Mozambique

Situation Report

Highlights

  • Multiple shocks, including the conflict in Cabo Delgado, drought in the south, disease outbreaks and COVID-19 are compounding already significant humanitarian needs in Mozambique.
  • At the end of Octover, more than 12,500 people had contracted COVID-19 in all Mozambique’s 11 provinces, and over 90 died from the disease.
  • The escalation of the conflict in Cabo Delgado since the beginning of 2020 has driven massive displacement and increased humanitarian needs. Over 300,000 people are now displaced.
  • The violence in Cabo Delgado is also hampering humanitarian assistance with aid organizations facing important challenges to reach people affected when they need it the most.
  • Low funding is also impacting the humanitarian response. The Appeal for COVID-19 and the Cabo Delgado Response Plan received respectively 25 and 65 per cent of the total required.
Thousands of displaced people arrive in Pemba fleeing violence in Cabo Delgado
More than 10,000 people arrived in Cabo Delgado’s capital Pemba from 16 to 26 October alone, fleeing violence in Ibo, Quissanga and Macomia districts. Photo: OCHA / Sergio Dinoi

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Key Figures

7.9M
people in need (COVID-19 Flash Appeal)
712K
people in need in Cabo Delgado
2.96M
people targeted (COVID-19 Flash Appeal)
354K
people targeted in Cabo Delgado

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Funding

$68.1M
Required (COVID-19 Flash Appeal)
$35.4M
Required (Cabo Delgado Plan)
$17.1M
Received (COVID-19 Flash Appeal)
$23.2M
Received (Cabo Delgado Plan)

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Contacts

Sergio Dinoi

Head of Humanitarian Advisory Team, Mozambique

Saviano Abreu

Communications Team Leader

Mozambique

Situation Report
Background

Escalation of conflict and violence drive massive displacements and increased humanitarian needs in Cabo Delgado

The humanitarian situation in Cabo Delgado Province, in northern Mozambique, significantly deteriorated over the last 10 months. The ongoing conflict in the region has escalated in 2020, compounding a fragile situation marked by chronic underdevelopment, consecutive climatic shocks and recurrent disease outbreaks. The increasing number of attacks by non-state armed groups, particularly impacting the northern and eastern districts of the Province, are driving massive and multiple displacements, disrupting people’s livelihoods and access to basic services.

More than 355,000 people are estimated to be internally displaced in Cabo Delgado, Nampula and Niassa provinces, up from less than 90,000 at the first months of 2020, according to preliminary data from IOM. The numbers continue to increase daily. More than 11,000 people arrived in Cabo Delgado’s capital Pemba from 16 to 30 October alone, fleeing violence in Ibo, Quissanga and Macomia districts. The violence, displacements and consequent loss of livelihoods are also increasing food insecurity in Cabo Delgado. Over 710,000 people are facing severe hunger, including people displaced and host communities.

The overlap of conflict and climatic shocks with pre-existing vulnerabilities in the region—including poverty, marginalization and harmful social and gender norms—significantly heightened protection risks. Women and children are at particular risk of exploitation and abuse, including forced recruitments and sexual violence, in addition to lack of access to education for girls and boys.

In Cabo Delgado Province, internally displaced people (IDPs) are mostly concentrating in the southern districts, due to safety and security as well as access to humanitarian assistance. Aid organizations and local authorities are currently conducting assessments across the three provinces hosting IDPs to identify new sites for relocation or resettlement of people affected by the conflict. The Cabo Delgado Government created, in September 2020, a Provincial Commission for Social Support and Reconstruction to coordinate the efforts and different relocation and resettlement plans at the provincial and district levels, in close liaison with humanitarian organizations operating in the region.

The escalation in violence has also impacted humanitarian assistance when people need it the most. Access to people affected widely reduced in 2020, especially in the northern districts of Cabo Delgado, and humanitarian organizations are facing incredible challenges to operate and reach those who need assistance, either due to the insecurity itself, infrastructure or administrative obstacles. Several attacks reported over the last few months on district capitals (Mocimboa da Praia, Quissanga, Muidumbe and Macomia districts) have forced many humanitarian actors to temporarily relocate from vital hub locations into the southern districts of Cabo Delgado, reducing their ability to assess and respond to the rising needs. At the same time, transport is incredibly challenging throughout the Province, as roads and infrastructure are in poor conditions. Moreover, physical access is expected to deteriorate further due to the approaching rainy season, between November 2020 and April 2021.

To respond to the increasing humanitarian needs in Cabo Delgado, the United Nations and humanitarian partners launched on 4 June 2020 a Rapid Response Plan to support the Government’s National Institute of Disaster Management efforts to assist people affected. The Plan seeks US$35.5 million to allow humanitarians to scale up urgent life-saving and life-sustaining assistance and protection services to 354,000 people until December 2020. To date, around $23 million have been mobilized through the Central Emergency Response Fund (CERF) and contributions from the international community. Later in August, the Mozambique Government created the Agency for the Integrated Development of the North (ADIN), in an effort to address the root causes of the humanitarian crisis in Cabo Delgado, integrating and coordinating humanitarian and development responses.

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Mozambique

Situation Report
Trends
Mozambique - Metuge
A woman washes her hands at shelter distribution for displaced families in Metuge district in Cabo Delgado. To prevent a possible spread of COVID-19, the distribution is carried out in a small group size, keeping social distancing and including handwashing facilities. Photo: IOM / Wolfe Murray

COVID-19 pandemic compounds existing humanitarian needs

COVID-19 arrived in Mozambique at a time when humanitarian needs were already rising due to consecutive climatic shocks in multiple parts of the country and the ongoing escalation of the conflict in Cabo Delgado Province. The necessary restrictions imposed to contain the pandemic compounded the situation, increasing the need for humanitarian assistance. Over a year and a half on from cyclones Idai and Kenneth, more than 100,000 displaced people by the storms are still living in 76 temporary sites across six provinces in the central and northern regions of the country. With limited access to essential services, including healthcare, water, hygiene and protection services, as well as livelihood opportunities, the displaced population are particularly at risk of contracting COVID-19 and suffering the humanitarian consequences of the pandemic. The situation is also concerning for the population of the major cities across the country, as access to clean water and appropriate sanitation is a major challenge for most of the 80 per cent of urban dwellers who live in informal settlements.

In addition, the pandemic is stretching the already fragile health system, with Maputo (City and Province), Cabo Delgado and Zambezia provinces amongst the hardest-hit. At the end of October, more than 12,000 people had contracted COVID-19 across all the country’s 11 provinces, and over 90 people died from the disease. At the same time, Mozambique is also dealing with multiple and endemic disease outbreaks, including malaria in different parts and cholera that has affected almost 1,800 people and killed nearly 30 since January in Cabo Delgado. Critical services—such as sexual and reproductive health care, immunization activities and continuity of care for HIV, tuberculosis, malaria and cholera—are expected to be disrupted as resources shift to the COVID-19 response, potentially increasing maternal and infant deaths. 

COVID-19 is also exacerbating an already alarming food security situation, with an estimated 4 million people facing hunger. The pandemic-related restrictions particularly impacted the economy of the most vulnerable families, adding to the food crisis triggered by drought in different parts of southern and central Mozambique. The loss of jobs and incomes are pushing additional 2.5 million people to severe levels of food insecurity and exhausting their fragile coping capacity. Many families could be forced to resort to negative coping mechanisms, including child marriage and transactional sex. 

The social and economic consequences of the pandemic are leading to increased protection concerns, particularly for women and children. As stressors rise, the risk of gender-based violence (GBV) also multiplies. Those with limited mobility, particularly the elderly and people living with disabilities, already at increased risk of developing serious illness if they contract OVID-19, may face further barriers to access life-saving services due to movement restrictions.

The situation could exacerbate further, as the pandemic persists and most of the related containment measures continue. The State of Emergency that lasted from 1 April until 6 September was replaced by an indefinite Situation of Public Calamity. The declaration, on 7 September under the new Disaster Management Law, was accompanied by a Red Alert, the maximum level of warning decreed in the event of an imminent large-scale threat. In this period, most of the measures against COVID-19 previously imposed, including limitations to social gatherings, public and economic activities, will remain in force. In the meantime, the Government started to gradually reopen a number of services and economic sectors that were closed down during the State of Emergency.

To address the most urgent needs of people affected by the health and social impact of COVID-19, humanitarians in Mozambique launched a US$68 million Flash Appeal to provide life-saving assistance to nearly 3 million people across the country. The appeal supports the Government-led response to COVID-19, addressing both the immediate public health crisis and also providing humanitarian assistance and protection to vulnerable groups whose lives and livelihoods have been affected by the pandemic. Some $16 million are destined for the health sector, and $52 million for urgent support on food security and livelihoods, water, sanitation and hygiene. By the end of October, only 25 per cent of the total requested had been received. 

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Camp Coordination and Camp Management

355,000
IDPs - Cabo Delgado's conflict
95,000
IDPs in Sofala, Manica, Tete & Zambezia

Needs

  • Increasing violence in Cabo Delgado continues to drive massive displacement. At the end of October, more than 355,000 people were displaced across Cabo Delgado, Nampula and Niassa provinces, according to preliminary data from IOM. The numbers are expected to increase further, as a new wave of displacements is ongoing, with hundreds of people arriving every day in Cabo Delgado’s capital Pemba fleeing violence in the northern districts and some islands of the Province.

  • In Cabo Delgado, several newly displaced families are living in collective centres or with relatives and in urgent need of resettlement assistance.

  • In the central region of the country, most people displaced by the Cyclone Idai lost their documentation when the storm hit Sofala Province and one and half year on they are yet to receive new ones, according to humanitarian partners. There is an urgent need to advocate and support the Government with the identification of all families who lost their papers and the due issuance of new formal documents.

  • Criminality, mainly cases of theft, has increased over the last months in resettlement sites across Sofala, Manica and Memba. Thus, training of local community police to strengthen security and order within the sites is needed to reduce criminality and to provide a secure environment to internally displaced people (IDPs) and humanitarian workers.

Response

  • In the north of the country, the CCCM Cluster organized, between August and September, joint site assessments in Metuge, Montepuez and Chiure districts in Cabo Delgado Province and Meconta District in Nampula Province. The coordinated efforts aimed at supporting the Government in improving the living conditions of IDPs. The objective is relocate them from the current collective centres, where they face harsh living conditions, to areas identified by local authorities for coordinated service provision.

  • The cluster has also trained Government officials and workers from Metuge and Quissanga districts on camp coordination and management, to facilitate future resettlement.

  • At least 360 casual workers providing services for IDPs in Cabo Delgado have been trained on prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse over the last month.

  • In central Momzabique, the CCCM Cluster has finalized the demarcation of 1,422 plots for the Cyclone Idai affected population. In coordination with WFP, FAO and INGC, partners have also updated the numbers of families and people living in all Sofala and Manica resettlement sites. A guideline has been developed with national authorities to include regulate the possibility of resettling other families in need in addition to Cyclone Idai survivors.

  • The Cluster is now working with UNDP, GREPOC and DPDTA to legalize the household plots at the resettlement sites in Sofala and Manica provinces and issue their DUAT certificate (right to use and benefit from land, in the Portuguese). This will provide support to partners in constructing permanent shelters.

Gaps

  • In Sofala, only three resettlement Sites in Dondo District will have the DUAT process supported by UNDP. The remaining 26 resettlements sites and 28 in Manica are not included in this process.

  • In Cabo Delgado, continuous assessments to identify the extend of needs and response in hard-to-reach areas are still challenging.

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Education

2,875
classrooms repaired - Cyclone Idai
9,500
school-in-a-box distributed - Cabo Delgado

Needs

  • The escalation of the conflict in Cabo Delgado is pushing hundreds of thousands of children from their houses and further disrupting access to education. In the last two weeks of October, more than 200 boats carrying nearly 11,000 people arrived in Pemba, more than 2,600 people on 22 October alone. Almost half of all newly displaced people are children, dozens of them unaccompanied.

  • In Cabo Delgado, Niassa and Nampula provinces, displaced people sheltering in accommodation centres are in urgent need of basic services, including education, but also water, sanitation and hygiene infrastructures, child protection and psychosocial support.

  • In preparation for schools’ reopening and support to teachers and children living in settlements for internally displaced people (IDPs), at least 100 temporary learning spaces (TLS) must be established and 200 conventional classrooms are needed in Manica Province. In Sofala, 120 TLS are needed, and 8,000 student kits and 250 teacher kits are to be distributed.

  • Further sensitization on COVID-19 in schools, through posters and educational pamphlets as well as community-based radio programs are essential to ensure the safety of teachers, students and their families. In Zambezia, the distribution of radio sets to families will facilitate their access to key information on the pandemic.

  • Although the overall number of children reached through the provision of learning materials in areas affected cyclones Idai and Kenneth surpass those in need, the students are still facing the impact of the storms and now exacerbated by COVID-19. The rehabilitation or reconstruction of classrooms is slow and most children have not received psychosocial support.

Response

  • In Idai-affected areas, central Mozambique, 2,875 classrooms, with capacity for more than 553,000 children, were rehabilitated. In addition, some 934 TLS are providing education to nearly 112,000. The facilities also benefitted from the rehabilitation of latrines that will serve more than 370,449 children.

  • Still in the central region, more than 104,600 basic teaching materials (school-in-a-box) were distributed and over 267,000 students received learning materials. Nearly 14,000 teachers and trainers received training in Education in Emergency (EiE), psychosocial support (PSS) and disaster risk reduction (DRR).

  • In Kenneth affected areas, in northern Mozambique, 246 classrooms were rehabilitated, which can benefit over 13,100 children. In addition, some 114 TLS were built to assist nearly 9,600 children. The rehabilitation of latrines will provide basic sanitation services for about 20,000 children in areas with recurrent disease outbreaks, including cholera.

  • In Cabo Delgado, more than 9,500 basic teaching materials (school-in-a-box) for teachers were distributed and over 24,340 children received basic learning materials. At least 225 trainers and teachers were trained in EiE and DRR and more 360 teachers received capacity building in PSS.

  • On the COVID-19 response, almost 140,000 children are receiving distance education. In addition, about 118,000 families and children received orientations on child protection. More than 101,600 children received hygiene kits and nearly 13,500 children were sensitized on COVID-19 risks. Finally, 36,536 children will have access to gender-sensitive latrines.

  • In Nampula Province, community radio programs led by selected teachers with distance education experience continue in Emakhuwa and Portuguese languages in most districts. In areas with no access to the radio programmes, including Rapale, Mogincual, Moma, Muecate, Nacarôa, children received physical hand-outs of lesson plans, assuring continuity of learning for more than 14,000 children.

  • In Tete Province, nearly 85,000 people, including teachers, were sensitized COVID-19. More than 1 million lesson plans, at least 10,000 in digital format, have been distributed for the monitoring of learning at home. Radio broadcasting is supporting primary education in most of the province, with 2-hour sessions per day. For secondary education, the radio lessons are three days per week.

  • With the support of Oxfam and AMME, 75 primary schools in Zambezia benefitted from the distribution of hygiene packages (buckets with taps, masks and soaps).

  • Across the country, the Education Cluster is also supporting the Government with strategies, policies and guidelines for safe school reopening and continuation of education during the pandemic, including through distance education.

  • In areas affected by drought in Tete Province, 10,000 learning kits for children, as well as 200 recreation packs and 100 teaching kits were provided with assistance from CESC, with UNICEF support, in 10 districts (Tete, Moatize, Angónia, Tsangano, Macanga, Dôa, Mutarara, Changara, Cahora Bassa e Marávia).

  • Still in Tete, in the districts of Cahora Bassa, Changara, Doa, Marara and Mutarara, WFP provides a school lunch to more than 153,000 children. With assistance from CESC, 2,030 menstrual hygiene kits and 20 school cleaning kits were distributed.

Gaps

  • Due to limited access to TV, radio and internet, there are concerns that most children had no access to education over the last months.

  • In Nampula, more than 333,000 children from different levels of education are not receiving the physical or digital lesson plans.

  • In Tete, there are challenges to monitoring the results of distance education. The lack of personal hygiene and school cleaning materials, as well as obstacles to monitoring adherence to the COVID-19 guidelines, pose challenges to ensure the safety of students and their families.

  • Delays on the rehabilitation of schools destroyed by conflict in Cabo Delgado or climate shocks in several parts of the country constrains access to education. Training in PSS needs to be accelerated, as few teachers and children have been assisted. Training in DRR also needs to be fast-tracked so that the school management committees for disasters can make their local plans and be better prepared.

  • In Tete, schools destroyed by Idai and the previous rainy season need rehabilitation to prepare an adequate number of classrooms when the academic year resume.

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Food Security and Livelihoods

632,000
people reached in September 2020

Needs

  • Multiple crises, including recurrent climate shocks (drought and floods), conflict and violence and the impact of COVID19 are disrupting livelihoods across Mozambique and increasing food insecurity in the country. The situation is particularly concerning in the conflict-affected areas of Cabo Delgado, as well as Inhambane, Gaza, northern Maputo and southern Manica provinces.

  • According to estimations of the Food Security Cluster, nearly 4 million people are estimated to be acutely food insecure in Mozambique, due to the third consecutive year of drought in southern and some central regions of the country and the socio-economic consequences of the coronavirus pandemic. In Cabo Delgado, the Cluster estimates that more than 712,000 people require urgent food assistance.

Response

  • Food Security and Livelihood partners are scaling up response, especially food assistance in preparation for the upcoming lean season that starts in November 2020. In addition, livelihood partners are also planning to support farmers during the major agricultural season, starting in October 2020.

  • More than 632,000 people received food assistance in September alone, and nearly 290,000 people were provided livelihood assistance during the winter agricultural season from May to August 2020. An additional 130,000 people are targeted to received agricultural inputs and other livelihoods support between September and December 2020.

Gaps

  • Lack of resources is leading to food assistance pipeline breaks, particularly in conflict-affected areas of northern Mozambique.

  • Food Security needs for COVID-19 and drought-affected areas are not adequately covered and require additional funding.

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Health

1,720
cholera cases in Cabo Delgado
12,525
COVID-19 cases (as of 30 October)

Needs

  • The COVID-19 pandemic is stretching the already fragile health system in Mozambique, where dozens of facilities destroyed or damaged by cyclones Idai and Kenneth are yet to be repaired. Diagnostic laboratory capacity for coronavirus cases is low in all provinces, and more personal protective equipment and training on COVID-19 management are needed in at least 34 health facilities assessed across the country.

  • In Cabo Delgado, the poor state of maternal and new-born health facilities in Ancuabe, Chiure, Metuge, and Montepuez districts, areas hosting internally displaced people due to the conflict in the Province, limit access to care and services to vulnerable mothers and children, according to assessment carried out by UNFPA and WHO.

Response

  • At least 7 out of 11 provinces have a functional COVID-19 testing laboratory. In addition, at least 26 treatment or transit centres have been identified in all the provinces across the country.

  • Partners have also established some 62 influenza-like illness or acute respiratory infections sentinel sites in all provinces, with support from WHO. Each Mozambique province has five sites, with Maputo and Zambezia receiving 10 and 7 sites respectively.

  • Humanitarian partners are also supporting to strengthen surveillance capacity, with guidelines and tools adapted and disseminated in all the provinces and on-site supervision visits conducted in all regions of the country. Rapid Response Teams training sessions have been conducted in Maputo and Inhambane provinces.

  • WHO supported the Government to conduct antibody surveys for COVID-19 in Nampula, Cabo Delgado and Maputo provinces.

  • Humanitarian partners organized in Sofala Province a national workshop on management and logistics for sexual and reproductive health services. More than 30 people from Sofala, Maputo, Zambézia, Nampula, Cabo Delgado and Niassa provinces attended the training. In Cabo Delgado, more than 7,050 women and nearly 2,400 children benefitted from several sexual and reproductive health services through mobile health brigades in six districts, including Pemba, Metuge, Montepuez, Ibo, Chiure and Ancuabe.

  • UNFPA and DKT Mozambique selected and trained 14 community actors in Nampula to raise awareness and mobilize IDP communities adopt family planning methods through mobile brigades in the districts of Nacala-porto, Meconta and Monapo.

Gaps

  • Additional security services for the health centres in resettlement sites are needed, as cases of destruction and theft have been reported.

  • Additional funds are needed to cover operational cost at province and district levels for field related activities.

  • Only two provinces have been selected for the use of GeneXpert platforms for testing COVID-19, due to limited number of supplies.

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Nutrition

67,500
children to require malnutrition treatment

Needs

  • Prolonged and increasing food insecurity in several parts of the country, multiple displacements and the consequent disruption of access to services in Cabo Delgado, coupled with COVID-19 will likely increase acute malnutrition in Mozambique. The situation is especially concerning amongst newly displaced families and host communities in Cabo Delgado Province, where increasing violence is also hampering humanitarian operations.

Response

  • The Ministry of Health and its partners updated the Nutrition Response Plan to adapt it to current needs and to strength continuity of services.

  • Ready-to-use therapeutic food is being distributed as supplemental product to internally displaced people in Nampula and Sofala, with plans to expand the services to support people recently displaced in Cabo Delgado. Meanwhile, integrated mobile brigades resumed in Cabo Delgado to facilitate the delivery of essential health and nutrition response.

Gaps

  • Logistics delays related to COVID-19 is leading to lack of supplies, including essential rehydration products for treatment of severe acute malnutrition, micronutrient powders for food supplementation for children under age 2 and vitamin A.

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Protection

500,000
people need protection in Cabo Delgado
11,000
new IDPs need to be relocated from Pemba

Needs

  • Escalating violence in Cabo Delgado Province is increasing the need for protection services, especially for hundreds of thousands of people displaced by the conflict. Insecurity and displacement, also affecting people in the central region of the country, increase the risk of child abuse and exploitation, gender-based violence, and exposes already vulnerable people, including elderly and those living with disabilities to harsh conditions. Services are being disrupted, constraining access of people affected to life-saving assistance.

  • A new wave of displacement, with over 11,000 arriving in Pemba from the northern districts of Cabo Delgado over the last two weeks of October increases the need for services for people recently pushed from their homes due to insecurity.

  • Child Protection-specific assessments are urgently necessary for an in-depth picture of the situation of children displaced in Cabo Delgado, Nampula and Niassa, at the same time as a scaled up response to assist those fleeing violence.

  • Appropriate psychosocial support services for children within COVID-19 context is urgently needed.

Response

  • The Protection Cluster providing services for newly displaced people arriving in Pemba over the last weeks of October, including through identifying vulnerable cases and information in local languages on existing services and where they can receive assistance and support.

  • The Protection Cluster has fostered the complementary capacity-building work among partners. On the week of 21 September, different UN agencies and NGOs participated in the training of Protection Focal Points, who will be directly engaging with displaced communities in Metuge District, Cabo Delgado. Referral groups training were also conducted in Balama and Ancuabe districts of the Province. In mid-September, the Protection Working Group in Nampula conducted a series of training on internal displacement for local authorities in Nacala a Velha, Memba and Erati-Namapa, reaching over 70 participants.

  • Joint multi-sectoral missions to assess the proposed resettlement sites in Metuge and Chiure districts were conducted at the end of September. The next step is to conduct community engagement exercises to assess the main needs and intentions of both IDP and host communities in Metuge and Chiure.

  • In Nampula Province, following the successful multi-sectoral assessment of Coranne site for the relocation of IDP families hosted in four accommodation centres in Namialo, preparations of the site to receive the IDPs are underway. Community consultations with the target communities concluded on 24 September and the finding will inform the relocation process.

  • The Nampula Protection Working Group distributed essential relief items to nearly 2,200 IDPs. The distributions were carried out in full observance of COVID-19 prevention measures.

  • In mid-September, UNHCR and UN Women conducted the third round of dialogue with women groups in Nampula city. The session was facilitated by OPHENTA and discussions focused on the rights and duties of IDP women and girls. These weekly dialogues involve 12 women per session.

Gaps

  • Visa restrictions negatively impact the effective implementation of protection activities in Cabo Delgado.

  • The rapidly deterioration of humanitarian situation, coupled with the lack of humanitarian access to crisis-affected populations in northern Districts of Cabo Delgado, continue to hinder the effective delivery of assistance to all affected populations.

  • IDPs in Nampula are in need of urgent livelihood opportunities aimed at creating economic self-reliance.

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Shelter & Non-Food Items

355,000
people displaced - Cabo Delgado's conflict
80,000
people received NFIs in Cabo Delgado

Needs

  • The number of people displaced by violence and insecurity, especially in Cabo Delgado Province, continue to increase on a daily basis. At the end of October, over 355,000 people were displaced in Cabo Delgado, Nampula and Niassa Province, more than 10,000 of them in the last two weeks of the month alone.

  • Several families are seeking refuge with relatives or overcrowded collective centres, in urgent need of not only shelter support but also essential household items to minimize their unhealthy and harsh living conditions.

  • Most internally displaced people (IDPs) remain unreached with humanitarian assistance, of which more than 30 per cent are estimated to need urgent shelter support to resettle in safer locations.

Response

  • Nearly 80,000 people received critical household items, including mats, kitchen utensils, jerry cans and other non-food items in Cabo Delgado, Nampula and Niassa. Some 3,755 of them (751 families) received emergency shelter kits, including bamboo, poles, nails, rope and plastic sheeting to construct an 18 square meters shelter.

  • Additional 7,370 emergency shelter kits are planned to assist some 36,850 people across Cabo Delgado and Nampula in the following months.

  • Over 42,500 people are also expected to receive NFI kits across Cabo Delgado and Nampula in the coming months.

Gaps

  • Lack of supplies hampers humanitarian’s capacity to assist the increasing number of displaced people. There is a gap to meet the needs of more than 115,000 people for whom shelter and NFI support is not yet secured.

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Mozambique

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

50%
of people access improved water supply

Needs

  • Prior to COVID-19, hundreds of thousands of people in Mozambique were already in need of water, sanitation and hygiene services. Most of the 80 per cent of urban people live in informal settlements with limited access to water and sanitation, and majority of the increasing displaced population of Mozambique lack access to the same services.

  • The country has been facing multiple disease outbreaks, including cholera and malaria, stretching humanitarian organization’s capacity to assist those in need of assistance.

  • Only half of Mozambicans have access to improved water supply and just one in five use improved sanitation facilities. Of the 1,643 health centres in the country, some 19 per cent do not have access to water, and 17 per cent do not have sanitation facilities for patients.

  • Women and girls are particularly affected by poor access to water and sanitation, which has a detrimental impact on their health and threatens their security, well-being and education.

Response

  • The WASH Cluster is organizing awareness campaigns to prevent COVID-19 in several regions of the country, including accommodation centres and places hosting internally displaced people (IDPs) in northern and central Mozambique. Training and capacity building sessions to community health promoters and workers are taking place in Sofala, Manica, Maputo, Cabo Delgado, Nampula, amongst other regions.

  • Across the country, assessments to identify needs on WASH services are taking place in Sofala, Cabo Delgado, Nampula, Manica and other provinces, with special focus on areas hosting IDPs.

  • In Nampula, the distribution of hygiene kits to positive COVID-19 cases is ongoing in Nampula City and will continue in Nacala-A-Velha and Nacala Porto. At least 34 boreholes were successfully rehabilitated in Nampula Municipality and partners are monitoring, repairing or constructing WASH infrastructures, including handwashing stations, boreholes, water points and latrines in several localities and sites hosting IDPs.

  • In Cabo Delgado, access to safe water was improved in Pemba City through the construction of 27 new water points out of the 30 initially planned and the allocation of five mobile standpipes. Partners also concluded the distribution of COVID-19 response hygiene kits to nearly 30 health centres across the Province. The construction of water supply, sanitation, handwashing basins and laundry concluded in 18 de Outubro and Decimo Congresso isolation wards.

Gaps

  • Due to frequent attacks and subsequent mobility of the population, the WASH cluster is currently not implementing activities in the districts of Mocimboa da Praia, Quissanga, Muidumbe and Macomia.

  • Intersectoral coordination remains a gap for the COVID-19 response.

  • In Nampula, the resettlement of IDPs to new sites is still pending consultation, which delays improvement activities in the sites, including the distribution of hygiene kits donated by UNICEF to the INGC.

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Mozambique

Situation Report
Coordination

General Coordination

The overall humanitarian response in Mozambique is led and coordinated by the national authorities through the National Institute of Disaster Management (INGC) and related emergency coordination mechanisms. The operation and humanitarian assistance receive the support of aid organizations organized in the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT), which includes UN agencies, International and National NGOs, Red Cross and donor representatives. The HCT is supported at the operational level by an Inter-Cluster Coordination Group (ICCG).

For the COVID-19 public health response, the Government formed the Health Partners Group, led by the Ministry of Health with support from WHO and partners. A national COVID-19 Preparedness and Response Plan was developed and a Technical Advisory Team (TAT) formed by experts from WHO, UNICEF, Africa Centres for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), World Bank, USAID, UNFPA was established to coordinate, add quality and harmonize outputs from the various technical working groups. All of these teams are active and continue to function while a similar structure is being implemented through the health departments and Governors’ offices at the provincial level.

Prevention of sexual exploitation and abuse (PSEA) is a central tenet of the response. The PSEA Network serves as the primary body for coordination and oversight of activities related to protection from sexual exploitation and abuse by international and national personnel of UN, NGO entities and associated personnel involved in the response. The PSEA Network provides technical support to the clusters, agencies and partners to ensure capacity building and community awareness on PSEA, access to safe reporting mechanisms and referral of SEA survivors to assistance services.

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