Nigeria

Situation Report
Flash Update

COVID-19 Nigeria: Number of cases doubles in a week to 2,950 cases across 35 states

As of 6 May, a total of 2,950 cases and 98 fatalities have been registered in Nigeria, according to the latest data from the Nigeria Centre for Disease Control (NCDC)

  • The number of confirmed cases reached 2,950 more than doubling from 1,273 cases registered in the previous week

  • A total of 481 cases have so far been discharged after making full recovery

  • 19,512 samples have been tested since the first case tested positive on 27 February

  • A total of 35 (of total 37) states have now been affected

  • Lagos State is the worst affected with 1,226 confirmed cases, followed by Kano with 397 confirmed cases

  • Cases have been registered in all three of the BAY states: Borno (106 cases/14 deaths), Adamawa (14 cases/0 deaths) and Yobe (13 cases/1 death)

  • Despite rising numbers of cases and fatalities, the first phase of the gradual reopening of the Nigerian economy announced by the Federal Government started on 4 May

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Situation Report

Highlights

  • Aid workers reached 5.2 million people in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states with life-saving assistance in 2019
  • The number of people in need of urgent assistance in north-east Nigeria rose from 7.1 million in 2019 to 7.9 million in 2020
  • 3.8 million people are projected to be food insecure insecure during the 2020 lean season
  • Approximately 1 million children aged six to 59 months, pregnant and breastfeeding women across BAY states are acutely malnourished
  • Insecurity is limiting access to some Local Government Areas in the north-east, especially in Borno State
Nigeria Situation Update Photo

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Situation Report

Key Figures

7.9M
People in need of humanitarian assistance
5.9M
People targeted for humanitarian aid
1.8M
People internally displaced
3.8M
People in need of food security assistance
1.1M
People in need of nutrition assistance
1.2M
People in inaccessible areas

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Situation Report

Funding

$847.7M
Required
$581.1M
Received
69%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Peter Ekayu

Deputy Head of Office, OCHA Nigeria

Eve Sabbagh

Head of Public Information, OCHA Nigeria

Nigeria

Situation Report
Background

Situation Overview

The global COVID-19 pandemic is impacting humanitarian operations and access in north-east Nigeria. Movement restrictions and lock downs are affecting supply chains and the delivery of vital humanitarian assistance. Meanwhile, aid workers have been stepping up efforts to raise awareness on preventing the spread of COVID-19 and putting risk mitigation measures in place, such as setting up hand washing stations and building quarantine shelters.

In January and February, security incidents across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states continued to impede humanitarian operations, amidst mounting concerns that humanitarians are increasingly a target.

On the evening of 18 January, the humanitarian hub in Ngala LGA, Borno State was the direct target of a complex assault by heavily armed non-state armed groups operatives. An entire section of the facility and a UN vehicle were burned down as a result of the attack. Protective security measures deployed at the humanitarian hub prevented any harm to the staff who were in the facility.

The UN and its humanitarian partners were deeply relieved by the news that three aid workers who had been abducted by non-state armed groups along the Monguno – Maiduguri road on 22 December 2019 were released on 15 January and are now safe.

In light of both of these developments, the UN and its humanitarian partners reiterated that humanitarians are not a target and called on all parties to the conflict to respect the humanitarian principles of humanity, neutrality, independence and impartiality.

While there was a decline in the number of illegal check points set up by non-state armed groups and armed criminal gangs, a total of ten such incidents were recorded throughout January and February. This continued to pose constraints and hamper the movement of humanitarian goods along main supply routes. Moreover, a number of Local Government Areas, particularly in Borno State, are either partially or totally inaccessible with an estimated 1.2 million people inaccessible to humanitarian actors. The security situation has also continued to reduce access to farmland during the dry season.

In January, the humanitarian community also addressed the needs of more than 540 women, men and children who relocated from Jakana town to Maiduguri, the Borno State capital, due to security operations in the area. The United Nations and its humanitarian partners, in support of the Government, provided immediate food assistance and non-food items. The United Nations and its humanitarian partners appeal to the Government to ensure that all relocations are safe, voluntary and dignified.

In February, the issue of insufficient fuel to operate the generators at the humanitarian hubs in Banki (Bama LGA) was resolved. The Theatre Commander agreed to increase the amount of fuel humanitarians can transport per week from 1,000 litres up to 2,250 litres. This will enable the hubs in Banki to operate the generators up to 24 hours a day and ensure the smooth continuation of humanitarian activities. Despite this positive development, the movement of fuel to power the humanitarian hubs, fuel restrictions and bureaucratic bottlenecks on fuel transport continue to pose challenges to

In March, the 2020 Humanitarian Needs Overview and Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) were finalized. In 2020, the humanitarian community is aiming to reach 5.9 million people in dire need of humanitarian assistance with a financial appeal of $839 million.

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Situation Report
Visual

North-East Nigeria Humanitarian Snapshot

North-East Nigeria Humanitarian Snapshot

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Situation Report
Analysis

Yobe State Humanitarian Situation Overview (January to March 2020)

The trend of displacement in Yobe State in the first quarter of 2020 changed compared to the fourth quarter of 2019. While over 70 per cent of the 5,000 new arrivals in the State in the fourth quarter of 2019 originated from conflict areas in Borno State, only 30 per cent of the 6,317 new arrivals originated from Borno state this first quarter and the majority 70 per cent originated from remote communities in high risk security areas within Yobe State.

Download the full report here.

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Media

Mr Edward Kallon, the Humanitarian Coordinator in Nigeria, statement on the death of an aid worker from COVID-19

I am very saddened to confirm the death of a health worker on 18 April who had contracted the new coronavirus disease COVID-19. Our sincerest condolences go to his family, friends and colleagues who are all deeply affected by the loss.

Despite the risks, this Nigerian health worker was devoting his life to treating vulnerable internally displaced persons who have lost everything during the conflict raging in the north-east. He had no travel history outside of Borno State and made the ultimate sacrifice.

For the full statement click here.

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Media
Ngala Fire

Nigeria: Humanitarian Coordinator calls for joint efforts to decongest camps amid fire incidents and COVID-19 pandemic

ABUJA, 19 April – The Humanitarian Coordinator in Nigeria, Mr Edward Kallon, has expressed deep sorrow over multiple fire outbreaks that devastated the Monguno Waterboard camp for internally displaced persons (IDPs), in northern Borno State, on 14, 15 and 18 April and the International Secondary School camp on 16 April in the town of Gamboru, Ngala LGA, Borno State, near the border to Cameroon.

“My heartfelt sympathy goes to the many vulnerable families who are affected. These are the worst fire incidents recorded in camps for internally displaced in the north-east so far this year,” said Mr Kallon.

For the full press release click here.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Food Security

3.3M
People targeted for food assistance
$212.1M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

Food insecurity, driven by conflict, is leading to population displacements and limiting access to food and livelihood opportunities, and remains the highest driver of need. The Cadre Harmonise analysis in October 2019 indicates that 2.9 million people across the BAY states are food insecure (CH/IPC Phase 3 to 5) - a 72 per cent increase from October to December 2018 post-harvest period findings. Besides, around 3.8 million people are projected to be food insecure in the upcoming lean season (June to August 2020) and considered to be facing states of crisis or emergency (CH Phase 3 or 4).

Response

In the months of January and February, around 1.7 million people received food security assistance. Of these, 76 percent received food assistance and the remainder agriculture and livelihood assistance.

In February, partners concluded data collection for the Emergency Food Security Assessment (EFSA) with a total of 6,340 households across 63 Local Government Areas in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states, despite security challenges, most especially in hard-to-reach areas of Borno and Yobe states. Abadam, Marte, Kukawa and Guzamala LGAs in Borno State remain inaccessible to the humanitarian community and were not covered in this assessment. Findings from the assessment will inform the Cadre Harmonisé (CH) analysis in March. The CH is a government-led framework, supported by various partners to guide food security programming. According to the October 2019 Cadre Harmonise (CH) Analysis, 2.9 million people are currently food insecure (CH/IPC Phase 3 to 5) across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states. These numbers are expected to increase to 3.8 million in the next lean season (June to August 2020) in the absence of sustained humanitarian assistance.

The Food Security Sector (FSS) Harmonization Task Force met in January to discuss harmonizing approaches among food assistance partners. Key recommendations include: the household minimum/maximum size for ‘per capita approach’; average household size per location for ‘per household approach’; and composition of food assistance package with cooking fuel needs included in the transfer value.

Partners continued with dry season intervention activities, targeting over 35,500 households who have access to land and water for irrigation. The inputs distributed to farmers in February included seeds of nutritious vegetables (carrots, tomatoes, and peppers), cereal crops such as rice, and wet-blended NPK fertilizer, whose clearance was secured by the military in December 2019. They will also receive a training on Good Agronomic Practices (GAP) by Community-Based Extension Agents. Partners will conduct post distribution monitoring and share the results.

In January, a total of 20 water points across the BAY states were identified and assessed for rehabilitation for multi-purpose use, including domestic and agricultural activities (livestock and irrigation).

In February, the Food Security Sector (FSS) organized a training on CH Analysis Manual 2.0 for partners from 27 February to 1 March to build capacities in the application of Cadre Harmonize (CH) food security and nutrition analysis framework and strengthen participation of partners in the analysis process at both state and national levels.

The FSS organized a one-day information management and reporting training with 30 partners on the use of the various basic information management, reporting and resource tools on 30 January. Due to the high number of applicants, a second round of the one-day training was carried out on February 27, targeting 15 partners. The aim of the training is to better support partners in collecting data and reporting, so that we can provide better analysis and relevant information management products.

In February, partners distributed fuel-efficient cook stoves to 3,400 vulnerable households across 12 IDP camps in Dikwa LGA, Borno State. Partners will conduct post distribution monitoring in the subsequent months to assess the level of satisfaction and utilization of the new technology.

Gaps

Recent interactions with the military created uncertainties around the use of cash and voucher assistance (CVA) for humanitarian assistance. Restrictions on humanitarian cargo movements continue to affect operations in the north-east. Therefore, the FSS continues to sensitize partners to ensure each organization carries out due diligence and screening of vendors contracted to transport goods for CVA.

In preparation for the March 2020 Cadre Harmonize, the Sector’s Inaccessible/Hard-to-Reach Area Taskforce has conducted data collection targeting new arrivals from inaccessible areas arriving in reception centers or camps in 12 selected field locations in February. This analysis will support proactive planning, resource mobilization and strategic prepositioning of food stocks and advocacy for humanitarian access, to promptly respond to evolving needs.

The security situation, especially along the main supply routes and remote countryside areas, is posing major challenges to the implementation of ongoing deep field activities and has also led to limited or total inaccessibility of humanitarian assistance to some Local Government Areas in the north-east. The security situation has also continued to reduce access to farmland during the dry season. The Sector also started implementing dry season activities later than planned due to delayed certification of inputs meant to be distributed to farmers.

Joint advocacy efforts continue to call on the Government to ensure that farmers and pastoralists have safe and secure access to enough land and that people who return are provided with satisfactory conditions of safety, dignity and security, as outlined in the endorsed Borno Returns Strategy and international laws.

The Sector has continued to coordinate among its partners ahead of the 2020 rainy season farming campaign to ensure complementarity among different actors from the planning stage.

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Sector Status

Nutrition

0.8M
People targeted for nutrition assistance
$90.8M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

According to the IPC Acute Malnutrition (IPC AMN) analysis conducted by the Nutrition Sector in February 2020, the nutrition situation in Yobe and Borno states for the period between January and April 2020 is at phase 3 (serious). This marks a deterioration in the nutrition situation as compared to the period between September and December 2019 which was in phase 2 (alert). The nutrition situation in Adamawa State is expected to remain stable in phase 2 (alert). The deterioration is attributed to increased food insecurity due to poor harvest and poor infant and young child feeding practices including exclusive breastfeeding. 

Response

In January and February, Nutrition Sector partners screened over 2.7 million children for acute malnutrition and referred those identified as severe or moderately malnourished to the various nutrition intervention programmes. A total of 30,323 children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) were admitted to the 617 Outpatient Therapeutic Programme (OTP) centres, where they were treated using Ready to Use Therapeutic Food (RUTF) and provided drugs for any underlying medical conditions. During the reporting period, the OTP centres successfully treated 96 per cent of children admitted.

The Nutrition Sector partners admitted 1,139 children between the ages of six to 59 months with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) with medical complications into inpatient treatment centres (stabilization centres) where they received intensive nutrition and medical therapy. In addition, the centres admitted 313 children under six months who were malnourished and not breastfed, or caregivers had difficulties breastfeeding. Over 90 per cent of children admitted into the stabilization centres were treated successfully and discharged to continue treatment at OTPs or at home for follow-up.

To treat and prevent moderate acute malnutrition, the Nutrition Sector partners provided specialised supplementary foods to children between the ages of six to 23 months. A total of 113,877 and 114,458 children received nutritional supplements in January and February respectively. Children between 24 to 59 months with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) were also treated with specialised supplementary foods (supercereal plus). Partners reached 3,750 and 4,100 children in January and February respectively. In nine LGAs across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe (BAY) states, nutrition partners are implementing Targeted Supplementary Feeding Programmes (TSFP) to provide intensive follow-up for moderately malnourished children. A total of 1,864 new cases in children ages six to 59months were admitted into the programme. During the reporting period 93 per cent were successfully treated and discharged as cured. To prevent acute malnutrition among pregnant and breastfeeding women, nutrition partners reached 61,287 and 59,656 women in January and February respectively, mostly in IDP camps, communities with returnees and host populations directly affected by conflict.

To prevent overall malnutrition and promote appropriate infant and young child feeding and caring practices (IYCF), a total of 26,043 caregivers of children between zero to 23 months, as well as 12,799 pregnant women received IYCF counselling at health facilities. In addition, a total of 309,763 women received IYCF messages through the Mother-to-Mother Support Groups and 11,241 men through the innovative Father-to-Father Supports Groups. To prevent micronutrient deficiencies in the community, a total of 35,225 children between six to 23 months received multi-micronutrient supplement powder either for the first time or during repeated visits.

Nutrition partners reached 4,989 caregivers of children between six to23months and 42,906 pregnant and breastfeeding women with cash and voucher assistance (CVA) to improve the nutrition outcomes of the targeted individuals or households.

Gaps

The main challenges the Nutrition Sector is facing in 2020 includes the disruption of services in Mafa and Gubio LGAs, Borno State due to insecurity. Moreover, partners were forced to put services on hold in some locations due to funding shortages and delays in the delivery of life-saving nutrition supplies to deep field locations due to delayed cargo movement clearances by the military.

The Nutrition Sector will prioritise advocacy to donors to adequately fund partners to ensure continuity of services in current intervention areas and scale-up services in Yobe and Adamawa states to ensure optimal geographical and programmatic coverage. In addition, partners will engage both INGO and NNGOs, as well as work closely with the State Primary Health Care Development Agency (SPHCDA) to fill gaps in locations where some partners stopped providing services for example in Central Mafa.

The Sector is in the process of finalising the Nutrition Sector three-year Strategy and Response plan. The Sector will continue to improve the quality of the response through more regular joint monitoring and supervision sessions. The monitoring of the nutritional situation through various surveys will start in March, which will include both quantitative and qualitative indicators to understand the various underlying causes of acute malnutrition.  

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Health

4.0M
People targeted for health assistance
$86.2M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

On the 28 February 2020, the Nigerian Federal Ministry of Health announced the first confirmed case of COVID-19 in Nigeria. Currently, four laboratories in Nigeria can diagnose COVID-19. In addition to the NCDC National Reference Laboratory, this includes the Virology Laboratory of Lagos University Teaching Hospital; Irrua Specialist Teaching Hospital and African Centre for Genomics of Infectious Diseases in Ede, Osun State.  

Between January and 16 February 2020, a total of 673 suspected measles cases with one associated death (case fatality ratio 0.2 per cent) were reported in the BAY states. Borno State accounts for 57 per cent of suspected measles cases reported from across the three States. The most affected age group included children under the age of ten years, accounting for over 65 per cent of the population affected. Regarding the ongoing Lassa Fever outbreak in Borno State, 21 cases were reported as of 29 February with two associated deaths. Two suspected yellow fever cases were reported through the Early Warning, Alert and Response System (EWARS) from Gumsuri Clinic in Damboa LGA and Jaragol Clinic (1) in Bayo LGA.

Through EWARS, two cases of acute bacterial meningitis were reported from UMTH in Jere LGA (Borno State) and one suspected meningitis case from the Chibok General Hospital in Chibok LGA (Borno State). 

Response

World Health Organization supported the Borno State Ministry of Health (SMoH) and other health partners in drafting a State preparedness plan for the COVID-19 outbreak. Thematic areas considered included surveillance and contact tracing, point of entry, case management, infection prevention and control, risk communication and State level coordination structures and mechanisms.

As part of the EU-funded early recovery project with multi-sectoral interventions package in Borno State, the international consortium of partners renovated 12 Primary Health Care Centres in Askira-Uba and Hawul LGAs as well as at Askira-Uba General Hospital. The project aims to build the resilience of conflict-affected people and public sector institutions in Borno State in an environment friendly-way, which will help to sustainably improve availability, access and usage of quality basic services (health, education, nutrition and WASH). The rehabilitation work on Monguno General Hospital is progressing well.

Gaps

Funding from the European Union is ongoing for the joint UNDP and WHO project on Integrated Community Recovery and Resilience in Borno State. The overall objective of the project is to contribute to rebuilding the resilience of conflict-affected people and communities in the State using sustainable approaches. The project focuses on the reconstruction and rehabilitation of health facilities in six locations: Bama, Biu, Gwoza, Mungono, Mafa and Konduga LGAs.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Child Protection Sub-Sector

1.1M
People targeted for child protection
$22.8M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

The physical and psychological well-being of children in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states remains at risk due to the complex and protracted conflict. With the ongoing armed conflict in north-east Nigeria, children continue to be recruited and used by armed groups; others have been abducted, maimed, raped and killed.

Response

A total of 86 boys formerly associated with non-state armed groups, who were released from administrative custody in November 2019, were reunified with their families and caregivers and will receive reintegration support within their communities.

With the support of the Global Child Protection Area of Responsibility, the Child Protection Sub-Sector (CPSS) launched a six-month remote learning initiative for selected national NGOs to increase their knowledge and skills on community-based reintegration for boys, girls and young people formerly associated with armed groups and other vulnerable children affected by the conflict in north-east Nigeria.

The CPSS in collaboration with CBM Nigeria, a disability inclusion organization, conducted training for 24 child protection partners to enhance their knowledge and skills on disability inclusion in all stages of child protection programming including design, implementation and evaluation.

Through the LGA-level child protection coordination mechanisms, the CPSS conducted service mapping to facilitate referrals of child protection cases and support the development of referral pathways. In January and February, this service mapping covering Bama, Dikwa, Konduga and Ngala LGAs of Borno State was disseminated to child protection and other humanitarian actors.

Gaps

The CPSS will conduct a workshop to enhance knowledge and skills on delivering accountability through participation for child protection actors in Borno State. The CPSS and the Food Security and Livelihoods Sector will conduct a joint workshop to improve field-level integration of child protection in food security and livelihoods programming. The CPSS will carry out field testing of visual child protection messages which were developed with the support of Translators Without Borders. The field test, among children and other community members, will assess whether the materials are appropriate and understandable for the intended target audiences.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Gender-Based Violence Sub-Sector

1.3M
People targeted for GBV assistance
$28.9M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

In Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states, violence against women, men, girls and boys, including sexual violence, exposure to trafficking and abduction is widespread but grossly under-reported as survivors are exposed to serious risks which compromise their safety, well-being and basic rights. Forced and early marriage is reportedly used as a tool to alleviate households’ economic burden and is viewed as a protective measure to deter armed opposition groups from abducting unmarried girls. Other negative coping mechanisms also include reports of survival sex and prostitution.

Response

In January and February, GBV partners reached 14,148 individuals with GBV case management and GBV specialised services including medical care, psychosocial support, legal assistance and safety options. A total of 4,637 women and girls affected by displacement received dignity kits, containing materials to maintain feminine and menstrual hygiene. Meanwhile, 7,716 individuals received training to build skills and participated in empowerment programmes through women and girls’ friendly spaces.

To strengthen GBV referrals and improved incident data collection, analysis and dissemination, 31 frontline staff in Maiduguri and Monguno, Borno State were trained in GBV Information Management Systems. The Sector also conducted a field roll out exercise for the GBV Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) in two IDP camps in Maiduguri. GBV Sub-Sector (GBVSS) partners also benefitted from training on gender in humanitarian action to strengthen the capacity of humanitarian practitioners across sectors, to design and implement interventions that promote gender equality, and to align with relevant global humanitarian accountability frameworks.

The GBVSS supported the ISWG to collect data for the multi-sectoral GBV safety audit across nine LGAs in Borno State to enable humanitarian actors to determine observable risks and assess specific vulnerabilities of women, girls, boys and men to those identified risks.  The GBVSS is continually supporting the analysis of data with each Sector to form a joint understanding of risks and to identify actions that could reduce those risks and/or vulnerabilities.  In addition, Sector level discussions were held on how the food security and livelihoods response (particularly food distribution activities) could be a vehicle for sensitization on early marriage. Additional discussions with the Child Protection Sub-Sector (CPSS) aimed to improve partners’ understanding of the Prevention of Sexual Exploitation and Abuse (PSEA) framework for reporting and their responsibilities to prevent and respond to SEA.

Gaps

In the coming month, GBV partners will conduct both joint and agency-level activities to commemorate International Women’s month under the global theme of strengthening action to promote gender equality. GBV and CP sub-sectors in collaboration with the Food Security Sector (FSS) Sector will conduct a training for FSS partners on mainstreaming GBV and child protection.  The endorsement and implementation of the inter-agency PSEA Standard Operating Procedures (SOPs) will also be included as a key discussion agenda for the Humanitarian Country Team.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Mine Action Sub-Sector

0.6M
People targeted for mine action
$7.8M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

Given that up to 20 per cent of explosive hazards do not explode on impact and after over a decade of conflict in the north-east, about 1.5 million people in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states are facing dangers posed by IEDs, landmines of an improvised nature, and explosive remnants of war in some of the LGAs. The dangers caused by explosive ordnances affect civilians’ lives, physical integrity and psychosocial well-being.

In January and February 2020, 22 improvised explosive devices (IED) and six explosive remnants of war (ERW) incidents claimed the lives of 34 civilians and injured 64 civilians. One incident occurred on the Gamboru-Ngala bridge in Borno State that links to Fotokol in Cameroon where an unidentified explosive device detonated. The explosion killed 15 civilians and injured 28 others. While traveling on three different roads in Konduga and Dikwa LGAs, Borno State, other civilians have suffered from improvised mines.

Response

During this reporting period, the Mine Action Sub-Sector (MASS) reached a total of 19,546 people through explosive ordnance risk education (EORE) and explosive ordnance awareness (EOA) respectively. A total of 19,522 individuals (5,275 girls, 4,852 boys, 5,729 women, and 3,696 men) through 403 sessions on Explosive Ordnance Risk Education delivered to IDPs, host community, residents and returnees in 17 LGAs across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states. Also, 24 UN personnel (four women and 20 men) received Explosive Ordnance Awareness training.

Gaps

However, funding remains a challenge since most operations are delivered through Community Liaison Teams. It is essential for these partners to maintain capacity to reach communities. The Sub-Sector will continue to inform the donor community and the Humanitarian Country Team on the need for mine action. Efforts to ensure accurate information and knowledge management concerning threats and vulnerabilities will be maintained and reinforced through harmonized data management.

The MASS will continue to provide explosive ordnance risk education activities to the target population of IDPs, returnees and host communities and humanitarian workers. Partners will continue to carry out non-technical surveys (NTS). The Sub-Sector will also train the National Emergency Management Agency (NEMA), the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) and national NGOs conduct Explosive Ordnance Risk Education and non-technical surveys to better reach local populations with life-saving information on explosive hazards.

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Sector Status

Early Recovery

1.6M
People targeted for early recovery
$104M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

The protracted conflict across BAY states has eroded coping mechanism, weakened resilience and increased vulnerabilities of displaced populations. Multi-sector needs assessment (2019) indicated that there are inadequate levels of access to basic services and public infrastructure relative to the population size, limited income sources and livelihood opportunities, and increased resource demands. This deprivation has led to societal tensions between IDPs, returnees and host communities and resulted in increased hardships for displaced populations.

Response

Between January and February, Early Recovery and Livelihood partners continued to rehabilitate and reconstruct public infrastructure to increase access to basic services. In Mafa LGA, Borno State partners are in the process of renovating two buildings at  Mafa primary school. In Monguno LGA, a project to construct a solar powered borehole construction is 70 per cent completed while reconstruction of the Monguno General Hospital is 65 per cent completed. In Konduga LGA, partners have finished 60 per cent of renovation work at Chabal Health Clinic, meanwhile Konduga Secondary School is also under construction. In Gwoza LGA, demolition and construction work at Gwoza Maternal & Child Health Clinic is 80 per cent completed. In Biu LGA, partners are expanding building structures at Biu General Hospital including a paediatric ward, a maternity complex, a laboratory and an emergency room. In Hawul LGA, construction work on the Kwajaffa Health Post is nearly finished. Sector partners in Yobe State competed the construction of protected reservoirs to collect spill over water from boreholes, as well as fencing in ten communities to support agricultural production. Reconstruction work has benefited approximately 5,428 residents of Borno State (1,303 women and 4,023 men) through cash-for-work activities to stimulate economic recovery and build resilience.

In Monguno town, approximately 725 people (359 women and 366 men) now have access to improved basic sanitation facilities following the construction of four multifamily latrine units in Fulatari host community. Additionally, three blocks of latrines/showers were completed at Monguno General Hospital and some 600 people will be able to use these facilities. In addition, 300 individuals will have access to four cabin latrines and two slaughterhouses in the wood market, in Ngala LGA, Borno State once ongoing construction is finished. Partners are also rehabilitating and installing three solar powered water points in Askira and Hawul LGA.

In addition, Early Recovery partners continued verification processes to employ 3,306 people (733 women and 2,573 men) through cash-for-work to participate in a waste management clean up exercise in MMC, Bama and Biu LGAs.

During the reporting period, partners trained 27 men and 19 pregnant and breastfeeding mothers in Yobe State on vocational and business skills including entrepreneurship. Additionally, approximately 1,125 people (673 women and 452 men) in Borno and Adamawa states completed vocational skills training on tailoring, embroidery, handcraft and leather works, brick making, baking, carpentry, hair dressing and mechanics. They also received start-up kits to establish their own small-scale businesses. In Jere LGA, 21 people (one woman and 20 men) began vocational skills and acquisition training to repair and maintain water pumps. Each trainee will receive a start-up kit worth NGN 120,000 Naira  upon completion.

In Adamawa State, Sector partners held meetings in 21 Village Savings and Loans Associations (VSLAs) with 498 members (48 men and 450 women) to discuss their shared dividents. A total of 394 members (370 women and 24 men) members purchased 2,696 shares worth 568,900 Naira ($1,575.9 USD), with a total of 48,750 Naira ($135 USD) saved as social funds. This VSLA has created economic opportunities to access money to expand their existing businesses. In Adamawa state, Sector partners distributed conflict-sensitive educational and communication materials to 7,750 children in both primary and secondary schools, while 216 teachers received training on psychosocial class management and record-keeping.

Sector partners aired seven episodes of a phone-in-radio programme (Dandalin Manoma) on Gotel Radio Station in Yola, Adamawa State on a weekly basis to raise awareness of issues related to inter-communal conflict between pastoralists and farmers. A total of 132 episodes have aired since the programme started in August 2017. During the  programme the Chairman for Police Community Relations Committee and the Director of the Adamawa State Engineering Department reiterated the need for community members to work with Government to gather and share information on security threats, as well as to support farmers by grant their animals pathways to access water sources.

 

Gaps

The Sector faced challenges due to the unpredictable security situation in the BAY states, which led to the postponement of recovery and resilience activities in many locations. In January, one partner relocated their staff from Geidam and Yunusari LGAs in Yobe State to Gashua LGA due to security risks. Partners are also experiencing delays in receiving approval from the EFCC to move with money to the field to pay service providers.

The Early Recovery Sector will continue providing technical support to partners to implement recovery and resilience activities. The interventions will include cash-for-work payments; unconditional cash distributions; support for the establishment of small business enterprises; vocational and business management trainings; support for livelihood and economic recovery; and rehabilitation of basic infrastructure. About 27 community buildings and nine water points will be rehabilitated in Geidam and Yunusari LGAs. Approximately 900 youth will benefit from cash grants to scale up small business enterprises.

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Sector Status

Emergency Telecommunications

100
Organizations targeted

Needs

In 2020 the Emergency Telecommunications Sector (ETS) will continue to provide critical Information Technology and Communication (ICT) services for the humanitarian community to enable the delivery of life-saving assistance in the deep field in Borno State and the state capitals of the BAY states where telecommunication services are lacking or were destroyed in the conflict. This includes coordination and information management services to ensure a coherent response and minimise duplication of efforts by sharing ETS information products, including dashboards, situation reports, and infographics, timely disseminated among global and local partners, and posting online at the Nigeria ETCluster.org platform.

Response

Since the beginning of 2019, the Emergency Telecommunications Sector (ETS) in Nigeria has provided Internet connectivity services to more than 2,455 users from 90 organizations at eight humanitarian hubs across Borno State– Bama, Banki, Damasak, Dikwa, Gwoza, Maiduguri, Monguno and Ngala. In January and February, the ETS completed the installation of audio conference kits at all of the hubs across north-east Nigeria, which will enable staff to communicate and improve the coordination of humanitarian activities between hubs.

In January, the ETS conducted a mission to Yola, Adamawa State to upgrade the security communications network and Security Operations Centre (SOC). In February, the team programmed 68 handheld radios for humanitarians from 12 organizations to ensure their safety and security in the field. The ETS also held a session on security communications for humanitarians during the Safe and Secure Approaches in Field Environments (SSAFE) training in Maiduguri.

Gaps

The ETS faced challenges due to the deteriorating security situation in the north-east. The ETS had to postpone its missions, including maintenance activities, training and deployment of equipment, to deep field locations. The ETS also faced a funding shortage that affected its planned activities for January and February. As of end of February, no funding had been received. This year, the ETS requires a total of $2.9 million to carry out its projects.

The ETS is preparing to install a hybrid solar-based power system to provide sustainable power supply at all humanitarian hubs. Currently, humanitarian hubs rely solely on fuel-powered generators. The use of solar power will help resolve fuel shortages that impact the generators' power supply.

The ETS team will conduct missions to Bama and Banki to train hub managers on the newly deployed audio-conferencing kits, as well as to carry out maintenance on Internet connectivity equipment. The ETS also plans to continue the configuration and testing of the advanced features of the Digital Mobile Radio (DMR), which is equipped with staff and vehicle tracking devices. The ETS will continue programming radios for humanitarian staff to improve communication and facilitate life-saving activities.

The ETS will conduct a series of training courses in security communications for UN and NGO staff. The ETS is also preparing for an assessment mission to identify potential projects to provide communications services to affected populations.

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Nigeria

Situation Report
Analysis

Nigeria: Access constraints drive up humanitarian needs

A total of 7.9 million people in Nigeria – more than one in two people in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states – need humanitarian assistance in 2020.

Humanitarian organizations have faced increased access constraints and security-related incidents that hamper more effective humanitarian response in the three states. With the upsurge in attacks over the past year, and specifically in recent months, aid organizations were forced to scale down activities and temporarily withdraw their staff in some areas.

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Nigeria

Situation Report
Analysis

Civil Military Coordination

In January and February, Illegal Vehicle Check Points (VCPs) set up by non-state armed groups and armed criminal gangs continued to pose security constraints and hamper the movement of humanitarian goods along main supply routes. Incidents were reported on roads connecting Bama-Pulka, Maiduguri – Ngamdu, Benisheikh – Wajiro, Pulka – Gwoza, Gajiram – Monguno, Maiduguri -Ngamdu, Dapchi-Damaturu and Damasak-Gubio.

During the months of January and February, organizing regular CMCoord meetings proved challenging due to insecurity. Fuel restrictions and bureaucratic bottlenecks on fuel transport continue to pose challenges and impede humanitarian operations.

In February, longstanding security issues preventing nearly 400 vacant shelters from being allocated in Monguno LGA were resolved through discussions between the military and humanitarian partners. This resolution allowed for the allocation of shelters to start on 26 February and the process is still ongoing.

Security concerns limited travel to the deep field to hold CMCoord discussions at the LCG level. Meanwhile, weekly meetings between OCHA CMCoord, Sector Leads and the CIMIC officer at the Theatre Command were regularly postponed, causing a delay in resolving key issues with the military. Monthly CMCoord meetings at Abuja level were held, however participation was low.

The movement of humanitarian cargo was hampered by additional requests for vendor, contractor, vehicle and driver details made by the military. This issue was raised and a new procedure was agreed upon and shared with the Theatre Command for approval.   

In February, the issue of insufficient fuel to operate the generators at the humanitarian hubs in Banki (Bama LGA) was resolved. The Theatre Commander agreed to increase the amount of fuel humanitarians can transport per week from 1,000 litres to 2,250 litres. This will enable the hub in Banki to operate the generators up to 24 hours a day and ensure the smooth continuation of humanitarian activities.

Despite positive developments in the movement of fuel to power the humanitarian hubs, at the time of reporting, each weekly quota has to be negotiated separately with the Theatre Commander. Amidst a deteriorating security situation and an escalation of a health care crisis, it is critical that healthcare facilities and hubs have adequate and regular supplies of fuel to save lives.

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Nigeria

Situation Report
Feature
UN Nigeria Ambulance Donation

Nigeria: UN donates ambulances as part of COVID-19 response

The United Nations donated three ambulances to Lagos State in Nigeria on 8 April, as part of its support to Government led-efforts in curbing the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic in the most populous city in Africa. 

Other essential preventive, testing and treatment equipment has also been procured by the UN and is expected to arrive Nigeria soon.

So far, some 254 cases of COVID-19 have been recorded in Nigeria, twice the number from a week ago, and six people have died.       

Lagos, with population of 21 million people with many living in overcrowded neighbourhoods, has recorded the highest number of COVID-19 cases in the country, with 130 cases confirmed.

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Nigeria

Situation Report
Emergency Response
Ngala Nigeria Fire Outbreak

Nigeria: At least 14 killed and 8,000 affected in Ngala camp fire

At least 14 people were killed and 15 others wounded in a major fire outbreak that ravaged the International School (ISS) IDP camp in Ngala LGA on 16 April.

The fire reportedly started around 10.00 a.m. from a cooking point, spreading and destroying over 300 shelters and one communal shelter before it was put out. More than 8,000 IDPs were directly affected with homes, property and valuables lost to the inferno. The wounded IDPs are receiving treatment at the camp clinic run by partners.

Aid workers and government authorities started a rapid assessment of the impacts and are currently mobilizing support, particularly shelters, food and NFIs for the affected people. ISS camp, which hosts over 40,000 IDPs is one of two major camps and several host communities in Ngala LGA which shares a border with Cameroon and continues to receive influx of new arrivals from neighbouring LGAs (such as Kala Balge), as well as refugees crossing back from Cameroon.

Despite the scale up of sensitization and awareness programmes on fire outbreak prevention and mitigation measures by partners, the congestion of camps, further exacerbated by the daily influx and clustering of makeshift shelters (mostly made from dry and flammable raffias), increases the risks of fire incidents.

Partners continue to advocate for the allocation of additional lands to allow for the construction of new shelters to decongest camps across the state.

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Nigeria

Situation Report
Feature
NHF Workshop Nigeria

Nigeria Humanitarian Fund Strengthens Skills of 30 Emergency Local Organisations in North-East

Thirty staff members of Nigerian CSOs providing life-saving assistance in crisis-affected Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states were trained on 26 February by the UN Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA) in project monitoring and reporting for the Nigeria Humanitarian Fund (NHF). The workshop aimed to build the skills of Nigerian organisations that play a vital role in responding to the needs of some of the most vulnerable people in the country.

“The workshop provided us with the skills needed for narrative and financial reporting, including data collection, monitoring and evaluation. It is great to partner with such a fund, as it is a window for us to provide the most urgent basic services to people most in need,” said James Tizhe Siggi, Programme Manager at the Nigerian non-governmental organisation Agaji Global Unity Foundation (AGUF), and a board member of the National Association of NGOs (NANGO), in Adamawa State. “The international community, and especially the United Nations, are extremely supportive of the national NGOs in Nigeria.”

The NHF national partner workshops, though focusing primarily on the NHF’s processes, are intended to more broadly expand their technical expertise, knowledge, and capacity.

“This was the first in a series of capacity support workshops for NHF national partners. While international NGOs can draw on the technical expertise and knowledge of a regional or headquarters office, national partners do not have access to such re-sources,” explained Elizabeth Whitehead, Pooled Fund Manager at OCHA Nigeria. “By including participants working on both programme and finance aspects of their organization, this workshop enabled the two technical areas to understand more clearly how their work is related.”

In 2019, the NHF prioritized strengthening and elevating engagement of national civil society organizations. A total of 41 organisations are now eligible partners for the NHF, among which 44 per cent are national NGOs. The NHF funded 19 national NGO partner projects in 2019.

“NHF is a really important source of funding for us as local organizations. It gives us the opportunity to strengthen ourselves as organisations as it allows us to include organizational development in our budget lines, unlike some other funds,” highlighted Kingsley Okbapi, Programme Manager for Jireh Doo Foundation (JDF). “The OCHA Nigeria team managing the fund has really done a lot of work to give local organisations a chance to access funding. This has a direct and positive effect on people in need as we directly implement projects and provide assistance, being the closest to the most vulnerable people in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states.”

In 2019, the NHF prioritized life-saving assistance to people arriving from areas where violent attacks regularly occur, and to internally displaced persons as well as host communities. In October 2019, the NHF announced a supplementary funding allocation of US$18.2 million to provide urgent aid in significantly under-funded areas such as water, sanitation and hygiene or protection.

Seventeen donor countries and the United Nations Foundation (UNF) have contributed $99 million to the NHF since it became operational in May 2017. This generous support enabled $24 mil-lion in 2017; $36 million in 2018 and $28.1 million in 2019 to be allocated to provide urgent and life-saving humanitarian aid to the most vulnerable people in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states.

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