau Sole

Head, Communications Unit, OCHA ROSEA

Saviano Abreu

Communications Team Leader

Kenya

Situation Report
Background

Situation Overview

The food security situation in the Arid and Semi-Arid Lands (ASAL) counties has significantly improved after two consecutive seasons of above-average rains, with approximately 739,000 people currently facing severe food insecurity (IPC Phase 3 and above), according to the Kenya Food Security Steering Group 2020 Long Rains Food and Security Assessment (LRA). The food security situation in the ASAL counties is reportedly at one of the lowest levels in the last 15 years, with most counties in IPC Phase 2. The situation is projected to remain stable until October 2020. The decline is attributed to the cumulative good performance of the 2019 short rains and 2020 long rains. Crop prospects are reportedly average to very good based on available water requirements except in parts of the southeast and coastal areas. According to the LRA, maize production for the 2020 long rains in the country is projected to be approximately 10 to 15 per cent above the five-year average. However, the outlook for the October, November, and December short rains—critical for crop production in semi-arid areas and pasture regeneration in arid areas—is projected to be below normal with higher than normal temperatures (30 to 60 per cent). This is reportedly driven by rising sea surface temperatures in the Indian and Pacific Oceans, and the possibility of a la Niña event.

Despite the general improvement in food security and nutrition outcomes, malnutrition levels remain high across the ASAL counties, indicative of the multiple and complex underlying causes beyond food security. Nearly 1.17 million children and women require treatment for acute malnutrition, including about 135,500 of them for severe acute malnutrition (SAM), according to the LRA.

In informal settlements in urban areas, approximately 1.7 million people are projected to be currently facing food insecurity due to including, the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on the economy, increased food prices and a decrease in income or the loss of a job.

Following intense rainfall, multiple lakes in Kenya—including Lake Baringo, Lake Bogoria and Lake 94, Lake Naivasha, Lake Turkana, and Lake Victoria—and waterways are at record-high levels, causing displacement and loss of livelihoods for surrounding communities.

Significant progress has been made in the desert locust response and the situation has significantly improved, according to FAO. Out of the 30 counties affected earlier this year, only few small maturing swarms persist in Samburu county, and local breeding could eventually occur in the north-west of the country with the Short Rains. There is a low risk that a few swarms currently in Ethiopia may arrive in the north-east about mid-November while the next generation of swarms that form in eastern Ethiopia and central Somalia are likely to arrive from mid-December onwards. As laboratory testing has recently increased in the country, the number of positive cases has also increased significantly since the beginning of October. A further increase in cases is expected as there is an increase in community mass testing in some areas of Nairobi, according to WHO. Increasing numbers of health workers infected have also been reported. MoH attributes the high rate of infection among private health facility health-care workers to inadequate adherence to infection prevention and control (IPC) guidelines and inadequate supply of personal protective equipment (PPEs).

All the 47 counties in the country have reported COVID-19 infections, Nairobi City and Mombasa county continue to have the highest attack rates of COVID-19 at 511.1 and 290.9 per 100,000 population respectively when compared to the national average of 94.8 and need enhanced interventions. Since 12 March 2020 when Kenya reported the first COVID-19 cases, the Ministry of Health (MoH) has confirmed a total of 45,076cases with 839 deaths (case fatality rate of 1.9 per cent), as of 19 October. About 65 per cent of the confirmed cases are male. Of the total cases, 98 per cent are local transmissions.

As directed by the Ministry of Education, the phase return to school has started with the first groups of classes (Grade 4, Class 8 and Form 4) resuming on 12 October. All schools in the country closed in March 2020. About 20 million children have been affected by the schools’ closure.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Education

20M
children affected by schools' closure
40
agencies in the COVID-19 response

Needs

  • Community communication strategies and back-to-school campaigns are required prior to the re-opening of the schools. As directed by the Ministry of Education, the phase return to school started on 12 October, with the first groups of classes (Grade 4, Class 8 and Form 4). All schools in the country closed in March 2020. About 20 million children have been affected by the schools’ closure.

  • In line with MOE guidelines, schools should develop policies and procedures suitable in their own environment to enable smooth reopening of the institution including all health protocols required in the fight against COVID -19.

  • Device appropriate flexible learning environment by using e-learning and offline learning platforms to cater for those who might miss school due to illnesses and other causes.

  • Radio lessons in urban areas do not cater for learners with hearing impairment. There is need for additional radios, tablets, computers, textbooks and other learning materials, as well as solar lamps, hygiene kits and data bundles, for both refugee and host community students at all educational levels, as limited ownership of personal devices constrains full access to ongoing learning continuity interventions and home/community-based learning. University students need laptops to access e-learning.

  • There is unequal access to technology such as computers, laptops or smartphones, as well as prohibitive internet costs and unreliable internet access, especially for learners from disadvantaged families and marginalized communities. Where the technology is available, there are concerns around young children’s unsupervised internet usage.

  • The long-term impact of school closures are wide-ranging and even more devastating to families living below the poverty line. Learners, particularly girls and young women from vulnerable families, often have to compliment family income by working on farms and contribute to household chores or care work instead of learning.

  • Due to the long school closures, some girls may be subject to SGBV, early pregnancies and early marriage which puts them at a higher risk of dropping out of school; hence educational outcomes for the most vulnerable families will suffer as they have little reason to send their children back to school when schools re-open.

Response

  • A total of 43,384 children (35,073 boys and 8,311 girls) have been reached through remote learning. Out of these, 2,488 (1,295 boys and 1,193 girls) were children with special needs.

  • Education partners reported 19,682 children (4,948 boys and 14,734 girls) reached with school safety interventions, and 16,606 children (3,271 boys and 13,389 girls) were provided with psychosocial messages/services.

  • A total of 5,626 children (1,381 boys and 4,245 girls) were reached with conditional household cash transfers.

  • About 119 (88 male, 31 female) teachers and educational officials were reached; of whom 88 (63 male, 25 female) were provided with financial support.

  • A total of 43,584 (21,678 boys, 21,906 girls) were reached with wash facilities, of whom 10,680 (6,957 boys, 6,675 girls) were provided with improved handwashing facilities, while 3,392 (1,820 boys, 1,572 girls) were provided with soap and hand sanitizers. In addition, 1,572 girls benefited from menstrual support/dignity kits. It should also be noted that there were no schools that had been disinfected.

  • On surveys and tracking, a total of 14,422 (7366 boys, 7056 girls) were reached. Out of these, 1,496 (744 boys and 752 girls) were assessed on the impact of COVID-19 on education, while 10,430 (5,378 boys, 5,052 girls) were reached in monitoring and evaluation activity.

  • A total of 646,969 (81,393 boys, 565,576 girls) children were reached through various health interventions; 2,188 (1,192 boys, 996 girls) children benefited from PPE’s while a total of 512,838 (9,346 boys, 503,492 girls) were reached with dissemination of paper-based materials or home visits.

  • A total of 19,141 children (14,119 boys, 5,022 girls) were reached through dissemination of health-related messages through media such as radio. Further, 3,372 children (1,858 boys, 1,514 girls) were reached through SMS or mobile messaging.

Gaps

  • Need to conduct a gap analysis of the education system and perform a complete reboot in the quest to provide equitable access to learning for all.

  • Students do not have enough radios, textbooks and digital devices for distance learning. The current radio airtime dedicated to distance learning does not suffice.

  • There is a possibility of basic education institutions inadequate capacity to observe the Ministry of Education’s State Department of Early Learning and Basic Education guidelines on health and safety protocols for re-opening of Basic Education Institutions amid COVID -19 Pandemic should schools re-open in October 2020 due to the following:       congested classrooms/dining halls/staff rooms/ and dormitories/laboratories; inadequate clean safe water; inadequate handwashing facilities/points at strategic locations; inadequate age appropriate and gender sensitive toilets and bathrooms;  unavailable or unresponsive referral mechanisms; inability to provide adequate and quality protective equipment for teachers and support staff and PPE’s; inadequate fumigation and rehabilitation of schools used as quarantine or holding centres for COVID19 patients; and inability to construct/renovate/rehabilitate schools destroyed by climate-induced disasters (flooding, mudslides, landslides, strong winds).

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Food Security & Livelihoods

739K
severely food insecure people in August
1.7M
People affected in informal settlements

Needs

  • Food insecurity in the ASAL counties at a macro level is currently at one of the lowest levels in the last 15 years, with 739,000 in IPC 3 and 4, according to the latest Long Rains Assessment (LRA) report. This is attributed to the cumulative good performance of the 2019 short rains and 2020 long rains. ASAL counties are generally IPC phase 2 and this is projected to remain stable until October 2020. However, levels of acute malnutrition remain unacceptably high across the ASAL counties, indicative of the multiple and complex underlying causes beyond food security.

  • Approximately 1.7 million people are projected to be affected in the urban informal settlements because of the COVID-19 pandemic. In urban areas, the most significant shocks usually faced affecting food security are an increase in food prices and a decrease in income or the loss of a job. Female-headed households, who constitute 30.2 per cent of the poor population, are at particularly high risk.

  • Government and partners have identified 725,000 urban poor in COVID-19 hotspots, including Nairobi, Kwale, Kilifi, Mombasa and Nakuru to be targeted through government response.

  • Workers in the informal economy may not be able to stay at home when they are sick without paid sick leave. People living in or near poverty often lack disposable cash and cannot easily stockpile food in times of pandemics. Hunger, malnutrition, pneumonia and other forms of health-related shocks and stresses compound vulnerability to the COVID19 pandemic. In a context where up to 84 per cent of all jobs are in the informal sector (which excludes small-scale farming and pastoralist activities) and the urban poor spend an estimated 50 per cent of daily income on food, the slowdown in economic activity due to movement restrictions has affected their ability to buy their minimum food and non-food needs (KNBS, 2019; KFSSG, 2010).

  • A few small maturing swarms of desert locusts persist in Samburu county, and local breeding could eventually occur in the north-west with the short rains. There is a low risk that a few swarms currently in Ethiopia may arrive in the north-east about mid-November while the next generation of swarms that form in eastern Ethiopia and central Somalia are likely to arrive from mid-December onwards.

Response

  • At least 56,000 households out of the targeted 70,500 households in the informal settlements in Nairobi have been supported with cash transfers to mitigate the effects of COVID-19. WFP plans to reach the planned 70,500 by the end of October. Each household is entitled to a month cash transfer valued at 4,000 Kenyan Shillings (about US$37) over a four-month period.

  • Complementing the Ministry of Health’s efforts to reduce acute malnutrition, WFP will continue to provide vital nutrition support to treat malnutrition among 16,000 children under age 5, 700 pregnant and breastfeeding mothers and 6,800 elderly people in informal urban settlements.

  • Engagement with the national government and the county government of Mombasa in preparation for the roll-out of COVID-19 response in Mombasa is ongoing. The roll-out plan has been finalized and adopted by the County Government of Mombasa. About 24,000 households started to receive cash transfers in the last week of September 2020.

  • WFP in close coordination with humanitarian partners and the Government to ensure this assistance reaches the children, women, men and elderly who need it the most as quickly as possible.

Gaps

  • Funds are insufficient to sustain the monthly provision of a full food ration to refugees in camps. Refugees currently will receive 60 per cent of the recommended minimum of 2,100 Kcal dietary food basket in October/November 2020 food distribution cycle.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Health

45,076
COVID-19 cases (as of 19 October)

Needs

  • The go-slow by health-care workers and general industrial action affected delivery of essential services, including maternal newborn and child health (MNCH) during the reporting period.

  • There has been a 30.5 per cent decline in contraception uptake between March and June 2020 compared to the same period in 2019.

  • Health institutions have reported insufficient medical facilities including, personal protection kits for frontline health workers and community health workers, laboratory testing kits for the mass testing of the targeted communities and high-risk groups, logistical support for the quarantine facilities, and establishment of new quarantine and Isolation centres to respond to the increasing numbers of new cases and contacts across the country.

  • Health authorities have reported reduced uptake of other essential health services amid the COVID-19 pandemic, including for chronic conditions and immunizations services threatening to reverse investments made towards control of communicable diseases, including tuberculosis (TB).

  • Measles outbreaks are still active in five counties: West Pokot, Garissa, Wajir, Tana River and Kilifi. A total of 512 cases have been reported, out of which 49 were confirmed and two deaths (case fatality rate (CFR) 0.4 per cent), according to MoH. There is need for continued sensitization of health workers on the disease and its management and treatment, and distribution of guidelines on measles disease in the health facilities. Improved outreaches visits are also needed to improve immunization coverage for the affected areas.

  • The MoH Ministry of Health has since January 2020 reported an outbreak of visceral leishmaniasis (also known as kalaazar) in Marsabit, Garissa, Kitui and Baringo counties, where a total of 146 cases with seven deaths (CFR 5 per cent) have been recorded, as of 5 September. Health authorities have reported a stock out of visceral leishmaniasis commodities especially rapid test kits, in addition to lack of vector control chemicals and IEC materials, including standard guidelines. There are limited drugs for proper treatment coupled with inadequate knowledge and lack of guidelines and protocol for healthcare workers on case management. Lack of community awareness and knowledge about the diseases and preventive measures has also contributed to its spread.

Response

  • Mental health and psychosocial support are provided to all patients in COVID-19 treatment centres and to those in quarantine facilities.

  • About 810 mama kits were distributed: 110 Turkana County, and 100 each allocated to Homa Bay, Lamu, Mandera, Marsabit, Migori, Narok and Wajir counties.

  • Donated assorted PPEs to health facilities in the Mukuru informal settlement in Nairobi in collaboration with the Wangu Kanja Foundation that supports survivors of GBV.

  • A total of 64,976 women were reached with integrated SRH services (including antenatal and postnatal care, emergency obstetric and newborn care and family planning) in the month of August 2020.

  • About 9,200 adolescents and youth were reached with SRH information and services in the month of September 2020.

  • UNFPA has mobilized resources that translate into prevention of over 1,639,068 unintended pregnancies, nearly 1,939 maternal deaths and aversion of 930,168 unsafe abortions over the next three years.

  • Information campaigns through print and electronic media reached approximately 1,500,000 people.

Gaps

  • Stigma and discrimination against people who have been discharged from quarantine and isolation centres, as well as health workers, are emerging hindering case identification and reporting.

  • Inadequate resources for operations at the sub-national level for COVID-19 surveillance activities, this is glaring at the sub-county level.

  • The long turnaround time for reliable laboratory results to clients in most counties is causing delay in public health action.

  • Uptake of other essential health services have drastically reduced since the COVID-19 pandemic. Key sectors affected are immunization, reproductive health and non-communicable diseases.

  • Complacency by community despite established community transmission now a threat to prevention.

  • Commodity insecurity at the sub-national level of personal protective equipment.

  • Low uptake of integrated digital data management systems especially for the digital case investigation form in the Community Health Toolkit (CHT) and Kenya EMR.

  • Re-emergence of long queues of truck drivers along the major border points of entry and exit with neighbouring countries due to delays occasioned by retesting by Ugandan authorities.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Nutrition

531K
acutely malnourished children
84K
elderly pple in need of nutrition support

Needs

  • According to Integrated Phase Classification for Acute Malnutrition (IPC AMN) conducted in August 2020, nutrition situation largely remained within the same phase across counties compared to the 2019 short rain assessment conducted in February 2020, with major improvement observed compared to the same period last year. The stable nutrition situation is mainly attributed to a stable food security situation characterized by improved milk availability and access as livestock largely remained within the counties and near the households. This is due to favourable forage condition and availability of water for livestock and availability of food stock at household level in the cropping areas, following good rainfall performance .

  • Despite the seeming stable nutrition situation, malnutrition levels remain unacceptably high in the arid counties with serious to critical levels of malnutrition reported. Approximately 531,005 children (boys and girls) with acute malnutrition; 98,390 pregnant and lactating women and 84,000 older persons need services related to treatment of acute malnutrition. This is attributed to poor infant and young child feeding practices, stock-out of essential supplies for management of acute malnutrition and morbidities, coupled with multiple shocks, which have slowed down recovery from the 2019 drought such as floods reported during the 2019 short rains and the 2020 long rains leading to loss of lives and livelihoods, resource based conflict and locusts invasion reported since December 2019. The nutrition situation is projected to remain in the same phase between September and November 2020.

Response

  • The sector has continued to work to provide access to integrated health and nutrition services. To this end, as at close of August 2020, a total of 36,497 and 68,056 children requiring treatment of acute malnutrition had been admitted to the Therapeutic Feeding Program and Supplementary Feeding Programs respectively.

  • On the maternal infant and young child nutrition programme, a total of 1,031,071 primary caregivers of children aged 0-23 months have received IYCF counselling from January to August 2020. While the trends indicate a decline compared to 2019 and previous years, there is a slight improvement in the number of clients seeking care that is attributed to improved availability of supplies (therapeutic supplies) at the facility level as well as sustained communication and social mobilization to counter COVID-19 related fears.

  • Stock outs of ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) significantly reduced with the rates in August 2020 recorded as 1 per cent compared to 20 per cent in February 2020 or Vitamin A supplementation (VAS), a reduction was noted in the numbers reached in the month of August which is attributed to the decreased intensity of the community strategy approach which was accelerated in the months of June and July as part of the VAS catch up following and also in alignment with the bi annual Malezi bora annual campaign.

  • A deep dive into the Integrated management of acute malnutrition (IMAM) was done with a section of county teams in a bid to understand the trends and factors contributing to low admissions. The key drivers identified include significant scale down or suspension of outreaches attributed to funding gap and COVID-19 infection prevention control (IPC) measures, improved nutrition situation across the ASAL counties, stock out of Ready-to-Use Therapeutic Foods (RUTF) of above 14 per cent from January to June 2020 and COVID-19 related fears (based on qualitative data from interviews in LRA 2020) there is still continuous analysis to ensure the sector responses are able to address the fundamental challenges to access in addition to reviewing success of programme adaptations like the use of Family MUAC.

  • In the month, a total of 6,734 care givers from the counties of Turkana, Marsabit, Kilifi, Isiolo, Tana River & Kisumu and from the NDMA Sentinel sites were reached through the approach and are considered capable to screen and refer their own children based on the screening outcomes.

  • The sector has supported the development of Information, education and communication materials inclusive of posters, fliers, guidance notes and animation on breastfeeding, complementary feeding, maternal nutrition, health diets and physical activities as part of COVID-19 response. A total of 7,450 maternal, infant and young child nutrition (MIYCN) counselling cards were distributed to the counties. As part of marking the world breastfeeding week, 47-county nutrition and public health coordinators were engaged in promoting, protection and support for breastfeeding during the COVID-19 pandemic and beyond.

  • Over the reporting period, a scoping mission was undertaken in Mombasa to explore possibility of extending MAM programming in Mombasa County. Mombasa is being considered since it is one of the COVID-19 affected counties, necessitating need to target high risk groups who include malnourished children aged between 6-59 months, pregnant and lactating women with a child less than six months, and the elderly. Support to the Nairobi Metropolitan Service, for the MAM programme is in its second month of actual distribution to the eligible clients.

  • The sector continued with efforts to integrate nutrition education in fisheries and aquaculture programmes. The nutrition sensitive programme focused on promoting consumption of fish, safe fish handling, preservation and preparation. The efforts targeted Government staff, traders and fish farmers from Kirinyaga, Nyeri, Meru, Homabay, Migori, Vihiga and Kakamega counties.

  • All patients in isolation facilities and those in quarantine centres are provided with meals.

Gaps

  • Inadequate PPE to cover nutrition workforce in the counties as well as the community health volunteers.

  • Seeming reduction in COVID-19 cases “flattening of the curve” that could result in increased spread if IPC measures are not adhered to further. An increase would potentially overwhelm health facilities and trigger a second round of effects.

  • Increasing threat to service provision through health workers industrial action. In Nairobi, a strike by health workers paralyzed facilities for a week which further affected access to the lifesaving services.

  • Inadequate funds and commodities to facilitate the scale up of IMAM especially in the non ASAL counties and to cover refugee operations fully remains a challenge.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Protection (Child Protection)

230k
children targeted
12,000
children & parents received MHPS since Mar

Needs

  • Protection partners have reported an increase in emotional, physical and sexual violence against children, with cases of defilement, child labor and gender-based violence (GBV) on the increase as the children remain out of school and many adults out of meaningful employment.

  • A report by MoH, documents 5,000 cases of sexual abuse in Kenya since the COVID-19 pandemic of which 70 per cent are children below 18 years old. At least 79 girls aged 9-12 years have undergone genital mutilation (FGM) since schools closed in March 2020 due to the COVID-19 outbreak in Kenya.

  • Need to upscale case management support to children affected by COVID-19, including provision of mental health and psychosocial support. About 9 per cent of the confirmed COVID-19 cases in Kenya are children and adolescents aged 19 years and below.

  • About 650,000 children need assistance as a direct result of the recent floods and family tracing and reunification with partners calling for strengthened measures to prevent family separation.

  • Upscale advocacy against violence, abuse and exploitation of children especially now that they are out of school for the rest of the year. There is need to expand community level surveillance, prevention and reporting of child abuse cases.

  • Upscale case management support to children affected by COVID-19, including provision of mental health and psychosocial support.

  • Facilitating community support, by working with child protection volunteers and the link between volunteers and children officers, ensuring children at risk are identified, and provided with required support .

  • Provision of COVID-19 prevention supplies and social support to children in institutions.

Response

  • Child Protection sector continued to conduct awareness creation and sensitization campaign on COVID-19 pandemic through local radio at county level and in the refugee hosting areas.

  • Since May 2020, the Child Protection Sector has distributed 5,368 dignity kits in West Pokot, Turkana West, Garissa, Isiolo, Mandera & Marsabit counties to vulnerable households in Garissa, West Pokot and Turkana.

  • Since the first COVID-19 case in Kenya, a total of 25,288 children, parents and caregivers (13,939 female, 10,704 male, 983 gender undisclosed) have been provided with community- or individual-based mental health and psychosocial support by CSOs and Child Protection Volunteers.

  • Child Protection sector continues to conduct awareness creation & sensitization campaign on COVID-19 pandemic through local radio around the country, including in urban informal settlements and in the refugee hosting areas. For instance, the radio talk show at Ata-nayeche FM focuses on child abuse during COVID-19 and referral pathways and has a coverage of approximately 40,000 people within 30 kilometer radius in Kakuma Turkana West sub-county .

  • The Child Protection Sector has developed MHPSS flyers that were distributed with learning material through the Ministry of Education and reached approx. 15,000 children around the country .

  • To date, a total of 318 Child Protection Volunteers (194 male & 124 female) were deployed in June 2020 in 15 Counties to support case management during COVID-19 pandemic and have supported 10,423 children (5,902 Girls, 4,521 Boys). The 15 counties are: Baringo, Garissa, Homabay, Isiolo, Kisii, Kisumu, Mandera, Marsabit, Migori, Mombasa, Samburu, Tana River, Turkana, Wajir, West Pokot.

Gaps

  • Case management is hindered by COVID-19 restrictions, limiting face-to-face interactions and movement.

  • Lack of dignity and relief kits, which are a high priority in counties affected by floods as people return since they lost their property.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Protection (Gender-based Violence)

810
GBV cases received by the hotline in Sep

Needs

  • A study by the Kenya National Bureau of Statistics showed that 23.6 per cent of Kenyans have witnessed or heard cases of domestic violence in their communities since the introduction of COVID-19 containment measures.

  • The national GBV Hotline 1195 received 810 cases in September (as of 29 September 2020) compared to 646 cases in August, an increase of 25 per cent. All cases received psychosocial first aid (PFA) and referral services.

  • A study undertaken by the Ministry of Health and Population Council (April 2020) on COVID-19 Knowledge, Attitudes, Practices and Needs which showed that 39 per cent of women and 32 per cent of men were experiencing tensions in their homes.

  • About 12,000 women and girls displaced and affected by floods need GBV-related services and psycho social first aid, according to GBV partners.

  • About 650,000 women and girls in urban informal settlements need access to basic household supplies and dignity kits to reduce the risk of GBV.

  • About 440,000 girls in counties with high prevalence of female genital mutilation (FGM) require social protection and psychosocial support, including dignity kits.

  • At least 2,350 women and girls across the country need shelters and safe houses for protection from GBV and FGM.

Response

  • A total of 530 dignity kits were distributed in Isiolo (100), Nairobi (130), Narok (50), Kajiado (100), Kakamega (100), Meru County (50) and Migori (100) counties.

  • Field visits we conducted in Kajiado, Kisumu and Kakamega counties to create awareness on SRH and GBV during COVID-19.

  • Nairobi and Kakamega counties were supported GBV survivors at Feminist Centre and women with disabilities at This Ability. Additionally, humanitarian partners took part in filed visit to support male engagement in addressing FGM in Kajiado County.

  • A total of 810 GBV cases received by the national GBV Hotline during the month of September 2020. In addition, 3,428 people accessed virtual GBV education through the hotline.

  • At least 5.4 million people reached with messages on GBV through multiple platforms, including webinars, social media, radio stations and print media since May 2020.

  • At least 9,528 men in nomadic counties of Marsabit, Wajir, Mandera, Isiolo and Migori were reached with advocacy messages on GBV prevention during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • Sustained six tele-counsellors to support county GBV hotlines in Kwale, Kilifi and Mombasa, which have been set up by the county governments.

  • Five shelters (four in Nairobi, one in Mombasa) were assessed and contracted for support to survivors of GBV and are now operational. The shelters are offering accommodation, psychosocial support, pro bono legal services and provision of dignity kits to the survivors .

  • A total of 30 SGBV survivors (27 female and three males) were supported to access pro-bono legal aid services.

Gaps

  • At least 3,000 health care workers and 1,500 police officers still need orientation on GBV and female genital mutilation.

  • Access to justice has been a challenge as the court system is not operating fully.

  • Reluctance by many survivors to officially report violations citing fear of repeated violence as due to uncertainty from enforcement actors.

  • Inadequate access to sanitary wear for over 1.2 million girls especially in rural locations and urban informal settlements.

  • Access to justice was hindered for some survivors of SGBV i.e. use of traditional court system to settle cases hindered justice to women and girls in the North Eastern region. Communities preferred Maslaha System to the Courts.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Shelter & NFI

60K
people in need of shelter support
116K
ppl received shelter & NFIs in 17 counties

Needs

  • Shelter and NFI partners estimate that over 300,000 individuals (roughly 60,000 households) are in immediate need of shelter and settlement support in form of rental subsidies, provision of temporary shelter and non-food items (NFI) and shelter repair support, the needs are spread across the 33-counties affected by floods, landslides and evictions this year, and COVID-19 high-risk counties. People requiring assistance include over 45,000 households across different counties affected by the floods, and over 10,000 households in an informal settlement requiring rental subsidies for at least three months.

  • In the long term, there is need for resettlement in alternative safer ground and shelter reconstruction for displaced population through build back better.

  • Looming emergencies, Turkwel dam is continuing to fill up, while both Lake Bogoria and Baringo are swelling at an alarming rate, this fast-raising water level and Lake backflow could potentially displace thousands of households. The sector is closely monitoring the situation; however, sector preparedness capacity is not at its optimum and requires at least 30,000 NFI to be fully prepared.

  • There is urgent need to put floods mitigation measures in places in the floods-prone counties where communities are at higher risk of exposure to protected community asset and infrastructures from severe damages by future floods.

Response

  • Emergency shelter and non-food items have been distributed to 116,000 people (23,195 households) in 17 counties affected by floods. In addition, registration of additional 30,000 people (6,000 households) were completed and distribution of 6,000 Emergency Shelter and NFI has commenced under CERF funding in six counties and is expected to be complete by mid-September.

  • Camp Management and Camp Coordination on -going in Turkana to boosted emergency preparedness in response to raising Turkwel dam level.

  • Consultations and collaboration with the Council of Governors on ending the cycle of floods emergencies in Kenya towards the allocation of resources for relocation and resettlement of the communities in flood-prone areas to higher and safe grounds.

Gaps

  • Government restrictions related to COVID-19 which have delayed procurement timelines. and infrastructural damages will impair the access and efficiency of the service delivery.

  • The critical funding gaps the Sector is facing is also impairing the capacity to conduct in-depth assessment to ascertain the level of damages to shelter and provide prerequisite technical guidance on resettlement and shelter repair.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

428K
pple reached w/ WASH services or supplies
16M
litres of water provided to informal areas

Needs

  • In West Pokot, Mandera, Garissa, Tana River, Busia and Kisumu County, there are about 5,000 displaced people due to flooding during the March to May 2020 long rains season and indeed of safe water supply and other services.

  • Inadequate IPC WASH supplies for safe opening of schools reported from many counties.

  • New approach for designing risk communication messages on COVID-19 as public attitude towards COVID-19 pandemic change. Members of the public are less cautious of COVID-19 infections with increasing risk of new rising infections.

  • Enhanced WASH capacity at hospitals, clinics, reception and transit facilities, and schools is needed.

Response

  • About 9,000 sanitary pads have been distributed to women and adolescent girls in flood affected in Kisumu, Migori, Garissa, Taita Taveta, Kilifi, Isiolo, Busia and Kakamega counties.

  • A total of US$250,000 released to flood emergency partners including Plan International (Kiilifi and Siaya), LVIA (Isiolo), World Vision (Taita Taveta and Turkana), ACF (Busia and Kakamega) Welthungerhilfe (Tana River) and CARE (Garissa and Mandera) for repair of flood damaged water facilities.

  • WASH COVID-19 response has reached 428,000 people with WASH services (including supplies) in 19 reporting counties against 660,000 targeted.

  • At least 180,000 people in 15 Nairobi informal settlements continue to access safe hand washing for least 20 seconds in line with WHO guidelines in public spaces.

  • A total of 15,000 vulnerable households in Nairobi informal settlements has access to soap for safe handwashing.

  • About 6,500 vulnerable households, including people living with disability, HIV/AIDs, OVCs, and elderly, in Nakuru (1,500), Uasin Gishu (2,000), Kiambu (1,000), Machakos (1,000) and Nairobi (1,000) counties received 20-litre OXFAM buckets for promotion of household handwashing practice. This is in addition to 10,000 vulnerable households already supported in Nairobi County.

  • At least 100,000 people can practice safe handwashing at 1,000 stations delivered to Kakamega, Garissa, Kajiado, Machakos, Kiambu, Kilifi, Busia and Mombasa counties to support additional public handwashing stations in the reporting period.

  • A total od 325 handwashing stations were delivered to Ministry of Education for primary schools in Nairobi Informal settlements in preparedness for reopening of schools.

  • A total of 454 OXFAM buckets (20-litre) were delivered to Nairobi City Government for distribution to 277 ECDE schools in Nairobi in preparedness for reopening of schools.

Gaps

  • Inadequate access to adequate safe water, sanitation services and hygiene information.

  • Lack of maintenance of public hand washing facilities and soap stock outs at public hand washing stations may affect access to safe hand washing practice in some areas increasing risk of infections.

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Kenya

Situation Report

Sector Status

Multisectoral Cash / Social Protection

2.4M
HHs in need of short-term cash transfers

Needs

  • About 86 per cent of Kenyans are worried about not having enough food to eat, especially in Nairobi and Mombasa, which are hardest hit (GeoPoll study). Labour participation rate in the country has fallen significantly from 75 per cent in 2019 to 56.8 per cent in April 2020, largely due to the COVID-19 pandemic (Kenya National Bureau of Statistics survey, May 2020). The percentage of the population n in active employment, whether informal or formal, has fallen to 65.3 per cent of men and 48.8 per cent of women.

  • In September, there were seven reported SGBV cases among refugees and asylum seekers in urban areas, 18 in Kakuma and 58 in Dadaab.

Response

  • A few cash transfers programmes to financially cushion households in during this COVID-19 period have been piloted or expanded in terms of increased transfer value of the benefit. About 3,000 households targeted children released from care institutions to receive an integrated package of child protection services and cash transfers for six months.

  • A quick assessment tool was created to analyse the needs of the children leaving care institutions and the modalities of how the transfer will be provided. A horizontal expansion is currently being planned to target children returning to families after the partial closure of children institutions during the COVID-19 outbreak. About 3,000 households (approx. 16,000 individuals) households in Garissa, Kilifi, Kisumu Nairobi and Turkana are being registered and will be supported with a six-month cash transfer of 2,000 Kenyan Shillings (about US$18), aligned to the National Safety Net Programme (NSNP) transfer value and payment cycles.

  • The UN continues to support the Ministry of Labour and Social Protection (MLSP) to conduct several assessment studies to inform programme development in the post-COVID recovery period. These include: an assessment to demonstrate the socio-economic impacts of COVID-19 alongside an efficacy analysis of the current social protection system; an assessment of the extension of social protection coverage to workers within the informal and rural economies; and the Inua Post post-transfer monitoring. The process of engagement of a consultancy firm for the socio-economic impact analysis of COVID-19 has commence through existing contractual arrangements. The data collection process in the Inua Jamii Post-Transfer monitoring study to analyse the payment modalities and adherence to the prescribed hygiene protocols began on 30 July and continues.

  • Through the Joint Devolution Fund, the UN has supported the vertical expansion of the National Safety Net Programme (NSNP) in five counties (Garissa, Kajiado, Kakamega, Kilifi and Migori) to the most vulnerable households for two payment cycles. About 5,800 households received a cash top-up in August and this pool will increase to 9,734 for the September payment which is currently in process. Beneficiary households also receive nutrition counselling and sensitization messages on topics related to nutrition, adolescent and HIV-AIDS.

  • A horizontal expansion to households with high SAM and MAM indicators in Kilifi and Kajiado counties is ongoing.

Gaps

  • Insufficient funding for the social protection sector to cushion a substantial number of people from the COVID-19 related shocks.

  • Challenges with the Single Registry data, which does not have updated data on children hindering further analysis for expansion of coverage and causes delays in finalizing the design and implementation of interventions.

  • Increased negative social and economic circumstances (job losses, out-of-pocket medical expenses etc.) constrains the targeting mechanisms for social protection interventions.

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Kenya

Situation Report

Sector Status

Refugees

495K
refugees in Dadaab and Kakuma

Needs

  • As of 1 October, there were 252 confirmed cases among Persons of Concern (PoC) to UNHCR , with 83 active cases.

  • Spread of misinformation among refugees and asylum-seekers regarding quarantine and COVID-19 treatment centres leads to some resisting admission.

    Inpatient hospital feeding is required for all patients in quarantine and isolation facilities.

  • Several children need access to psychosocial support to reduce exposure, especially of girls, to gender-based violence, early marriage, teenage pregnancy and other risks. The continued closure of schools has exposed children to risks, such as engaging in illegal activities and early childhood pregnancies.

  • Identifying foster caregivers for refugee children continues to be challenging due to the negative economic impact of the pandemic.

  • Need to improve school infrastructure in preparation for re-opening through provision of additional radios, tablets, computers, textbooks and other learning materials, as well as solar lamps, hygiene kits and data bundles, for both refugee and host community students at all educational levels, as limited ownership of personal devices constrains full access to ongoing learning continuity interventions and home/community-based learning. University students need laptops to access e-learning.

  • School infrastructure (classroom construction/renovation, WASH and other school materials) in the refugee camps needs to be expanded to support school re-opening. In addition, community communication strategies and back-to-school campaigns will be required prior to the re-opening of schools.

Response

  • Community sensitization is ongoing in both Kakuma and Dadaab to encourage the adoption of preventive measures, including mask wearing and social distancing.

  • Kakuma received 130,000 reusable facemasks donated by the US Government. Distribution to refugees and the host community is ongoing.

  • In Nairobi, masks, soap and sanitizers were distributed to residents of the Transit Centre and Safe House, UNHCR partners and community-based organizations, including those led by the youth. Some were also distributed to urban refugee communities in Nakuru and Mombasa.

  • In Kakuma, family mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) screening has been rolled out in over 50 per cent the households, whereby mothers are trained to take measurements of children for safe and timely identification of malnutrition. In addition, targeted screening is being carried out in identified hot spots and follow-up intensified to resolve contributing factors to malnutrition.

  • In Kakuma, the Instant Network School Centres (INS) were reopened to ensure access to learning during the pandemic. ICT coaches were trained on the operation of INS centres and briefed on hygiene measures. Handwashing stations have been installed in the centres and access is controlled.

  • In Kakuma, daily five-hour radio lessons were broadcasted for primary and secondary school and Accelerated Education Programme (AEP) learners. A total of 1,575 secondary school candidates accessed learning materials, and 133 (41 female) teachers were engaged in monitoring student participation in radio lessons. In Dadaab, 18 five-hour weekly radio lessons were broadcasted, reaching 46,372 students (20,850 girls) at primary and secondary school, Accelerated Education Programme (AEP) and Alternative Basic Education (ABE) students. The broadcasting hours were increased from two to five following an agreement with a second local radio station.

  • A total of 1,023 learners with special needs in Dadaab and 651 (227 female) in Kakuma were provided devices, adapted material and guidance to access distance learning.

  • In Kakuma, 190 teachers (56 female) received online mentorship and 41 (12 female) were trained on the Competency Based Curriculum (CBC). In Dadaab, 120 (30 female) secondary school teachers received online training on Protection Against Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA), Child Protection and Safeguarding.

  • In Kakuma, 9,479 revision textbooks were distributed to the 26 primary schools and 4,373 revision textbooks were delivered to six secondary schools. In Dadaab, 39,908 textbooks were distributed to 3,136 (1,262 female) Grade 8 students in 22 primary schools and 1,296 (392 female) secondary school students.

  • In preparation for school reopening, 798 school desks were supplied to 10 schools in Kakuma, while a multi-sectoral team was set up to map out alternative locations for three isolation/quarantine centres currently housed in schools.

  • At least 7,366 households (39,830 individuals) were reached through COVID-19 awareness and sensitization activities in Kakuma and Kalobeyei. In addition, 2,469 handwashing demonstrations were conducted in the three villages of the Kalobeyei settlement. In Dadaab, 126 hygiene promoters carried out community sensitization on COVID-19, reaching 34,257 individuals.

  • In Dadaab, 84 refugees/asylum-seekers (60 per cent female, 40 male) participated in peer-to-peer sessions on gender-based violence, 30 male refugees/asylum-seekers took part in a session on supporting survivors of violence and 55 refugees/asylum-seekers (80 per cent female, 20 per cent male) took part in talks on violence at home. In addition, 14 community health workers were trained on responding to SGBV during the pandemic.

  • A total of 98 vulnerable women and girls in Dadaab and 30 in Nairobi received menstrual hygiene kits.

  • In Nairobi, 30 refugee children were invited to a children’s dialogue to speak about their coping mechanisms during the pandemic.

  • Thirty youths (12 female, 18 male) in Kakuma participated in “YES” a three-day training focusing on SGBV and conflict management amidst COVID-19 pandemic and the role of the youth in prevention and mitigation.

  • Six refugee children, out of the 27 living in children homes, were reunited with their families after successful home assessment. UNHCR continues to support the homes with donations in kind (foodstuff, milk, masks, soap, sanitizers etc).

Gaps

  • Students do not have enough radios, textbooks and digital devices for distance learning.

  • The current radio airtime dedicated to distance learning does not suffice.

  • Additional teachers are required to reinforce schools upon reopening.

  • An additional 100 handwashing stations for public places in Kakuma and 40 hand washing stations for schools in Dadaab are needed.

  • There is need to engage additional hygiene promoters, specifically for the COVID-19 quarantine facilities.

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Kenya

Situation Report
Coordination

General Coordination

  • The Government has earmarked 40 billion Kenyan Shillings (approximately US$377.7 million) in funds for additional health expenditure, including enhanced surveillance, laboratory services, isolation units, equipment, supplies, and communication; social protection and cash transfers; food relief; and funds for expediting payments of existing obligations to maintain cash flow for businesses during the crisis.

  • On 9 April, the United Nations and humanitarian partners launched an Emergency Appeal to support the Government's response to the COVID-19 pandemic in the country. The emergency requirements of the plan, nearly $260 million, have been included in the updated COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan released on 17 July. Only 37.1 per cent of has since been funded.

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