Nigeria

Situation Report

Highlights

  • Needs will remain high for vulnerable people in 2021 and 8.7 million people will require urgent assistance
  • Up to 5.1 million people risk being critically food insecure during the next lean season (June - August 2021), a level similar to 2016-2017 when famine was looming over Borno State
  • The UN Central Emergency Fund has allocated $15 million for urgent food aid. The Humanitarian Coordinator has called for the international community to follow and step up support
  • Nigeria is now facing a second wave of COVID-19 infections. Borno, Adamawa, Yobe states have recorded new cases. Aid actors are intensifying actions and prevention measures
  • Despite challenges, aid workers had already provided around 5 million people with life-saving assistance in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states in 2020.
Yagana Bulama,  IDP from Marte living in Custom House
November 2020, Custom House IDP camp, Jere LGA, Borno State: Yagana Bulama, 20 years old, is from Mafa LGA. She now lives in Custom House camp, one of the many overcrowded camps for internally displaced persons around Borno State capital, Maiduguri. Life in the camp is not easy. She doesn’t have any other clothes and no soap to wash these ones. At the moment, she also doesn’t have much food and her baby has lost a lot of weight. She heard the situation in her village might be better but her house was destroyed and she would not receive food anymore, so she prefers to stay here in overcrowded, difficult conditions. Photo: OCHA/Eve Sabbagh

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Situation Report

Key Figures

8.7M
People in need of humanitarian assistance
6.4M
People targeted for humanitarian aid
1.7M
People internally displaced
5.1M
People in need of food security assistance
1.5M
People in need of nutrition assistance
1.0M
People in inaccessible areas

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Situation Report

Funding

$1B
Required
$303.1M
Received
30%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Trond Jensen

Head of Office, OCHA Nigeria

Christine Cool

Head of Public Information, OCHA Nigeria

Nigeria

Situation Report
Background
Children in Custom House
November 2020, Custom House IDP camp, Jere LGA, Borno State: Children in Custom House IDP camp. Some 1,080 Households live in Custom House IDP Camp, one of the many crowded camps for internally displaced people in Borno State capital Maiduguri and surrounding areas. Finding solutions to overcrowded camps is a priority. Living in such conditions heightens the risks for fire incidents, abuse and disease outbreaks, including COVID-19. Photo: OCHA/Eve Sabbagh

Situation Overview

Some of the most brutal and direct attacks targeting civilian populations were recorded in November and December, including against internally displaced persons (IDPs) and aid workers or humanitarian assets. On 8 December, a major health facility in Geidam LGA of Yobe State was looted by NSAG operatives who burned the only ambulance servicing the community of over 30,000 people. Several community schools were set on fire in similar attacks in Hawul and Gombi LGAs of Borno and Adamawa states on Christmas Eve. Over 100 civilians were killed over these two months and dozens more feared abducted, including an aid worker who is still missing. The end of the rainy season enabled government forces to intensify operations leading to increased clashes with non-state armed groups (NSAGs) who also ramped up attacks towards the end of the year, with civilians bearing the brunt. NSAG attacks on farming communities increased towards the end of 2020, sparking global outrage after tens of farmers were killed while harvesting their rice farms in Koshobe community, some 15 km outside Maiduguri in late November. On 1 December, the Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator, Mr Edward Kallon, visited the affected communities to commiserate with the victims’ families. He urged Nigerian authorities and all parties to the conflict to ensure the protection of civilians and greater respect of international and human rights laws. These frequent attacks against farmers and fishermen come at a time when food insecurity is rapidly deteriorating across the BAY states. The November Cadre Harmonisé (CH) analysis now projects that up to 5.1 million people risk being critically food insecure during the next lean season (June to August 2021). Food insecurity at such large scale had not been recorded since 2016-2017 when some worst-affected locations faced famine-like conditions. As part of efforts to avert a major food crisis, the UN Emergency Relief Coordinator (ERC) Mark Lowcock in mid-November approved $15 million for urgent food aid in the BAY states. With the end of the rainy season and relative improvement of road conditions, partners scaled up deliveries of food, NFIs and other critical supplies to deep field locations ending weeks of severe shortages for over 300,000 IDPs and host populations in Damboa, Gwoza and Bama LGAs. New waves of NSAG attacks and clashes with government forces along key supply routes however aggravated access challenges in northern Borno. Several aid trucks were unable to reach civilian locations, particularly in Mobbar, Ngala and Monguno LGAs. Deadly armed clashes in Damasak town, Mobbar LGA near the border with Niger, forced a 10-day suspension of UNHAS helicopter flights while several aid trucks were delayed, resulting in weeks of shortages for over 78,000 IDPs, refugee returnees and host community populations in the area. Partners managed to resume truck deliveries to Damasak in late December, through the OCHA-led civil-military coordination (CMCOORD) mechanisms and the scale up of cash and voucher (CVA) programming is being explored as viable alternative. Borno State government is planning to facilitate the return of up to 10,000 Nigerian refugees from Minawao region of Cameroon to Banki town, Bama LGA in early 2021. Although the state government has commenced rehabilitation of damaged homes and facilities in return areas, many of the returnees will likely settle in already crowded camps to gain access to assistance and critical services. Aid organisations commenced repair works on over 500 shelters damaged by unknown persons in the Banki camp extension areas where some of the returnees may be hosted. Partners are working with government actors including the State Emergency Management Agency (SEMA) and security agencies to pre-position relief materials and also provide protection for returnees. On a mission to Nigeria in November, UN Deputy Secretary-General (DSG) Amina Mohammed visited Banki town and emphasized the need to scale up humanitarian assistance and protection of civilians, particularly women and children. She saluted increased collaborations among stakeholders in finding solutions to the crisis that will enable displaced populations to return home and restart their lives in safety. Borno Government facilitated the transfer of some 3,400 IDPs to Marte LGA, on the shores of the Lake Chad in late November, continuing unilateral relocation of civilians to hard-to-reach and inaccessible areas which started in August 2020. Marte is among the worst-affected areas of Borno State and is not accessible to aid workers since 2014. The humanitarian community continues to advocate for principled and multi-stakeholder approach to civilian relocations across the region. Following the onset of the harmattan season and increased risks of fire outbreaks, partners intensified awareness and risk mitigation campaigns across vulnerable camps and host communities in the BAY states. The influx of new arrivals across camps has triggered the construction of makeshift shelters, mostly made from raffia and bamboos that become dry and highly flammable during the harmattan season. At least five fire incidents have been reported across camps in Monguno LGA in recent weeks directly affecting over 800 people. The Inter-Sector Working Group (ISWG) is also developing a camp decongestion strategy that will address risks of outbreaks across camps and communities in the BAY states. Health partners rolled out the final phase of the Seasonal Malaria Chemoprevention (SMC) campaign for the year, targeting over 60,000 children in Bama and Banki towns, while suspected cases of Yellow Fever reported in Gwoza LGA are being investigated and surveillance mechanisms fully activated including in neighbouring locations. A major Yellow Fever vaccination campaign targeting vulnerable locations is planned for January 2021. Like the rest of the country, the BAY states witnessed an upsurge in COVID-19 infections, recording some 290 new cases in November and December. Partners are intensifying response activities including risk awareness and mitigation messaging in local languages and via media, active case search and community mobilization, and support to isolation facilities across BAY states. Funding will be crucial to enable partners to scale up support to BAY states which are already struggling with paucity of resources and weak health systems. Despite access challenges, funding shortfall and unprecedented challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic which forced up the number of people in need to 10.6 million from 7.9 million in January, the humanitarian community reached about 5 million people with multi-sectoral response across the BAY states this year. As of 31 December, only 51% of the $1.08 billion required for the humanitarian response had been received, reinforcing a declining trend in funding since 2017.

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Situation Report
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Nigeria: BAY States Humanitarian Snapshot (as of 31 January 2021)

Nigeria: BAY States Humanitarian Snapshot (as of 31 January 2021)

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Sector Status

Food Security

3.3M
People targeted for food assistance
$315.1M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

Following the conclusion of the October 2020 Cadre Harmonisé (CH) Analysis, the projected number of people in need for the 2021 lean season (June to August) has significantly increased to about 5.1 million people in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe States. Compared to the same period in 2020 (with COVID-19) and 2019, this represents a 19% and 34% increase, respectively. The key drivers for increased needs include insecurity (conflict and banditry), impact of the COVID -19 pandemic and a high food inflation rate. There are also challenges with physical and economic access to food due to reduced market functionality, limited income generating activities, constrained access to production (agricultural land and inputs), limited stock availability at household level and inadequate WASH services.

According to the WFP December 2020 Market Monitoring, the flow of food into markets, following harvest, has contributed to stability in the prices of a few food items (maize and local rice). However, overall prices of key staples remained generally above their values as of December 2019, mainly due to the impact of high transport costs, flooding and the significant weakness of the Naira. Therefore, the early September 2020 advocacy by the Food Security sector for an increase in transfer values still holds.

Response

In December, about 4.2 million people received food security assistance. Of these, 49 per cent received emergency food assistance and the remainder received agricultural livelihoods assistance. This includes the ongoing COVID-19 response program to provide assistance to the increased people in need due to the pandemic and its related effects, as well as the assistance air-lifted by the government to Rann. In order to address pressing energy needs and to reduce the exposure of vulnerable households to insurgents’ attack and health risks, 55 beneficiary households in Bama LGA were supported with solar home systems. A total of 24,830 potential beneficiaries were recorded for the 2020-2021 dry season farming support across BAY states. Partners handed over “goat kits” (3 male and 1 female goats) to 3,100 beneficiary households, “cash plus goat kits” to 750 households, and “noiler chicks kits” to 1,150 households in the BAY states. In order to increase access to energy for cooking, 2,000 Naira per household for cooking fuel will be added to the monthly transfer value for food assistance for partners implementing through Cash and Voucher Assistance modality. For partners implementing in-kind assistance, no solution has been found yet.

Gaps

There has been delayed food dispatches to some deep-field locations due to insecurity and poor road conditions during the rainy season. This has resulted in partners not being able to deliver assistance to Rann and Damasak in December.

Communal asset creation activities have been limited by COVID-19 restrictions.

The Food Security sector (FSS) and WASH/CCCM/Protection partners will continue to ensure complementary delivery of hygiene services and messaging at FSS activities, especially distributions.

As part of the FSS Agricultural Livelihoods Taskforce, the Sector is to start data collection for dry season farming.

Partners are highly encouraged to use the most Updated Food Basket Transfer value calculators. Please contact the sector for details.

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Sector Status

Shelter and Non-Food Items

$76.3M
Funding required (USD)
1.0M
People targeted for Shelter/NFI support

Needs

In December 2020, 123,704 Households (HH) were in need of Shelter and Non-food items (NFIs) assistance across north-eastern Nigeria, especially Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states. Almost 75,104 HH remained in substandard shelter, including unfinished and abandoned buildings and makeshift, partially damaged or shared shelters and overcrowded camps. Shelter solutions, including reinforcement and rehabilitation, are expensive and therefore remain a challenge for most IDPs, vulnerable host communities and returnees. This continues to raise shelter and NFI needs across various locations.

Response

Collectively, the sector and its partners continue to provide lifesaving and life-sustaining assistance in a flexible and targeted approach while adhering to appropriate standards of humanitarian support. In December 2020, people from 17,292 HH were reached with Shelter and NFI assistance.

Shelter partners have continued to provide need-based shelter assistance ranging from provision of emergency shelter to durable shelter support. Emergency shelter support, as part of the sector’s lifesaving shelter assistance, consists of emergency shelter kit distribution, repair/upgrading of emergency shelter in camps and rehabilitation of partially damaged shelter in camps and host communities. 7,555 HH were reached through shelter kit distribution. Emergency shelter kits commonly consist of light closure materials that are designed to provide temporary and immediate shelter solutions.

Additionally, 632 HH were provided with emergency shelter construction (Bama type). Sector partners continue to support the rehabilitation of partially damaged shelters for vulnerable returnees to ensure a protective environment. 2,481 HH benefitted from rehabilitation of this shelter solution.

Some 3,932 HH were assisted with NFI kits, which are necessary for daily use in their shelters across Borno and Adamawa states and contributed to improving the dignity of affected people.

A technical field visit was successfully conducted in December to explore transforming emergency shelter solutions into transitional shelters for vulnerable displaced populations based on a holistic interpretation of the need for shelter. A prototype was implemented by one of the Shelter sector partners.

Gaps

While efforts were made to address the pressing shelter and NFI needs of the most vulnerable populations across the BAY states, challenges and gaps remain to be addressed. Access and safety are the key challenges in north-eastern Nigeria, as well as partners’ capacity and funding constraints. Shelter and NFI needs are enormous and the sector partners do not collectively have the capacity to meet them all.

The Shelter and NFI sector is committed to continue improving its humanitarian action to better meet the challenges described above. This is in line with the sector strategy and working closely with Shelter and NFI partners, Government, and other humanitarian sectors to ensure that vulnerable displaced persons receive physical protection and dignity through provision of shelter, NFI and other basic humanitarian assistance.

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Shelter and Non-Food Items

Shelter and Non-Food Items

Pilot transformation from emergency to transitional shelter solution at Teachers Village camp.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Camp Coordination and Camp Management

1.2M
People targeted for CCCM support
$26.5M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

In December, population movements across the LGAs continued to pose major challenges to the humanitarian response. The Emergency Tracking Tool (ETT) reported a total of 5,718 individuals (IND) arrived and 1,531 IND departed across the BAY states, with Gwoza LGA of Borno State recording the highest influx for the month (943 IND). Gombi LGA of Borno State had the highest departures (532 IND). The major causes of movement are voluntary relocation and poor living condition across BAY states. There were also a series of security challenges in December, triggering pockets of increased displacement into Askira/Uba, Gombi and Gwoza LGAs. However, the Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) sector and its partners have continued to ensure a close follow up on the ongoing emergency with advocacy and interventions to bridge the gap of needs of the displaced population. Two fires broke out in December with limited destruction to approximately seven households (HH) across two camps in Dikwa (one HH) and MMC (six HH). The CCCM sector has made efforts for partners to put more emphasis on sensitization and campaign awareness on fire outbreaks in line with the reviewed fire sensitization guidelines. Limitations to funding have hindered bridging the gap of construction of additional fire stations on site by the CCCM partners.

Response

CCCM operations on site have continued to boost the living condition of the displaced populations through proper site facilitation, campaign awareness, focus group discussions (FGDs), complaints and feedback mechanisms (CFM), camp level coordination meetings (once every month per camp with ad-hoc meetings as needed) and hygiene promotion while abiding/adhering to the COVID-19 prevention protocols.

In the effort to curb fire outbreaks, CCCM partners have engaged in series of site improvement activities in camps and camp-likes settings benefitting from CCCM interventions across BAY states. This has included clearing of drainages, environmental waste management, rehabilitation of fire stations and rapid assessment of camp facilities and structures to ascertain the gaps and further advocate for repairs and interventions.. In December CCCM partners encouraged the communities’ engagement in camp management activities, such as general sanitation, construction and reviving of on-site fire stations, sensitization on the proper use and maintenance of camp facilities/equipment. Emphasis on the need to avoid open defecation as well sensitization and campaign awareness on the adverse effect of such practice was discussedwith the community at large. Measures to ensure success in these exercises include bi-weekly meetings with the on-site committees, sensitizations, campaign awareness and FGDs with the local leaders and religious leaders of the camps.

CCCM partners also put emphasis on referrals/feedback of on-site complaints, tracking and resolving 70-80% of complaints received and escalating to the appropriate sectors the 20-30% of the complaints that remained open.

Gaps

The CCCM sector will continue to advocate for interventions to address the trend of movement/displacement resulting from security incidents. CCCM will continue to boost operations in camps and camp-like settings through community engagement, FGDs, capacity building, sanitation, committee trainings, camp-level coordination meetings, advocacy and campaign awareness against poor hygiene, fire outbreaks etc. With congestion continuing to pose significant challenges in all aspects of standardizing camp management in the north-east, the priority will continue to be decongestion of highly congested camps/reception centres in the BAY states. It will also be a priority to maintain the rigorous community mobilization and sensitization of the decongestion process to gauge perceptions, understand fears and expectations and build a sense of ownership among the communities.

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Sector Status

Early Recovery

1.6M
People targeted for early recovery
$112.7M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

The livelihoods situation in northeast Nigeria remains precarious. Although many COVID-19 restrictions have been lifted, there have been additional challenges caused by attacks carried out by non-state armed groups (NSAGs).Most livelihood activities across the states showed deterioration over the course of December, with several zones/LGAs in emergency situations due to the global pandemic, insecurity and rise in cost of production inputs.

The critical challenges affected people face include a lack of livelihood opportunities, food insecurity, and inflated prices. These factors have increased tension across IDP camps and host communities, forcing affected and vulnerable populations to adopt negative coping mechanisms, including transactional sex and street begging.

Reduction of basic services and livelihoods are exacerbating the vulnerabilities of affected people, as shown with increased unemployment and loss of remittances. Food security and livelihoods are particularly weakened due to semi-subsistence lifestyles and heavy dependence on the informal sector for income.

Response

Between November and December 2020, over 3,000 beneficiaries have been employed in cash-for-work activities for public assets rehabilitation in 26 communities across Monguno, Mobbar and Nganzai LGAs.

Some 51 basic infrastructures have been rehabilitated and constructed across the BAY states; including 28 grain storages, seven blocks of public latrines (in markets and slaughterhouses), one market shed, 15 health infrastructures (the latter giving healthcare access to over 10,000 individuals).

In Borno State, approximately 2,270 people have received vocational skills training on installation, knitting, catering, barbing, plumbing and pipe fitting, welding, hair salon, briquetting, shoe and bag making, artwork, cosmetology, vegetable farming, tie & die and computer repairs. They all received their start-up kits to start their businesses. Monguno, Kukawa and Nangere LGAs have been supported with local governance restoration activities.

Village Savings and Loan Association (VSLA) groups in three wards of Nangere LGA continue their routine saving and loans meetings. In the review period, the total sum of NGN376,000 was distributed as loans to 23 VSLA beneficiaries.

Gaps

Major gaps include limited access and delay of activities due to attacks on farmers by non-state armed groups. Access remains difficult for humanitarian agencies to reach the most vulnerable and affected populations. Progress is being made in close collaboration with all agencies and governments to ensure that vulnerable individuals are benefitting from all basic amenities.

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Sector Status

Emergency Telecommunications

$3.0M
Funding required for ETS services (USD)
100
Organizations targeted

Needs

Throughout December, COVID-19-related restrictions on the movement of humanitarians have required staff from the Emergency Telecommunications sector (ETS) to work from home in order to curb the spread of the virus in north-east Nigeria. While most ETS staff worked remotely, three staff worked in the office at the Red Roof humanitarian hub in Maiduguri on a needs-based schedule.

Response

The ETS team continues to provide vital communications services to the humanitarian community across north-east Nigeria, including internet connectivity in eight humanitarian hubs and security communications in 10 operational areas. Throughout 2020, the ETS provided internet connectivity services to more than 4,559 users from 115 organizations (15 United Nations agencies and 100 NGOs.

In December, the ETS programmed seven radios to enable humanitarians to improve communication between staff and to ensure their safety and security in the region. The ETS helpdesk received and resolved 67 information and communications technology (ICT)-related issues reported by its users through email and phone. The team also conducted remote capacity building activities by delivering a training session on basic security telecommunications for eight participants from Christian Aid INGO in Monguno. The ETS team embarked on missions to deep field locations – Damasak and Ngala – to resolve technical issues that require the physical presence of ETS technicians. The ETS also commenced the installation of the solar-powered hybrid system to support its connectivity equipment. The contractors have completed the installation in three out of eight sites: Dikwa, Ngala and Gwoza. Installation activities at the other ETS sites will continue in January 2021.

The ETS also concluded an analysis of the annual ETS user satisfaction survey and shared the report with humanitarians in north-east Nigeria and with ETS partners. The 2020 ETS user satisfaction survey report showed an overall user satisfaction rate of 96% for the core ETS services provided in the country, including internet connectivity, security telecommunications, telephone and customer support.

Gaps

Due to the COVID-19-related restrictions, the ETS has had to postpone several of its planned activities. However, as travel restrictions have eased, the team commenced the installation the hybrid solar power system in field locations in December.

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Sector Status

Logistics

$30.3M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

There is a continued need for the storage of essential humanitarian items, both food and non-food items, in deep field locations. While the storage need has remained fairly constant over the year, routine maintenance of assets is hampered by the ongoing travel limitations due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The lack of reliable warehouses in Borno State has increased the needs of temporary storage units and the Logistics sector continues to loan Mobile Storage Units (MSUs) to humanitarian partners in Maiduguri and field locations.

Timely approval of Humanitarian Cargo Movement Notification Forms (HCMNFs) from the Nigerian Armed Forces (NAF) on a weekly basis is essential in order to ensure the movement of humanitarian supplies in field locations. Cargo movements approval for the first week of December were delayed by the Theatre Command resulting in disruption of planned delivery.

Response

In December, the Logistics sector processed 734 HCMNFs from 30 organizations for 44 destinations (accounting for the movement of 1,700 vehicles). Sector-managed storage facilities, operated by NGO service providers in six locations across Borno State, received 3,569612m³ (973.98 mT) of humanitarian cargo for 13 organizations. A total of 13.692 m3 (7.323 mT) of cargo was consolidated at Maiduguri warehouse to be airlifted by UNHAS.

The Logistics sector supported 28 organizations through common services (storage, cargo movements, air cargo consolidation), coordination and information management support.

Volatile security conditions in north-east Nigeria require continued liaison and coordination with the relevant stakeholders, including state and non-state actors. This includes, but is not limited to, the Civil-Military Coordination (CMCoord) Forum, Access Working Group, Nigeria NGO forum and Nigerian Armed Forces (NAF).

Gaps

In light of increased security incidents on many roads in Borno State, the transportation of humanitarian cargo to field locations became increasingly challenging. This increased risk resulted in some humanitarian organizations finding it difficult to secure transport from their vendors at the agreed rates. As a result of the increased risk, some humanitarian organizations opted for the option of travelling with armed escorts provided by the Nigerian Armed Forces, which poses several challenges. Similarly, the movement of personnel to field locations for routine supervision and maintenance has been a major challenge due to restrictions in place to prevent the spread of COVID 19.

The Logistics sector plans to increase advocacy using the existing coordination forums to request the NAF to improve security along the main supply routes and explore alternatives based on humanitarian partners’ requests to ensure the safe delivery of aid to people in need.

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Sector Status

WASH

$104.1M
Funding required (USD)
2.5M
People targeted for WASH assistance

Needs

Vulnerable populations continue to face enormous needs for WASH services and WASH non-food items (NFIs). Lack of space has affected access to sanitation in some camps, with WASH agencies opting for manual dislodging of latrines to ensure access. In other scenarios, the last resort to build latrines outside the camp perimeter has affected access to dignified sanitation. Some of the sites have no possibility of expansion, however, and WASH agencies are looking at scaling up manual dislodging and rehabilitation of old latrines as a last resort.

Some areas experienced delays in distribution of NFIs due to inaccessibility. WASH partners have been challenged in some distribution locations by disruptions or looting of WASH NFIs. The sector has mapped three distributions. Most of the identified challenges include significant needs from vulnerable IDPs and host communities, which trigger desperate attempts to bypass the screening and registration processes to get access to NFIs.

Solid waste in MMC and other locations including hosted communities remains a critical gap, UNICEF and other agencies have initiated discussions with BOSEPA to find sustainable solutions for managing solid waste, which is a key environmental concern.

Access to water has greatly improved through scaling up motorization of water points, rehabilitating existing water stations and involving community members in managing their water sources.

Response

In December 2020, WASH agencies provided clean water, access to dignified sanitation and essential WASH non-food items (NFIs) through the WASH sector common pipeline. Overall, operation and maintenance ensured continued access to 399K people. while 30 new and 234 rehabilitated handpumps and 54 new solar and motorized boreholes including 86 repairs on water systems benefitted 339k individuals. A total of 5,977 latrines were newly constructed and an additional 3,986 were rehabilitated. A total of 26K individuals were reached with these latrines, while 822 households benefited from household-level latrines. Emergency desludging reached a total of 71k individuals. Hygiene promotion targeting 499k individuals was conducted, out of this 140K were sensitized on COVID-19 prevention messaging.

Through the WASH sector core pipeline supported by UNICEF and IOM, a total of 147,000 individuals were reached with COVID-19 prevention kits and WASH NFIs. Similarly, 25,648 bars of soaps were released as part of the COVID-19 response.

The WASH sector has merged COVID-19 awareness campaigns with the regular hygiene promotion awareness messaging, with further discussions on how to ensure the involvement of water, sanitation and other committees to support awareness for children, women and men. Joint campaigns for hygiene promotion were held across various LGAs, emphasizing camp clean up and soap distribution. The WASH sector also celebrated World Toilet day under the theme ‘Sustainable Sanitation and Climate Change’.

The WASH sector has embarked on the development of a three-year strategy which will provide guidance and direction in WASH programming, improve service delivery and response and include all the other roadmaps and legal frameworks to ensure the critical gaps are met through state and agency collaborations and the whole WASH sector at state and LGA levels.

Gaps

The main challenges faced by WASH partners continue to be access, transportation and delivery of WASH NFIs on time. Sector partners have faced challenges where various distributions were disrupted by unknown persons armed with crude weapons, scaring agency staff and looting supplies.

In Pulka, the WASH sector approved the release of materials which had caused a long standoff with host communities, paving way for new supplies and replenishment of the core pipeline. Additional measures have been put in place including targeting vulnerable hosts, however, the need surpasses the capacity. More efforts are being put on screening, community feedback and accountability to affected people (AAP) to ensure that this does not continue in 2021.

More advocacy and support is required to support environmental sanitation. Camps in MMC face huge challenges in disposing of solid waste and large damp sites have since formed in most of the camps. The sector is looking at various options to resolve solid waste issues, however, it remains critically underfunded.

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WASH

WASH

Wind Turbine installed in Dikwa Camp.

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Sector Status

Child Protection Sub-Sector

1.8M
People targeted for child protection
$27.3M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

In November 2020, the 5W report indicated that only 37% per cent of children and their caregivers were reached with child protection services, despite an increase in needs across the BAY states. An analysis by Child Protection (CP) services indicates severe needs in mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) as 36% and community-based reintegration services and 34%. Children still face critical protection risks. The 5W report reveal 63% of total targets for 2020 are yet to be reached with core CP services, especially unaccompanied and separated children who continued to be challenged by protection risks such as sexual violence, physical safety in the communities, fear of disease (like COVID-19), kidnapping and forced marriage.

Response

To aid strategic planning for 2021, the Child Protection sub-sector (CPSS) Humanitarian Response Plan, which details the target population and objectives for the 2021 Humanitarian Program Cycle, was developed and shared with partners to serve as a guide for aligning their projects against the sub-sector’s priorities. Projects from 20 partners (12 national NGOs, 6 international NGOs and 2 UN agencies) were approved on the project module with financial requirements of USD 20M for 2021. A virtual orientation session was carried out by the CPSS to support service mapping and development of referral pathways in Yobe State. The service mapping and referral pathways for Yobe State and Mubi Axis in Adamawa state were updated through LGA-level child protection coordination mechanisms. To provide strategic direction and guidance to the work of the CPSS and facilitate timely and effective decision-making, national and international NGO representatives elected and endorsed the new composition of the CPSS Strategic Advisory Group (SAG). The newly elected representatives from two national NGOs (Herwa and ROHI) and international NGOs (IRC and Search for Common Ground) join the 2021 SAG for an annual tenure.

Gaps

As of December 2020, 40 per cent of children and caregivers out of the total targeted population were reached with child protection services. Only 38% of the targeted children had been reached with family tracing and reunification services and only 43% of the targeted children and vulnerable caregivers had been reached with psychosocial support services. In total, only 431,878 people out of the targeted 1,072,274 children and vulnerable caregivers had been reached with child protection services in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states, representing only 40% of the total target. The CPSS has continue to disseminate gaps and needs identified by the LGA level coordination with partners to take up and provide child protection services.

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Sector Status

Education

$54.5M
Funding required (USD)
3.1M
People targeted for education sector

Needs

The Education sector observed in November and December 2020 that with the second wave of COVID-19 infections some states had already begun to close schools. More reports of COVID-19 positive cases were also \reported in the north-east. During this period, the sector also saw a delay in implementation of various projects, with the COVID-19 pandemic as the main reason for this delay. This has left a serious impact on the education response in different schools and camps. Sustaining and scaling up the remote education response in the north-east and developing or reinforcing a revised response strategy to address the second wave will be essential.

The Education sector noticed a need to conduct separate Education in Emergencies working group (EiEWG) meetings for Yobe and Adamawa states to ensure their specific operational issues are addressed. This was also discussed with the Ministry of Education and State Universal Basic Education Boards (SUBEBs) in each state.

Response

For the 2021 Humanitarian Needs Overview (HNO) and Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP), the Education sector finalized the People in Need (PiN) calculation, targets and funding estimates. The sector also provided support to partners to upload their 2021 project proposals on the project module. All the proposals uploaded on the project module were analysed, approved or rejected based on the sector strategy and priorities. The sector led the first separate EiEWG meetings for Adamawa and Yobe States in November and December to ensure coordination at state level. A last meeting was also conducted for the north-east on a specific agenda relating to the Cluster Coordination Performance Monitoring, the annual work plan, and co-leadership of the sector. In terms of IM products, the January-October 2020 HRP Dashboard was finalized. On the donor side, the Nigeria Multi Year Resilience Program (MYRP) was approved by the Education Cannot Wait (ECW) Executive Committee for a budget of $USD 20.1 M over three years. Three grantees were selected: UNICEF for $6M, Save the Children for $7.5M and a consortium of NRC & Street Child for $7.5M. The sector is working with all grantees to ensure the entire coverage of the BAY states, coordination among them and the complementarity of this fund with other existing funds in EiE.

Gaps

The sector continues to advocate for funds for an increased response to the second wave of the COVID-19, especially as, the Ministry of Education is considering closing schools again. A response based on the lessons learnt during the first wave of infections needs to be developed. Bilateral meetings were conducted with key partners to address gaps and delay in the response. A specific meeting was conducted with UNICEF on the implementation plan for CERF and GPE Accelerated Fund allocations. UNICEF promised to finalize the process in January with selection of implementing partners. All Education Cannot Wait (ECW) grantees (Save the Children, UNICEF, NRC/Street Child) committed in an ad-hoc meeting to share the implementing partner selection plan by January and to be ready to start the project by 1 February 2021. The sector committed to discuss with ECW to get the approval and start date on 1 January 2021.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Mine Action Sub-Sector

0.6M
People targeted for mine action sub-sector
$7.9M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

Borno State government plans to relocate or resettle internally displaced persons (IDPs) within their LGA of origin increase the need for humanitarian mine action activities, such as surveying land prior to return and explosive ordnance risk education. Relocation and resettlement plans also require efforts to train Nigerian institutions in the management of mine action in areas yet inaccessible to humanitarians.

However, despite increasing needs, measures taken to mitigate the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and reduce risks for vulnerable populations mean a decreased number of people now benefit from risk education sessions to ensure physical distancing. Mine Action activities are also lower priority for the reduced UN Humanitarian Air Service to deep field locations.

In October 2020, 34 incidents with explosive hazards were recorded, and four people were injured and 3 were killed predominantly by landmines of an improvised nature. Nine of the accidents could have been prevented.

In November 2020, 41 incidents with explosive hazards were recorded, and 36 people were injured and killed predominantly by landmines of an improvised nature. Five of these accidents, such as civilians picking up explosive remnants of war, could have been prevented.

Response

In October, the Mine Action sub-sector (MASS) reached a total of 14,636 people through explosive ordnance risk education (EORE): 3,131 girls, 3,235 boys, 4,321 women, and 3,949 men. A total of 14 non-technical surveys (NTS) took place in Gwoza, Konduga, Dikwa, Mubi South and Madagali LGAs.

In November, a total of 11,257 people were reached through EORE: 2,825 girls, 2,926 boys, 3,393 women, and 2,113 men. A total of 7 NTS took place in Gwoza, Dikwa, Jere, Madagali, Mubi South, Michika LGAs.

Emergency First Responder training was conducted for 92 National Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC) personnel, including 22 women. Advanced Emergency First Responder training was conducted for 16 people, including 8 women, in order to increase capacity to save lives and reduce the impact of explosive incidents. In November, MASS conducted EORE training of trainers for 32 staff from the National Emergency Management Agency and Borno State Emergency Management Agency, including 4 women. In addition, a Victim Assistance Specialist mapped needs and services for victims and survivors of explosive incidents.

In October, Nigeria requested an extension of the Article 5 of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention deadline and presented the request at the 18th Meeting of State Parties in November, with support from the MASS.

Gaps

The main challenges the sub-sector faces include an increase in needs and insufficient capacity, including funding, to address these, as well as limited possibility to interact with beneficiaries due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Funding remains a challenge since most operations are delivered through Community Liaison Teams. It is essential for the Mine Action partners to scale up capacity to survey lands prior to returns as well as to raise awareness to IDPs who are resettled.

The Mine Action sub-sector has addressed some of these challenges by recruiting a Medic who trained NSCDC personnel on emergency medical response to increase capacity to save lives and reduce the impact of explosive incidents on civilians, such as attacks involving ammunition or gunfire or road traffic accidents. In addition, a Victim Assistance Specialist was hired to map needs and services for victims and survivors of explosive incidents.

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Situation Report
Media
Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator standing before mass grave
Zabarmari, Borno State, 1 December 2020 - Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator, Mr Edward Kallon, standing before a mass grave where several farmers were buried on 29 November. Tens of farmers were killed in a violent non-state armed group attack on 28 November 2020. The attack is the deadliest in 2020, but only one of many recurring attacks against farmers, fishermen, and other civilians in conflict-affected Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states. Photo: OCHA/Eve Sabbagh

Humanitarian Coordinator Statement Following Condolences Visit to Zabarmari, Borno - 2 December 2020

There is no word to describe how I feel after my visit to Zabarmari communities yesterday. It is with great sadness, but also indignation, that I met the families of the victims of Saturday’s violent attack and their communities to extend my most sincere condolences, on behalf of the United Nations and humanitarian partners, and to commiserate with them on these atrocious circumstances.

Farmers and villagers I have met have retold accounts of unspeakable cruelty. Innocent civilians - men and women - were ruthlessly killed. Details on losses are still coming in and the search for missing people is still ongoing. More bodies are being recovered. Farmers have also reported some of the missing women may have been abducted. I call for these innocent women and girls to be immediately released and for their safe return to their communities.

With more slain civilians recovered almost every day since the attack, it is clear that this was an act of sheer inhumanity and abject cruelty. The perpetrators of this heinous and senseless act should be brought to justice.

I met with His Excellency Prof Babagana Umara Zulum, Governor of Borno State, as well as their Excellencies the Governors of Adamawa, Bauchi, Gombe, Taraba states and the Deputy Governor of Yobe State. We all agree that stabilizing and developing the north-east is not only important for the people living in these states but also crucial for the whole country and key to the sub-region. Full press statement here.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Nutrition

0.8M
People targeted for nutrition assistance
$103.5M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

The nutrition situation in the BAY states significantly deteriorated in September with increased rates of acute malnutrition attributed to the reduced access to food during the ongoing lean season (increased food prices, low harvest) and disease outbreak. Continued insecurity also generated disruption of health and nutrition services and new population displacements.

The number of severely acutely malnourished children admitted into the nutrition treatment programme continues to be high compared to September 2019. The number of children with severe acute malnutrition admitted into the treatment programs increased by 30% in September compared to August, clearly indicating a seasonal period of high prevalence of malnutrition lasting longer than in previous years.

To address the continued increase in acute malnutrition rates, the Nutrition sector requires additional resources including Ready-to-use Therapeutic Food (RUTF), supplementary foods to expand MAM treatment, and funding to expand the stabilization centres capacities. The sector also requires MUAC tapes to scale-up the family/mother MUAC approach to ensure households are empowered to monitor the nutritional status of their children. The sector will also require resources to strengthen the existing surveillance system and monitor the nutrition situation.

In particular, the sector requires additional resources to establish temporary stabilizations centres and mobile outpatient therapeutic programmes in areas affected by insecurity, including Magumeri, Gubio and Mobbar LGAs.

Response

In September 2020, Nutrition sector partners admitted 28,723 severely malnourished children into the treatment programs. The total number of severely malnourished children admitted up to September 2020 is approximately 70% of the annual target. Over 90 per cent of all children in the outpatient therapeutic programmes and stabilisation centers (SCs) were successful treated and discharged as cured. However, approximately 4% of the children admitted in the SCs died. The major cause of mortality is attributed to caregivers seeking health and nutrition treatment only when their children are presenting advanced poor nutritional status and medical complications. The delay in seeking treatment is often due to use of traditional herbal concoctions and the lack of nutrition services in areas affected by insecurity. Three children have died every day in the BAY states on average since the beginning of the year.

To prevent and treat moderate acute malnutrition (MAM), Sector partners reached approximately 105,000 children between six and 23 months and 55,000 pregnant and breastfeeding women from food insecure households through the blanket supplementary feeding programme (BSFP). In addition, an average of 4,631 children between 24 and 59 months with MAM were also included in the BSFP.

In September, partners reached a monthly average of 8,000 children ages six to 59 months with MAM through the facility-based targeted supplementary feeding programme (TSFP) in selected communities in Jere and Kaga LGAs in Borno State and 10 LGAs in Yobe State. The number of MAM admitted into the TSFP increased by 40% compared to previous months clearly indicating deterioration of the nutritional status of the children in the targeted areas.

To prevent micronutrient deficiencies among children from six to 23 months, Sector partners reached 42,106 children with micronutrient supplementation powders (MNP).

To promote the prevention of acute malnutrition, Nutrition Sector partners provided infant and young child feeding (IYCF) counselling to 77,029 caregivers and 18,799 pregnant women at health facilities. The number of caregivers and pregnant women reached increased compared to the past few months as community members have resumed utilising health and nutrition services that were disrupted by COVID-19 pandemic.

Gaps

The main challenge facing the Nutrition sector is the lack of capacity to effectively respond to sudden onset emergencies due to escalating insecurity. Insecurity has resulted in disruptions of nutrition services in places including Gubio, Magumeri, Mafa, and Mobbar LGAs in Borno State and in Geidam and Gujba LGAs in Yobe State.

The prolonged lean season had added pressure on the low stabilization centres capacities to cope with the increased rates of SAM cases with medical complications who require intensive medical care and increased mortality rate. The Sector requires additional resources to increase the coverage of SCs in Yobe and Adamawa states and to establish temporary SCs in partially accessible areas like Magumeri and Gubio LGAs.

There is a growing number of under-nourished and separated infants as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, increased population displacement and armed conflict. Prevention and management of wasting among infants, particularly for the non-breastfed, is a highly technical and resource-demanding initiative which the north-east is lacking at the moment.

The Sector is currently developing the guidance, but significant resources are required to scale-up the identification and treatment of children under 6 months.

The increased malnutrition rates require the Sector to increase its surveillance and early warning mechanism capacity to ensure that the nutritional situation is closely monitored, and effective response put in place to prevent further deterioration.

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Nigeria

Situation Report

Sector Status

Protection (General)

$25.1M
Funding required (USD)
2.5M
People targeted for protection assistance

Needs

The security situation across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe (BAY) states continues to remain volatile. In September there were multiple attempts by non-state armed group (NSAG) operatives to infiltrate IDP camps, such as in Banki, in Bama LGA, and in Jere LGA, in Borno State.

There were at least 22 abduction in September, mostly targeting IDPs cultivating crops in their farmlands or fetching firewood for subsistence across locations such as MMC, Damboa, Mobbar (Damasak) and Ngala LGAs in Borno State.

In Adamawa State, organised criminal groups continued to target civilians and humanitarian actors; while in Yobe State, threats of NSAG attacks particularly in  return communities in Gujba LGA remained high throughout September, causing panic among populations. 

Critical challenges for affected people including lack of livelihood opportunities, food insecurity and inflated prices have increased tension across IDP camps and host communities, forcing affected and vulnerable populations to adopt negative coping mechanisms including transactional sex and street begging. The Borno State Government's plan to return IDPs to some LGAs witnessing escalating clashes and attacks raised concerns of safety and continued access of IDPs to critical assistance and services. Many of the areas listed for IDP relocation are still inaccessible to aid agencies due to ongoing insecurity.

Response

In September, the Protection Sector stepped up advocacy with key actors, including state and local authorities, protection partners and other sectors, to ensure that affected people’s protection needs were highlighted and addressed. Protection partners also conducted a joint rapid assessment at Muna El Badawee camp in Jere LGA of Borno, where there was an influx of new arrivals following attacks in neighbouring locations.

Various assessments in September revealed that many IDPs wish to return to their areas of origin, providing certain conditions, particularly adequate security and provision of basic amenities, are met by authorities. The Sector engaged with protection actors to coordinate data collection regarding IDP return intentions and conditions in return areas. The Sector advocated, including with local authorities, donors and the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT), for an inclusive process that involves inputs from IDP communities and protection actors for all relocation activities.

The Sector also facilitated high level meetings to present and articulate the position of the humanitarian community to ensure a principled and sustainable returns process. Discussions on the 2021 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) have been initiated, and the Protection Sector North-East (PSNE) is engaging with relevant partners on finalising indicators and People in Need (PiN) elements. The Sector also partook and contributed to the finalization of indicators for the Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) activities.

Gaps

The deteriorating security situation remains the main cause of displacements. Ongoing unilateral relocation of IDPs by Borno State Government, expected to continue in the coming weeks despite safety and security risks triggered by escalating attacks and clashes, is a major concern for Sector partners. The Sector and its partners are likely to face serious challenges in this regard, especially as some of the relocations are taking place at short notice and to areas which are still inaccessible to humanitarian actors. The Sector will continue to advocate for voluntary, safe, principled and sustainable returns and durable solutions, and coordinate data collection, including by finalising its harmonised protection monitoring tool.

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Situation Report
Visuals and Data
Humanitarian Dashboard (January to June 2020)

North-East Nigeria Humanitarian Dashboard (January to June 2020)

Between January and June, the United Nations and humanitarian partners have reached a total of 2.6 million people with humanitarian assistance (around 34 percent of the people targeted) across 61 Local Government Areas (LGAs) in Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe States of north-east Nigeria. Life-saving emergency interventions remain the immediate priority. Despite significant achievements by the humanitarian community, millions of affected people are still facing hunger; lack protection; have limited or no access to health facilities or to water, sanitation and hygiene; or live in overcrowded camp conditions, with some of them still sleeping in the open. In various areas across the three states, levels of acute malnutrition for children under five are above emergency thresholds. The impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, rising insecurity and funding shortfalls still pose challenges to aid organisations providing urgent assistance to some of the most vulnerable people in north-east Nigeria.

Full dashboard here

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Situation Report
Feature
Falmata
Falmata (right) is relaxed and busy in knitting a traditional cap. Photo: CIDAR

Greater safety for vulnerable women and girls in camps

For women and girls living in IDP camps, the most natural everyday actions can be source of anxiety and danger. Falmata Bukar, 25, tells us how an intervention from Center for Integrated Development and Research (CIDAR) is making her feel more secure and helping her lead a life in dignity.

Falmata fled her home in Mafa Local Government Area of Borno State four years ago. She and her siblings are living alone in the Muna El-Badawi Camp, on the outskirts of Borno State capital Maiduguri. Falmata refuses to be lingering in the camp and sitting idle causes her frustration. She can be seen knitting caps for several hours in front of her shelter. The occupation brings her some revenue to support her family.

She however had, until recently, been living in constant apprehension. She had been concerned about her extreme vulnerability every time she had to go to ease herself. Toilets blocks in the camp were far away from her shelter and in deplorable state as nobody was willing to wash them, and the smell was intolerable. Some organisations used to give detergent, disinfectants and cleaning tools at regular intervals but these were never sufficient to maintain the facilities. Many IDPs preferred open defecation to entering the toilet blocks, and the entire area used to smell. And it was even worse when it was raining.

Falmata and other women and girls in her part of the camp preferred to go to nearby bushes. Fulmata recalls how stressful this was for her as she had to wait for hours and was often going in the dark, at night. She felt unprotected and unsafe. She always tried to accompany someone from the family or asked a friend to escort her. This was nerve-racking and she was extremely uncomfortable.

On 23 May, a fire broke out in the camp and ravaged many shelters in the camp. All her belonging were burned down to ashes. Many aid organisations provided immediate support, With funding from the NHF, CIDAR constructed six blocks of latrines and showers close to where her shelter was rebuilt. “Now, I don’t fear for safety when I need to go to the toilets anymore,” explained Falmata. “I feel safer even when I have to go alone at night. These toilets are protected and covered. Women, girls and children can make use of these sanitation facilities at any time of the day and night.”

Falmata’s family and neighbours receive support from CIDAR to clean, disinfect and conduct general maintenance of these sanitation facilities. Toilet Users’ Groups have been constituted to look after newly constructed sanitation facilities (WASHCOMs) and they conduct the daily cleaning. “Even our younger brothers and sisters now easily go to the toilets. Fear of going to the toilets is now history!” she said, laughing.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Housing, Land and Property Sub-Sector

$0.4M
Funding required (USD)
0.9M
People targeted for HLP assistance

Needs

In August, the Housing Land and Property (HLP) sub-sector received requests to respond to eviction cases involving IDPs living in rented accommodations within host communities, particularly in Borno State. This was attributed to the inability to pay rental charges and the influx of IDPs to host communities and settlements, incurring charges from landowners, as many official camps are already congested and stretched beyond capacity.

Response

To raise awareness on HLP rights, the sub-sector organized trainings and activities in August including a two-day training for 25 IDP women groups from various camps across Borno State, in collaboration with the Borno State Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development. The training aimed to increase women’s understanding of HLP rights and how to exercise these rights.

A three-day training for ACTED Camp Coordination and Camp Management/Shelter staff aimed to strengthen mainstream HLP rights, to ensure the sustainability of interventions with an emphasis on services provided in informal camps.

In Adamawa State, the sub-sector in collaboration with the state branch of the Nigerian Bar Association (NBA) organized a one-day HLP/Access to Justice workshop on resolving HLP disputes for IDPs and returnees and the role of the NBA and legal practitioners in general. Key recommendations include, the need to: intensify advocacy on IDPs and returnees’ rights to HLP restitution; raise awareness on the Kampala Convention; collaborate with the International Federation of Women Lawyers (FIDA) and other CSOs to step up awareness on HLP needs of IDPs and returnees; and for the NBA to engage with Ministry of Justice to develop priorities and guide justice sector reforms related to IDPs.

The sub-sector also held an interactive session with land officers in Adamawa State to address the lack of documentation/record of rights/titles for housing and lands which were not necessarily needed before the crisis, but have now become important evidence of property ownership, particularly for IDPs returning from displacement locations. Norwegian Refugee Council's Information Counselling and Legal Assistance (ICLA) unit provided HLP legal assistance services to 575 IDP returnees on the recovery or replacement of lost documentation in Damboa and Gwoza LGAs of Borno State.

The sub-sector is reviewing eviction guidance tools to effectively mitigate and manage eviction issues. The sub-sector participated in the HLP Evictions & Relocations Interest Group meeting on the 20 August, which explored measures to protect the rights of tenants/occupants and ensure they are clearly informed of their eviction, and are given a “reasonable notice” of departure to enable them to find alternative housing solutions. For ‘informal’ evictions and departures, negotiation for reasonable notice by landlords/landowners – with period of reasonable notice to be determined by the tenant and ideally be around 15 days to one month – was proposed.

In Madinatu camp, Jere LGA of Borno State, some 11 households were evicted from the land they had been occupying for over two years by the land owner on the premise of wanting to put the land to personal use. The HLP sub-sector was able to facilitate access to alternative land for the affected IDPs. Sub-sector partners provided the IDPs with NFIs and building kits for the construction of shelters.

Gaps

The sub-sector continues to identify eviction cases through field visits and referrals from community leaders, sector partners and NNGOs/CBOs for HLP legal assistance due to inability of IDPs to pay rent. Most of the eviction cases are from Borno and Adamawa states, and are largely attributed to the lack of livelihoods to generate income for rent, and the economic hardship exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. With limited donors funding “cash-for-rent” interventions, the existing gaps remain huge, leaving many IDPs at risk of forced evictions.

The sub-sector will continue monitoring informal IDP sites to mitigate and prevent evictions, while also responding to cases of threats of eviction and actual eviction through engagements with traditional/community and government stakeholders.

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Situation Report
Analysis

Yobe State Humanitarian Situation Analysis (April to June 2020)

Conflict continued in Yobe State, including NSAG attacks and clashes with government forces along the LGAs of Geidam and Gujba, bordering Borno State. The security situation in these LGAs remains unpredictable and volatile. Government forces continue to carry out operations and maintain a high level of alertness following NSAG activities across border LGAs.

There is a significant increase in the threats of attacks on both civilian and military convoys, abduction/kidnapping (at illegal vehicle checkpoints), and IEDs along these routes. UXOs also pose a threat, with incidents reported in June in Gujba LGA, with the police issuing warning of widespread threats across the LGAs, particularly across farming areas. NSAG attacks were targeting civilian communities across Bursari, Geidam, Gujba LGAs, and abductions in Lantewa, Tarmuwa LGA along the Damaturu – Babangida road. An attack in Buni Gari (27/04/2020), Gujba LGA, resulted in the burning down of activity centers of some humanitarian actors in the community, which triggered a temporary suspension of operations.

Download the full report here.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Gender-Based Violence Sub-Sector

1.3M
People targeted for GBV assistance
$35.3M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

The COVID-19 pandemic is heightening already existing vulnerabilities for gender-based violence, reducing survivors access to report, seek help or receive quality response services. In some situations, there has been an increase in the incidents of GBV; however, in north-east Nigeria, restrictions and lockdown measures have presented barriers for survivors who are seeking help and service provision.

Organizations providing GBV services have had to adapt and apply flexible approaches, in order to continue providing service for survivors and people in need. The GBV Sub-Sector has engaged in the development of COVID-19 response strategies, collaborating with the COVID-19 Task Force and supporting partners to maintain service provision.

Response

The GBV Sub-Sector (GBVSS) developed technical and strategic guidance notes and strategies, as well as compiled and shared relevant resources for partners to support response actions in the COVID-19 context. The resources are on GBV case management, the GBV information management system (GBVIMS), safe space management, PSEA, and other relevant resources. Staff have received appropriate training on adapting new guidelines and guidance notes to service provision.

The GBVSS facilitated the transition to remote service provision in the context of COVID-19. Partners established confidential spaces including service provision hubs to provide remote services through telephone helplines throughout the COVID-19 pandemic in Maiduguri, Pulka and Monguno (Borno State). This enhanced access to GBV case management and psychosocial support services for survivors and other vulnerable individuals.

Facilities and service delivery points for GBV services, such as women and girl’s friendly spaces, integrated/women empowerment facilities, and one stop centres, have set up hand washing facilities and put hygiene measures in place to ensure staff and beneficiaries adhere to public health standards. Partners also set up designated areas (temporary confinement spaces or rooms) with dignity for beneficiaries showing signs or symptoms of COVID-19 while health teams are contacted. Partners also procured and provided COVID-19 prevention items and supplies to protection desks and women and girls friendly spaces. Moreover, GBV response teams in referral centres are following Infection, Prevention and Control procedures.

The GBVSS conducted mapping of critical GBV response stakeholders and updated GBV referral pathways. To support GBV response teams to respond appropriately, they were provided with personal protection supplies such as face masks, hand sanitizers, gloves, and other protective gear to meet the logistical needs of GBV survivors. GBV/PSEA messages were developed focusing on reporting channels, GBV service availability and referral pathways. The GBVSS also started the process of scaling up the rollout of Primero/GBVIMS+ to document case management practices during lockdowns with limited engagement. Given that remote service provision has risks associated with guaranteeing safety and confidentiality, GBVIMS+/Primero facilitates ethical and confidential incident data management and security.

The GBV Sub-Sector conducted a test run of Smart RR - a mobile application which enables survivors, social workers and service providers to report and refer GBV incidents to relevant service providers and authorities, conducts service mapping, automatically updates the referral directory, and collects and analyses referral data. The application is an innovation of a local NGO partner, built on the referral mechanism of the GBV Sub-Sector to mitigate existing challenges such as under-reporting and difficulties associated with accessing services.

Gaps

The reduced presence of humanitarian personnel, especially in some of the deep field locations, has strained available services and limited access to GBV service provision. Meanwhile, frontline staff and response teams lack access to adequate basic personal supplies to enable them to respond appropriately to the identified needs.

Community-based GBV prevention activities have also been limited due to physical distancing measures during the COVID-19 pandemic. These are avenues through which communities are engaged on GBV awareness and avenues for seeking help for survivors.

Moreover, families directly affected by COVID-19 face serious stigma from community members especially when a family has been confirmed to be positive or is suspected. Additional efforts, including raising awareness to counter stigmatization, need to be undertaken to ensure the protection of people affected by COVID-19.

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Situation Report
Analysis

Adamawa State Humanitarian Situation Overview

Adamawa State continues to experience increased humanitarian needs driven by conflict, attacks by non-state armed groups (NSAGs), and inter-communal clashes. Insecurity continues to pervade the state with a series of armed attacks in communities around the fringes of the Sambisa forest by NSAGs. The growing insecurity continues to hamper access to vulnerable returnees in Michika, Madagali, and now some parts of Gombi Local Government Area that require much needed relief and recovery assistance.

Read the full report here.

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