Nigeria

Situation Report

Highlights

  • Up to 5.1 million people risk being critically food insecure during the next lean season (June - August 2021), a level similar to 2016-2017 when famine was looming over Borno State
  • The UN Central Emergency Fund has allocated $15 million for urgent food aid. The Humanitarian Coordinator has called for the international community to follow and step up support
  • The number of people in need of urgent assistance in north-east Nigeria rose from 7.9 million at the beginning of 2020 to 10.6 million since the onset of COVID-19
  • Nigeria is now facing a second wave of COVID-19 infections. Borno, Adamawa, Yobe states have recorded new cases. Aid actors are intensifying actions and prevention measures
  • Despite challenges, aid workers had already provided over 4.3 million people with life-saving assistance in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states by the end of October.
IDP woman sorting grains in front of her shelter in Custom House camp, Maiduguri
November 2020 - IDP woman sorting grains in front of her shelter in Custom House camp, Maiduguri. Photo: OCHA/Maryam Ibrahim

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Situation Report

Key Figures

10.6M
People in need of humanitarian assistance
7.8M
People targeted for humanitarian aid
1.9M
People internally displaced
4.3M
People in need of food security assistance
1.1M
People in need of nutrition assistance
1.2M
People in inaccessible areas

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Nigeria

Situation Report

Funding

$1.1B
Required
$549.2M
Received
51%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Trond Jensen

Head of Office, OCHA Nigeria

Eve Sabbagh

Head of Public Information, OCHA Nigeria

Nigeria

Situation Report
Background
Elderly IDP in Custom House camp, Maiduguri
03 November 2020, Custom House IDP camp, Jere LGA, Borno State: Bulama Kadi doesn’t remember his age. But he remembers very well the day he had to flee his house when his village was attacked in Konduga LGA four years ago. Since then, he has been living in this overcrowded camp, in this shelter that he built himself. Every time it rains, water comes through. When there is wind, it becomes very cold inside. Bulama wishes he could go back to his land to farm, but it is still too dangerous. He now works in other farms, not too far from the camp, and this brings him a small revenue. “We don’t have enough food. We desperately need food and water closer to us. And of course, better shelters”. Only elderly people wear a face mask in the camp, though all have been sensitized about COVID-19. “Young people are not afraid of the disease, for us, older people, we are closer to the end than to the beginning. We try to make is last as long as possible.” “If I had to choose between a proper house in Maiduguri or going back to my land in Konduga, I would remain in Maiduguri because I am still afraid of Boko Haram. Even though in Konduga, I had a land and livestock, while here I don’t even have enough to buy clothes. But it is safer here.” Photo: OCHA/Eve Sabbagh

Situation Overview

The security situation across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe (BAY) states deteriorated significantly in October, marked by dozens of non-state armed group (NSAG) attacks and government forces counter-operations that affected civilian populations and impacted aid operations across locations. At least 49 civilians, including Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) and farmers were killed in direct attacks and clashes in Borno State. Most of the civilians were either targeted while cultivating farmlands and fishing to support livelihoods or caught in crossfire during clashes which spiked in October after the new military counter-operation “Fireball” was launched. Aid assets including two operational vehicles and water storage facilities were severely damaged in one of these clashes in Damboa LGA on 25 October. Civilian commuters and aid convoys were also routinely targeted, robbed or looted at illegal vehicle checkpoints (IVCPs) across major highways and supply routes especially in northern Borno State. At least 40 IVCP incidents targeting civilians and aid assets were recorded in October (more than in August and September combined), mostly in Borno State.

Movement of aid cargos, particularly food trucks to field locations including Damboa, Bama, Ngala and Kala-Balge LGAs of Borno State remained difficult due to flooding along major routes causing severe shortages for affected populations across camps and host communities. Using alternative but longer routes and exploring cash and voucher assistance (CVA) modalities, humanitarian partners were able to reach over 80,000 people with critical assistance such as food and NFIs across some of the worst affected locations in Damboa and Bama LGAs. The Nigerian military also airlifted some 80 tons of food to IDPs in the border town of Rann, Kala-Balge LGA which has been cut-off from Nigerian side by flooding since June. The situation remains dire particularly in Ngala LGA near the Cameroonian border where over 100,000 IDPs and host community populations continue to face severe food shortages. Initial reports from an ongoing nutrition screening indicate increasing cases of malnutrition particularly among children.

Flash flooding from heavy downpour between 5-11 October ravaged several communities in Bade and Jakuso LGAs of Yobe State with some 5,000 people, mostly farming households directly affected. Hundreds of homes were submerged for several days with property, valuables and hectares of cultivated farmlands washed away. Partners supported government response through the provision of food and NFI kits, and also co-led rapid assessment of impacts to inform further scale up of assistance to affected populations and communities. In Borno State, partners continued to scale up water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) response, reaching some 10,000 vulnerable people with cholera prevention kits in densely populated communities in MMC and Jere LGAs, as part of efforts to prevent outbreak of waterborne diseases during the peak of the rainy season. Over 1,000 households whose shelters were destroyed or damaged by flooding and windstorm in Bama LGA of Borno received shelter repair and reconstruction kits in October.

Efforts by humanitarian partners to decongest the main IDP camp in Banki, Bama LGA suffered a major setback when some 500 newly constructed shelters in the camp extension area were vandalized. Influx of refugees returning from neighboring Cameroon has increased in recent months. Some 2,500 people, including women and children, are currently without shelters and either staying with relatives or in open spaces where they are exposed to harsh weather and other protection risks. Partners are intensifying advocacy with military high command and community leaders to address issues around the camp extension area.

In October, Borno State Government continued with unilateral relocations of IDPs to return areas despite ongoing insecurity. High-level advocacy by the humanitarian community stressed on the need for a principled and multi-stakeholder approach to civilian relocations. On 7 October, the state government inaugurated two committees to facilitate IDP relocations to Marte LGA and Ngoshe, Ashigashiya, Kirawa and Hambagda communities in Gwoza LGA all of which are still inaccessible to aid workers due to insecurity. A week later, on 15 October, some 760 IDP households were moved from Pulka to Ngoshe town. IDP relocations to Baga town, Kukawa LGA, also continued with more than 4,000 people moved from Teachers’ Village camp in Maiduguri on 14 October. Over 11,000 IDPs originally from Baga and living across camps and host communities in Maiduguri have been registered for relocation in the coming weeks. Baga IDP relocation which started in late September was marred by deadly NSAG attacks targeting government convoys between 25 and 27 September with at least 18 killed, further indicating unresolved security concerns. Initial reports from rapid assessment conducted by local NGO partners indicate severe conditions for returnees including lack of health facilities or medical staff, and limited WASH services and livelihood opportunities. Similar conditions prevail in Ngoshe town where critical facilities and infrastructure were still at elementary stages when IDPs were relocated.

Daily counts of new COVID-19 cases continued to drop across the BAY states during the month of October, with only 10 active cases at the end of the month. This is partly due to lower testing rates, according to the Nigeria Center for Disease Control (NCDC). Aid actors intensified risk communication and awareness messaging including through mass media, community active case search, house-to-house enlightenment among others to encourage voluntary testing, timely reporting of suspected cases, and risk mitigation measures including use of masks and regular hand washing. Over 46,000 screenings were conducted at different points of entry (POEs) across BAY states, and travelers counselled on COVID-19 risks, symptoms, prevention/mitigation measures and steps to take in the event of suspected cases. Partners supported the decontamination and disinfection of isolation facilities across Yobe State. Implementation of preparedness measures including disinfection of classrooms, training of teachers/school managers and installation of WASH facilities in classrooms also continued in Borno State ahead of school reopening scheduled for 26 October. With the federal government projecting a spike and possible second wave of COVD-19 pandemic in the coming weeks and months, partners intensified advocacy with authorities and communities especially in Borno State on the provision of additional lands to decongest overcrowded camps and enable implementation of risk mitigation measures including social distancing.

Despite challenges posed by the COVID-19 pandemic and access constraints due to worsening insecurity and flooding from heavy downpours, humanitarian partners reached 3.8 million people (up from 3.6 million in September) with multisectoral assistance across BAY states in October. However, funding for the Humanitarian Response Plan 2020 is at a historic low. As of end of October, only $450 million (42%) of the total $1.08 billion funding required to provide life-saving assistance to 7.8 million people had been received.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Mine Action Sub-Sector

0.6M
People targeted for mine action sub-sector
$7.9M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

Borno State government plans to relocate or resettle internally displaced persons (IDPs) within their LGA of origin increase the need for humanitarian mine action activities, such as surveying land prior to return and explosive ordnance risk education. Relocation and resettlement plans also require efforts to train Nigerian institutions in the management of mine action in areas yet inaccessible to humanitarians.

However, despite increasing needs, measures taken to mitigate the spread of the COVID-19 pandemic and reduce risks for vulnerable populations mean a decreased number of people now benefit from risk education sessions to ensure physical distancing. Mine Action activities are also lower priority for the reduced UN Humanitarian Air Service to deep field locations.

In October 2020, 34 incidents with explosive hazards were recorded, and four people were injured and 3 were killed predominantly by landmines of an improvised nature. Nine of the accidents could have been prevented.

In November 2020, 41 incidents with explosive hazards were recorded, and 36 people were injured and killed predominantly by landmines of an improvised nature. Five of these accidents, such as civilians picking up explosive remnants of war, could have been prevented.

Response

In October, the Mine Action sub-sector (MASS) reached a total of 14,636 people through explosive ordnance risk education (EORE): 3,131 girls, 3,235 boys, 4,321 women, and 3,949 men. A total of 14 non-technical surveys (NTS) took place in Gwoza, Konduga, Dikwa, Mubi South and Madagali LGAs.

In November, a total of 11,257 people were reached through EORE: 2,825 girls, 2,926 boys, 3,393 women, and 2,113 men. A total of 7 NTS took place in Gwoza, Dikwa, Jere, Madagali, Mubi South, Michika LGAs.

Emergency First Responder training was conducted for 92 National Security and Civil Defence Corps (NSCDC) personnel, including 22 women. Advanced Emergency First Responder training was conducted for 16 people, including 8 women, in order to increase capacity to save lives and reduce the impact of explosive incidents. In November, MASS conducted EORE training of trainers for 32 staff from the National Emergency Management Agency and Borno State Emergency Management Agency, including 4 women. In addition, a Victim Assistance Specialist mapped needs and services for victims and survivors of explosive incidents.

In October, Nigeria requested an extension of the Article 5 of the Anti-Personnel Mine Ban Convention deadline and presented the request at the 18th Meeting of State Parties in November, with support from the MASS.

Gaps

The main challenges the sub-sector faces include an increase in needs and insufficient capacity, including funding, to address these, as well as limited possibility to interact with beneficiaries due to the COVID-19 pandemic. Funding remains a challenge since most operations are delivered through Community Liaison Teams. It is essential for the Mine Action partners to scale up capacity to survey lands prior to returns as well as to raise awareness to IDPs who are resettled.

The Mine Action sub-sector has addressed some of these challenges by recruiting a Medic who trained NSCDC personnel on emergency medical response to increase capacity to save lives and reduce the impact of explosive incidents on civilians, such as attacks involving ammunition or gunfire or road traffic accidents. In addition, a Victim Assistance Specialist was hired to map needs and services for victims and survivors of explosive incidents.

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Sector Status

Emergency Telecommunications

$3.0M
Funding required for ETS services (USD)
100
Organizations targeted

Needs

The ETS team continues to provide vital communications services – Internet connectivity in eight humanitarian hubs and security communications in 10 operational areas – to the humanitarian community across North-East Nigeria, throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Since January 2020, the ETS has provided Internet connectivity services to more than 4,401 users from 113 organizations (15 United Nations agencies and 98 non-governmental organizations/NGOs).

The COVID-19-related restrictions on the movement of humanitarians have required ETS staff to work from home to curb the spread of the virus in North-East Nigeria. During the reporting period, most ETS staff worked remotely, while five staff worked in the office at the Red Roof humanitarian hub in Maiduguri on a needs-based schedule.

Response

In November, the ETS programmed 13 radios to enable humanitarians to improve communication between staff and to ensure their safety and security in the region. The ETS helpdesk received and resolved 110 ICT-related issues reported by its users through email and phone. The team also conducted remote capacity building activities by delivering three training sessions on basic security telecommunications for 26 participants from Jireh Doo Foundation, International alert and the Agency for Technical Cooperation and Development (ACTED).

The ETS team embarked on missions to deep field locations – Dikwa, Gwoza and Ngala – to resolve technical issues that require the physical presence of ETS technicians. Similarly, an ETS telecommunications specialist embarked on a two-week support mission to the UN Department for Safety and Security (UNDSS) sites in Enugu and Sokoto to set up Security Operations Centres (SOCs) in those locations.

The ETS team participated in a joint meeting with Telecommunications Security Standards (TESS), UNDSS and WFP to discuss the set-up of a remote Security Operations Centre (SOC) in Maiduguri. The ETS will provide technical support to the UNDSS team.

Gaps

Due to COVID-19-related restrictions, the ETS has had to postpone several of its planned activities, including field missions to install the hybrid solar power system in all eight sites in Borno State where the ETS provides connectivity services. The pandemic has also delayed staff recruitment. However, as travel restrictions caused by COVID-19 have eased, the team has commenced planning to install the hybrid solar power system in field locations in December.

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Media
Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator standing before mass grave
Zabarmari, Borno State, 1 December 2020 - Resident and Humanitarian Coordinator, Mr Edward Kallon, standing before a mass grave where several farmers were buried on 29 November. Tens of farmers were killed in a violent non-state armed group attack on 28 November 2020. The attack is the deadliest in 2020, but only one of many recurring attacks against farmers, fishermen, and other civilians in conflict-affected Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states. Photo: OCHA/Eve Sabbagh

Humanitarian Coordinator Statement Following Condolences Visit to Zabarmari, Borno - 2 December 2020

There is no word to describe how I feel after my visit to Zabarmari communities yesterday. It is with great sadness, but also indignation, that I met the families of the victims of Saturday’s violent attack and their communities to extend my most sincere condolences, on behalf of the United Nations and humanitarian partners, and to commiserate with them on these atrocious circumstances.

Farmers and villagers I have met have retold accounts of unspeakable cruelty. Innocent civilians - men and women - were ruthlessly killed. Details on losses are still coming in and the search for missing people is still ongoing. More bodies are being recovered. Farmers have also reported some of the missing women may have been abducted. I call for these innocent women and girls to be immediately released and for their safe return to their communities.

With more slain civilians recovered almost every day since the attack, it is clear that this was an act of sheer inhumanity and abject cruelty. The perpetrators of this heinous and senseless act should be brought to justice.

I met with His Excellency Prof Babagana Umara Zulum, Governor of Borno State, as well as their Excellencies the Governors of Adamawa, Bauchi, Gombe, Taraba states and the Deputy Governor of Yobe State. We all agree that stabilizing and developing the north-east is not only important for the people living in these states but also crucial for the whole country and key to the sub-region. Full press statement here.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Food Security

3.3M
People targeted for food assistance
$315.1M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

The October 2020 Cadre Harmonize (CH) Analysis has been concluded. The projected number of people in need for the lean season (June to August) 2021 has significantly increased to about 5.1 million people in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states, representing a 19% and 72% increase as compared to the same period in 2020 (with COVID-19) and 2019 respectively. People projected to risk being in Emergency IPC Phase 4 during the 2021 lean season have increased by 130% and 45% as compared to 2019 and 2020 respectively. The projected number of people in need for 2021 is similar to 2016/2017.

According to the WFP October 2020 Market Monitoring, increased supply of newly harvested grains in the market is contributing to stabilizing or decreasing trends in prices of some staple food. This is likely to ease pressure on the purchasing power of market-dependent households. However, despite a recent stability in food prices, vulnerable households are fragilized by enduring conflict and access constraints restraining income-earning opportunities. Partners’ October Market Price Monitoring has not shown any significant changes in the Minimum Expenditure Basket (MEB). Therefore, aid actors pursued advocacy efforts towards an increase in CASH transfer values as indicated in the September advocacy note for increase in transfer value.

Procurement challenges, limited availability of military escorts and poor road conditions during the rainy season, led to delayed distributions to beneficiaries, particularly in Rann and Damasak. Communal asset creation activities are still limited by COVID-19 restrictions.

Response

In October, about 3.2 million people received food security assistance. Of these, 40 % received emergency food assistance and the remainder agricultural livelihoods assistance. This includes the assistance air-lifted by the government to Rann and actions within the COVID-19 response program which provides assistance to people whose vulnerability increased due to the economic fallout of the COVID-19. pandemic.

Sector partners provided key agriculture livelihoods support in October. Agro Processing Equipment, including rice mills, hammer mills, mobile threshers, mini pepper millers and oil presses were distributed to 540 vulnerable households in Borno State, 60 households in Yobe State and 90 households in Adamawa State. Partners also provided inputs or kits to Group Savings and Loan Associations in Gwoza, Dikwa, Bama, Jere, Kaga, Monguno, Biu, Konduga, Ngala, Dikwa and Mafa LGAs of Borno state. About 950 vulnerable female beneficiaries’ households received Noiler chicks and poultry feeds across the BAY States (150 in Borno, 600 in Adamawa and 200 in Yobe)

The Food Security sector together with WASH, CCCM and Protection sectors continued their joint approach on messaging, hygiene kit delivery, social-distancing and protection-related monitoring and referrals.

The Food Security sector also joined support and advocacy efforts regarding the relocation of IDPs to 20 locations in 12 LGAs preliminarily identified by Borno State government. The sector is reaching out to some of the partners in the respective LGAs (Project Targeted Locations and LGAs) to determine the possibility of providing some support to relocated IDPs.

Food Security sector (FSS) Information Management (IM) trainings were conducted for partners in Yola, Adamawa State, on 14-15 October, and in Damaturu, Yobe State, on 19-20 October.

Gaps

The sector continues to advocate for the provision of cooking fuel as part of the food assistance and FSS partners are doing a rapid assessment in order to identify how to best transfer the 2,000-Naira monthly cooking fuel support to beneficiaries.

Partners are highly encouraged to use the most Updated Food Basket Transfer value calculators and can contact the sector for further details.

Programme Criticality (PC) 2 activities have been included among priority deep-field travels in addition to PC1, which will facilitate aid delivery in coming weeks.

Food Security sector meetings, including the four COVID-19 taskforces, will continue through teleconference.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Child Protection Sub-Sector

1.8M
People targeted for child protection
$27.3M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

According to the Voices of Young Children and Adolescents on their Well-Being in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe States report by the Child Protection sub-sector (CPSS) in September and October 2020, freedom from physical and sexual violence, resumption of schooling, education for all children and resumption of peace/end of conflict in north-east Nigeria are some of the key issues children feel impact their well-being. Specific needs and priorities identified by 6-17-year-old girls included freedom from sexual violence, the need for physical safety in the communities they are living in and the opportunity to pursue primary, secondary and higher education. Opportunities and facilities to play and practice sports were identified as important by girls and boys across all age groups under 18 years.

Response

Following the launch of the CPIMS+/Primero in north-east Nigeria, 139 child protection case management staff (67 female, 72 male) from three government ministries, one national NGO and three international NGOs were trained on the use of the platform as of October 2020. These agencies became the first child protection agencies to use the CPIMS+ in Nigeria. The CPIMS+/Primero application is a software that helps partners securely collect, store, manage, and share data for protection-related incident monitoring and case management. Training of other child protection case management actors will continue through a phased plan that will run until May 2021.

In October, the CPSS conducted an orientation session for the Logistics Sector on child protection, the various forms of protection risks for children and their consequences and how logistics actors can help prevent and mitigate protection risks for children. This is part of the sub-sector’s drive to enhance integration of child protection in the humanitarian response in north-east Nigeria.

In October, the CPSS also conducted a survey with child protection actors in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe states which sought to understand the perspectives of child protection actors on priority needs, severity of needs and response strategies including integration of child protection in other sectors or the humanitarian response. The CPSS also conducted an online consultation with sector leads and co-leads to review and improve collaboration. Feedback from these consultations will complement the secondary data analysis and multi-sector needs assessment that have been conducted and will be used to inform the HNO and HRP in addition to the analysis by the CPSS Coordination Team.

Gaps

Child protection remains significantly underfunded, with only US$0.9M reported on the UN OCHA Financial Tracking System as of September 2020. As of October 2020, only 33 per cent of children and caregivers out of the total targeted population were reached with child protection. Only 37% of the targeted children had been reached with family tracing and reunification services and only 56% of the targeted children and vulnerable caregivers had been reached with psychosocial support services. In total, only 372,105 out of the targeted 1,070,000 children and vulnerable caregivers had been reached with child protection services in Adamawa, Borno and Yobe, representing only 35% of the total target.

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Sector Status

Education

$54.5M
Funding required (USD)
3.1M
People targeted for education assistance

Needs

Many remote education programmes were coming to their end in October. For many actors and donors, schools must resume as planned by the states and remote (Radio and TV) programmes are experiencing lack of funds. This situation leaves many children without access to education for a short period before schools effectively resume. Some schools have resumed but there are still only a few actors to support them. Due to security and logistics issues, partners work through existing national structures in different LGAs. Many LGAs cannot be reached and this has an adverse effect on monitoring and supporting the resumption of schools.

Response

In terms of fund raising, under the sector leadership, Nigeria has developed a multi-year resilience programme submitted to Education Cannot Wait with a total of $20.1M. Three grantees have been selected: UNICEF, Save the Children International and one consortium formed by Street Child and the Norwegian Refugee Council. Feedback is expected in November. Several meetings have been conducted with SUBEB in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa states to prepare the safe reopening of schools. A list of needs has been prepared and shared with different organizations to allow them to support the SUBEBs in a coordinated manner. The sector has worked with SAG members to operationalize the localisation strategy that will allow national NGOs to access to 25% of the sector funding as well as develop their capacity through mentorship or consortiums with international NGOs. A one-pager guide was developed to lead grantees on how to involve, strengthen and guide national organizations in the implementation process. With regards to coordination, the sector has worked with FHI360 to reinforce coordination in Yobe State. The focal point in-charge of coordination was provided with latest updates and tools, such as report hub and the matrix of priorities and gaps, which will help operationalize coordination in reporting.

Gaps

Coordinating Education at the LGA level remains a challenge. The sector needs a fully dedicated staff for Borno and Yobe states. Due to logistics issue the sector staff, other than making frequent trips, are not able to increase their presence in those two states and many local organizations and states structures are not very familiar with remote work and are less technology savvy. Only a few international organizations can actively be part of the coordination activities.

The sector needs to support State Ministries of Education to safely re-open schools, especially in IDP camps, and ensure that all TLS (Temporary Learning Spaces) will open and all IDP learners will have access to a safe and protective learning environment during this COVID-19 period. On the same note, students, teachers and schools still face challenges in concluding the last term of the 2019-2020 school year and to prepare the back to school campaign for 2020 – 2021.

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Sector Status

Camp Coordination and Camp Management

1.2M
People targeted for CCCM support
$26.5M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

In September, the Camp Coordination and Camp Management (CCCM) sector continued to advocate for the decongestion strategy and progress in key areas at LGA level. Operational partners are now ready to deploy for implementation. Top priority locations such as Dikwa, Ngala and Bama (Banki LGA) are being prioritized for decongestion and the Borno State government has given approval for partners to use identified land in Dikwa and Bama (Banki). The Zulum IDP camp has been completed and will facilitate the decongestion of the IS camp in Ngala by accommodating about 883 Households (HH).

As steps to improve the delivery of CCCM activities, Sector partners throughout September ensured thorough sensitization on COVID-19 related risks and prevention measures in camps and camp-like settings throughout September. The campaign focused on personal and environmental hygiene, and general sanitation on site. It also included the creation of water pathways as well as weekly routine infrastructural assessment of site facilities to identify gaps and basic needs.

Furthermore, a total of 6,653 HH are currently staying in reception centres across Pulka, Banki, Bama, Dikwa and Konduga. Mobar (Damasak LGA) witnessed an increase in influx of returnees resulting in the congestion of the temporary camp. Over 400HH reside in makeshift shelters while over 855 HH remain without shelter, hence sleeping in the open.

Response

Throughout September Sector partners scaled up efforts in advocating and mobilizing for prompt responses to the cross-sectoral gaps reported by CCCM operational partners. Coordination meetings were held in 110 of the 160 sites benefitting from CCCM interventions. Additionally, sensitization and awareness-raising activities to control the spread of the COVID-19 virus as well as participation of populations at risk were reinforced through focus group discussions and house-to-house sessions. Reminding of prevention practices such as handwashing and physical distancing are now part of the daily interventions in camps and camp-like settings.

Over 600 complaints by beneficiaries were received across sites, with the majority of the complaints relating to food, especially in Banki. In support of greater accountability to affected populations, 521 of these complaints were referred to partners from relevant sectors, while about 168 complaint files were closed.

Gaps

Land advocacy and decongestion of highly congested camps or reception centers in the BAY states will remain the main priority for the sector. Other priorities include implementing a rigorous community mobilization and sensitization campaign towards decongestion in order to gauge the perceptions and understand the fears and expectations of the affected populations as well as ensure maximum participation in the process. The CCCM sector and its partners must ensure ownership of the process along with close coordination and guidance from the local government.

As CCCM partners continue to scale up the delivery of activities in Camps and Camp-like settings, they will continue advocacy and mobilization to bridge the gaps raised by partners. The sector will also conduct more field visits in an effort to swiftly support partners in every way possible, ranging from flagging issues from camp level to sector and Inter-Sectoral Working Group (ISWG) levels.

In view of improving the sub-sector coordination in Adamawa and Yobe states, a visit is planned for the coming weeks to improve coordination and aid delivery.

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Sector Status

Nutrition

0.8M
People targeted for nutrition assistance
$103.5M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

The nutrition situation in the BAY states significantly deteriorated in September with increased rates of acute malnutrition attributed to the reduced access to food during the ongoing lean season (increased food prices, low harvest) and disease outbreak. Continued insecurity also generated disruption of health and nutrition services and new population displacements.

The number of severely acutely malnourished children admitted into the nutrition treatment programme continues to be high compared to September 2019. The number of children with severe acute malnutrition admitted into the treatment programs increased by 30% in September compared to August, clearly indicating a seasonal period of high prevalence of malnutrition lasting longer than in previous years.

To address the continued increase in acute malnutrition rates, the Nutrition sector requires additional resources including Ready-to-use Therapeutic Food (RUTF), supplementary foods to expand MAM treatment, and funding to expand the stabilization centres capacities. The sector also requires MUAC tapes to scale-up the family/mother MUAC approach to ensure households are empowered to monitor the nutritional status of their children. The sector will also require resources to strengthen the existing surveillance system and monitor the nutrition situation.

In particular, the sector requires additional resources to establish temporary stabilizations centres and mobile outpatient therapeutic programmes in areas affected by insecurity, including Magumeri, Gubio and Mobbar LGAs.

Response

In September 2020, Nutrition sector partners admitted 28,723 severely malnourished children into the treatment programs. The total number of severely malnourished children admitted up to September 2020 is approximately 70% of the annual target. Over 90 per cent of all children in the outpatient therapeutic programmes and stabilisation centers (SCs) were successful treated and discharged as cured. However, approximately 4% of the children admitted in the SCs died. The major cause of mortality is attributed to caregivers seeking health and nutrition treatment only when their children are presenting advanced poor nutritional status and medical complications. The delay in seeking treatment is often due to use of traditional herbal concoctions and the lack of nutrition services in areas affected by insecurity. Three children have died every day in the BAY states on average since the beginning of the year.

To prevent and treat moderate acute malnutrition (MAM), Sector partners reached approximately 105,000 children between six and 23 months and 55,000 pregnant and breastfeeding women from food insecure households through the blanket supplementary feeding programme (BSFP). In addition, an average of 4,631 children between 24 and 59 months with MAM were also included in the BSFP.

In September, partners reached a monthly average of 8,000 children ages six to 59 months with MAM through the facility-based targeted supplementary feeding programme (TSFP) in selected communities in Jere and Kaga LGAs in Borno State and 10 LGAs in Yobe State. The number of MAM admitted into the TSFP increased by 40% compared to previous months clearly indicating deterioration of the nutritional status of the children in the targeted areas.

To prevent micronutrient deficiencies among children from six to 23 months, Sector partners reached 42,106 children with micronutrient supplementation powders (MNP).

To promote the prevention of acute malnutrition, Nutrition Sector partners provided infant and young child feeding (IYCF) counselling to 77,029 caregivers and 18,799 pregnant women at health facilities. The number of caregivers and pregnant women reached increased compared to the past few months as community members have resumed utilising health and nutrition services that were disrupted by COVID-19 pandemic.

Gaps

The main challenge facing the Nutrition sector is the lack of capacity to effectively respond to sudden onset emergencies due to escalating insecurity. Insecurity has resulted in disruptions of nutrition services in places including Gubio, Magumeri, Mafa, and Mobbar LGAs in Borno State and in Geidam and Gujba LGAs in Yobe State.

The prolonged lean season had added pressure on the low stabilization centres capacities to cope with the increased rates of SAM cases with medical complications who require intensive medical care and increased mortality rate. The Sector requires additional resources to increase the coverage of SCs in Yobe and Adamawa states and to establish temporary SCs in partially accessible areas like Magumeri and Gubio LGAs.

There is a growing number of under-nourished and separated infants as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic, increased population displacement and armed conflict. Prevention and management of wasting among infants, particularly for the non-breastfed, is a highly technical and resource-demanding initiative which the north-east is lacking at the moment.

The Sector is currently developing the guidance, but significant resources are required to scale-up the identification and treatment of children under 6 months.

The increased malnutrition rates require the Sector to increase its surveillance and early warning mechanism capacity to ensure that the nutritional situation is closely monitored, and effective response put in place to prevent further deterioration.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Shelter and Non-Food Items

$76.3M
Funding required (USD)
1.0M
People targeted for Shelter/NFI support

Needs

At the end of September, 55,464 Household (HH) needed shelter and 64,373 HH needed NFI assistance across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states. The shelter/NFIs needs are generated by forced displacement due to attacks, natural disaster, and poor living conditions. According to Sector partners reports, the majority of the affected populations in need are Internally Displaced Persons (IDPs) in camps, IDPs in host community and returnees who are living in makeshift shelters or shelters that are either partially or completely damaged and affected by floods. Up to 1,522 HH of IDPs , including 800 HH in Magumeri and 627 HH in Gongulong, were sleeping out in the open and constrained to use inadequate materials to construct provisional shelters. They have limited access to NFIs and fully rely on humanitarian assistance to survive. A better, durable solution is needed to address the risks and vulnerabilities of the affected population and reduce dependency on humanitarian assistance. The volatile security situation has immensely affected the response. Shelter and NFI Sector activities (Shelter and NFI) have been hindered and Partners movements are restricted. Areas where people are most in need, such as Magumeri, are hard to reach for aid workers. Indeed, a needs assessment conducted in Magumeri in August highlighted the urgent need for shelter and NFI for the new arrivals. However, they have not yet received assistance due to the difficulty to access the area. Land Issues continue to affect humanitarian action directly across Borno State Local Government Areas (LGAs) since most available land is outside the military safety perimeter, where movement is restricted.

Response

In September, the Shelter Monitoring committee conducted a monitoring visit to observe practices and make recommendations for improvements to ongoing shelter construction by its active shelter partners in Borno State. The Sector carried out field visits to evaluate the proposed decongestion of IDP hosting sites in Dikwa. The sector, shelter partners and government authorities continue working together towards a coordinated approach for the decongestion strategy to ensure that vulnerable displaced populations in need of durable shelter benefit properly from the response. Across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe (BAY) states, shelter needs for 1,032 HH were addressed, including emergency shelter, emergency shelter kits distribution and shelter rehabilitation. A total of 2,880 individuals received 576 HH emergency shelter kits. This response is designed to provide temporary and immediate shelter assistance. Another 97 HH were assisted with emergency shelter (Bama type), and 359 HH were supported with the rehabilitation of the damaged permanent structure.

Lastly, 29,626 people were provided with NFI kits, necessary for daily use and aimed at improving the dignity of the affected population.

Gaps

The Shelter/NFI/CCCM Sectors are working with their partners to scale up the provision of immediate life-saving assistance to meet Shelter and NFIs needs, but also ensure preparedness through prepositioning sufficient contingency NFIs and Shelter stocks in key areas across the BAY states.

The Shelter/NFI and CCCM Sectors continue to focus on coordinating the provision of minimum assistance packages for IDPs in hosting sites and addressing access issues in collaboration with authorities.

Access remains difficult for humanitarian agencies to reach the most vulnerable and affected populations who need services. Progress is being made in close collaboration with all agencies and government to ensure that vulnerable individuals are benefitting from all basic amenities. The Shelter response continues to be significantly delayed compared to NFIs due to the lack of land available for construction. The Sector continues to advocate for more land through various means.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Protection (General)

$25.1M
Funding required (USD)
2.5M
People targeted for protection assistance

Needs

The security situation across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe (BAY) states continues to remain volatile. In September there were multiple attempts by non-state armed group (NSAG) operatives to infiltrate IDP camps, such as in Banki, in Bama LGA, and in Jere LGA, in Borno State.

There were at least 22 abduction in September, mostly targeting IDPs cultivating crops in their farmlands or fetching firewood for subsistence across locations such as MMC, Damboa, Mobbar (Damasak) and Ngala LGAs in Borno State.

In Adamawa State, organised criminal groups continued to target civilians and humanitarian actors; while in Yobe State, threats of NSAG attacks particularly in  return communities in Gujba LGA remained high throughout September, causing panic among populations. 

Critical challenges for affected people including lack of livelihood opportunities, food insecurity and inflated prices have increased tension across IDP camps and host communities, forcing affected and vulnerable populations to adopt negative coping mechanisms including transactional sex and street begging. The Borno State Government's plan to return IDPs to some LGAs witnessing escalating clashes and attacks raised concerns of safety and continued access of IDPs to critical assistance and services. Many of the areas listed for IDP relocation are still inaccessible to aid agencies due to ongoing insecurity.

Response

In September, the Protection Sector stepped up advocacy with key actors, including state and local authorities, protection partners and other sectors, to ensure that affected people’s protection needs were highlighted and addressed. Protection partners also conducted a joint rapid assessment at Muna El Badawee camp in Jere LGA of Borno, where there was an influx of new arrivals following attacks in neighbouring locations.

Various assessments in September revealed that many IDPs wish to return to their areas of origin, providing certain conditions, particularly adequate security and provision of basic amenities, are met by authorities. The Sector engaged with protection actors to coordinate data collection regarding IDP return intentions and conditions in return areas. The Sector advocated, including with local authorities, donors and the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT), for an inclusive process that involves inputs from IDP communities and protection actors for all relocation activities.

The Sector also facilitated high level meetings to present and articulate the position of the humanitarian community to ensure a principled and sustainable returns process. Discussions on the 2021 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) have been initiated, and the Protection Sector North-East (PSNE) is engaging with relevant partners on finalising indicators and People in Need (PiN) elements. The Sector also partook and contributed to the finalization of indicators for the Safe Access to Fuel and Energy (SAFE) activities.

Gaps

The deteriorating security situation remains the main cause of displacements. Ongoing unilateral relocation of IDPs by Borno State Government, expected to continue in the coming weeks despite safety and security risks triggered by escalating attacks and clashes, is a major concern for Sector partners. The Sector and its partners are likely to face serious challenges in this regard, especially as some of the relocations are taking place at short notice and to areas which are still inaccessible to humanitarian actors. The Sector will continue to advocate for voluntary, safe, principled and sustainable returns and durable solutions, and coordinate data collection, including by finalising its harmonised protection monitoring tool.

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Situation Report
Visuals and Data
Humanitarian Dashboard (January to June 2020)

North-East Nigeria Humanitarian Dashboard (January to June 2020)

Between January and June, the United Nations and humanitarian partners have reached a total of 2.6 million people with humanitarian assistance (around 34 percent of the people targeted) across 61 Local Government Areas (LGAs) in Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe States of north-east Nigeria. Life-saving emergency interventions remain the immediate priority. Despite significant achievements by the humanitarian community, millions of affected people are still facing hunger; lack protection; have limited or no access to health facilities or to water, sanitation and hygiene; or live in overcrowded camp conditions, with some of them still sleeping in the open. In various areas across the three states, levels of acute malnutrition for children under five are above emergency thresholds. The impact of the ongoing COVID-19 pandemic, rising insecurity and funding shortfalls still pose challenges to aid organisations providing urgent assistance to some of the most vulnerable people in north-east Nigeria.

Full dashboard here

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Situation Report
Feature
Falmata
Falmata (right) is relaxed and busy in knitting a traditional cap. Photo: CIDAR

Greater safety for vulnerable women and girls in camps

For women and girls living in IDP camps, the most natural everyday actions can be source of anxiety and danger. Falmata Bukar, 25, tells us how an intervention from Center for Integrated Development and Research (CIDAR) is making her feel more secure and helping her lead a life in dignity.

Falmata fled her home in Mafa Local Government Area of Borno State four years ago. She and her siblings are living alone in the Muna El-Badawi Camp, on the outskirts of Borno State capital Maiduguri. Falmata refuses to be lingering in the camp and sitting idle causes her frustration. She can be seen knitting caps for several hours in front of her shelter. The occupation brings her some revenue to support her family.

She however had, until recently, been living in constant apprehension. She had been concerned about her extreme vulnerability every time she had to go to ease herself. Toilets blocks in the camp were far away from her shelter and in deplorable state as nobody was willing to wash them, and the smell was intolerable. Some organisations used to give detergent, disinfectants and cleaning tools at regular intervals but these were never sufficient to maintain the facilities. Many IDPs preferred open defecation to entering the toilet blocks, and the entire area used to smell. And it was even worse when it was raining.

Falmata and other women and girls in her part of the camp preferred to go to nearby bushes. Fulmata recalls how stressful this was for her as she had to wait for hours and was often going in the dark, at night. She felt unprotected and unsafe. She always tried to accompany someone from the family or asked a friend to escort her. This was nerve-racking and she was extremely uncomfortable.

On 23 May, a fire broke out in the camp and ravaged many shelters in the camp. All her belonging were burned down to ashes. Many aid organisations provided immediate support, With funding from the NHF, CIDAR constructed six blocks of latrines and showers close to where her shelter was rebuilt. “Now, I don’t fear for safety when I need to go to the toilets anymore,” explained Falmata. “I feel safer even when I have to go alone at night. These toilets are protected and covered. Women, girls and children can make use of these sanitation facilities at any time of the day and night.”

Falmata’s family and neighbours receive support from CIDAR to clean, disinfect and conduct general maintenance of these sanitation facilities. Toilet Users’ Groups have been constituted to look after newly constructed sanitation facilities (WASHCOMs) and they conduct the daily cleaning. “Even our younger brothers and sisters now easily go to the toilets. Fear of going to the toilets is now history!” she said, laughing.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

WASH

$104.1M
Funding required (USD)
2.5M
People targeted for WASH assistance

Needs

WASH needs increased significantly across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe (BAY) states as a result of flooding incidents across camps and host communities as the rainy season approached its peak. The situation is further complicated by poor hygiene and sanitation practices including improper waste disposal, blocking water channels and increasing risks of flooding during heavy downpours.

The ongoing response to COVID-19 prevention measures requires scale up of regular risk mitigation and awareness messaging and distribution of hygiene kits by partners. In camps, there is, on average only one latrine for over 50 people, and in some camps even only one latrine per 100 IDPs, particularly in Jere, Monguno and Konduga LGAs of Borno State.

With ongoing heavy rains and constant flooding, sector partners are prioritizing the dislodgement of filled latrines across camps, while congestion in some camps puts pressure on available sanitation facilities with little or no space for installation of new ones.

Delays in delivery of WASH construction materials from Maiduguri to Dikwa LGA in Borno due to security clearance slowed the response throughout the month of August. In Konduga and other locations, the theft of submersible pumps has led to water supply shortages and increased pressure on existing water points.

Response

To prevent the risk of outbreak of deadly diseases such as cholera and acute watery diarrhea (AWD) during the rainy season, WASH partners scaled up distribution of sanitation and hygiene kits throughout August, and increased risk awareness and mitigation messaging across camps and communities. In Gwoza (Pulka), Monguno and Damboa LGAs of Borno State, partners trucked some 900m3 of water to increase access to clean water for affected populations in camps and host communities.

WASH partners implemented response activities and interventions while observing COVID-19 risk mitigation guidelines, ensuring physical distancing and raising awareness of beneficiaries. Some 28 LGAs across the BAY states were targeted by 20 partners with sensitization messaging, reaching 153,000 individuals. A total of 4,330 hygiene kits were distributed to affected and vulnerable households across 20 LGAs that also benefitted from hygiene promotion sensitization sessions.

Through the Cholera/COVID-19 Technical Working Group, WASH partners planned, coordinated and implemented mass cholera campaigns between 21-25 August, reaching 178,394 individuals with awareness messaging on safe water chain, hygiene promotion and sanitation, with additional 14,450 hygiene kits distributed to beneficiaries.

With an in-kind donation from UNILEVER Nigeria, UNICEF provided 510,648 bars of soap (equivalent to a two-month supply), 1,625 drums of Calcium Hypochlorite (HTH) and 1,808 bags of lime to support urban water chlorination in Borno and Adamawa states. WASH partners drilled additional 10 boreholes in four LGAs across Borno State while further hydrogeological studies are ongoing to find new water points. Continous latrine disinfection, rehabilitation and new construction are ongoing, while the Sanitation TWG is reviewing latrine designs for camps to improve access to sanitation, ensure improved privacy for women and children, while adhering to specifications allowing easy dislodging and improving latrine lifespan.

Gaps

WASH partners have benefited from close collaboration with the Health Sector through exchange of data on AWD cases which facilitates the identification of areas with increased risks of cholera outbreak. However, flooding from heavy rainfalls and increased needs have impacted core pipeline materials with low stocks in field locations. The translation of Information, Education and Communication (IEC) materials to local languages and dialects is urgently needed across LGAs.

The water table in some areas in the BAY states has low or non-existent groundwater, forcing partners to rely solely on water trucking. Further groundwater monitoring, geological and hydrogeological surveys have been planned for the coming months to generate additional and more sustainable water sources.

Sanitation and waste management needs remain critical, with the Sector partners exploring different consultancy arrangements as palliative measures.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Housing, Land and Property Sub-Sector

$0.4M
Funding required (USD)
0.9M
People targeted for HLP assistance

Needs

In August, the Housing Land and Property (HLP) sub-sector received requests to respond to eviction cases involving IDPs living in rented accommodations within host communities, particularly in Borno State. This was attributed to the inability to pay rental charges and the influx of IDPs to host communities and settlements, incurring charges from landowners, as many official camps are already congested and stretched beyond capacity.

Response

To raise awareness on HLP rights, the sub-sector organized trainings and activities in August including a two-day training for 25 IDP women groups from various camps across Borno State, in collaboration with the Borno State Ministry of Women Affairs and Social Development. The training aimed to increase women’s understanding of HLP rights and how to exercise these rights.

A three-day training for ACTED Camp Coordination and Camp Management/Shelter staff aimed to strengthen mainstream HLP rights, to ensure the sustainability of interventions with an emphasis on services provided in informal camps.

In Adamawa State, the sub-sector in collaboration with the state branch of the Nigerian Bar Association (NBA) organized a one-day HLP/Access to Justice workshop on resolving HLP disputes for IDPs and returnees and the role of the NBA and legal practitioners in general. Key recommendations include, the need to: intensify advocacy on IDPs and returnees’ rights to HLP restitution; raise awareness on the Kampala Convention; collaborate with the International Federation of Women Lawyers (FIDA) and other CSOs to step up awareness on HLP needs of IDPs and returnees; and for the NBA to engage with Ministry of Justice to develop priorities and guide justice sector reforms related to IDPs.

The sub-sector also held an interactive session with land officers in Adamawa State to address the lack of documentation/record of rights/titles for housing and lands which were not necessarily needed before the crisis, but have now become important evidence of property ownership, particularly for IDPs returning from displacement locations. Norwegian Refugee Council's Information Counselling and Legal Assistance (ICLA) unit provided HLP legal assistance services to 575 IDP returnees on the recovery or replacement of lost documentation in Damboa and Gwoza LGAs of Borno State.

The sub-sector is reviewing eviction guidance tools to effectively mitigate and manage eviction issues. The sub-sector participated in the HLP Evictions & Relocations Interest Group meeting on the 20 August, which explored measures to protect the rights of tenants/occupants and ensure they are clearly informed of their eviction, and are given a “reasonable notice” of departure to enable them to find alternative housing solutions. For ‘informal’ evictions and departures, negotiation for reasonable notice by landlords/landowners – with period of reasonable notice to be determined by the tenant and ideally be around 15 days to one month – was proposed.

In Madinatu camp, Jere LGA of Borno State, some 11 households were evicted from the land they had been occupying for over two years by the land owner on the premise of wanting to put the land to personal use. The HLP sub-sector was able to facilitate access to alternative land for the affected IDPs. Sub-sector partners provided the IDPs with NFIs and building kits for the construction of shelters.

Gaps

The sub-sector continues to identify eviction cases through field visits and referrals from community leaders, sector partners and NNGOs/CBOs for HLP legal assistance due to inability of IDPs to pay rent. Most of the eviction cases are from Borno and Adamawa states, and are largely attributed to the lack of livelihoods to generate income for rent, and the economic hardship exacerbated by the COVID-19 pandemic. With limited donors funding “cash-for-rent” interventions, the existing gaps remain huge, leaving many IDPs at risk of forced evictions.

The sub-sector will continue monitoring informal IDP sites to mitigate and prevent evictions, while also responding to cases of threats of eviction and actual eviction through engagements with traditional/community and government stakeholders.

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Godiya Ibrahim loves seeing people smile. This is one of the reasons why she is working as Programme Coordinator for Mercy Corps, helping people affected by the humanitarian crisis in Borno State. She is one of the Real Life Heroes we thanked on World Humanitarian Day and thank every day for their dedication to help the most vulnerable people.

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Situation Report
Analysis

Yobe State Humanitarian Situation Analysis (April to June 2020)

Conflict continued in Yobe State, including NSAG attacks and clashes with government forces along the LGAs of Geidam and Gujba, bordering Borno State. The security situation in these LGAs remains unpredictable and volatile. Government forces continue to carry out operations and maintain a high level of alertness following NSAG activities across border LGAs.

There is a significant increase in the threats of attacks on both civilian and military convoys, abduction/kidnapping (at illegal vehicle checkpoints), and IEDs along these routes. UXOs also pose a threat, with incidents reported in June in Gujba LGA, with the police issuing warning of widespread threats across the LGAs, particularly across farming areas. NSAG attacks were targeting civilian communities across Bursari, Geidam, Gujba LGAs, and abductions in Lantewa, Tarmuwa LGA along the Damaturu – Babangida road. An attack in Buni Gari (27/04/2020), Gujba LGA, resulted in the burning down of activity centers of some humanitarian actors in the community, which triggered a temporary suspension of operations.

Download the full report here.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Gender-Based Violence Sub-Sector

1.3M
People targeted for GBV assistance
$35.3M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

The COVID-19 pandemic is heightening already existing vulnerabilities for gender-based violence, reducing survivors access to report, seek help or receive quality response services. In some situations, there has been an increase in the incidents of GBV; however, in north-east Nigeria, restrictions and lockdown measures have presented barriers for survivors who are seeking help and service provision.

Organizations providing GBV services have had to adapt and apply flexible approaches, in order to continue providing service for survivors and people in need. The GBV Sub-Sector has engaged in the development of COVID-19 response strategies, collaborating with the COVID-19 Task Force and supporting partners to maintain service provision.

Response

The GBV Sub-Sector (GBVSS) developed technical and strategic guidance notes and strategies, as well as compiled and shared relevant resources for partners to support response actions in the COVID-19 context. The resources are on GBV case management, the GBV information management system (GBVIMS), safe space management, PSEA, and other relevant resources. Staff have received appropriate training on adapting new guidelines and guidance notes to service provision.

The GBVSS facilitated the transition to remote service provision in the context of COVID-19. Partners established confidential spaces including service provision hubs to provide remote services through telephone helplines throughout the COVID-19 pandemic in Maiduguri, Pulka and Monguno (Borno State). This enhanced access to GBV case management and psychosocial support services for survivors and other vulnerable individuals.

Facilities and service delivery points for GBV services, such as women and girl’s friendly spaces, integrated/women empowerment facilities, and one stop centres, have set up hand washing facilities and put hygiene measures in place to ensure staff and beneficiaries adhere to public health standards. Partners also set up designated areas (temporary confinement spaces or rooms) with dignity for beneficiaries showing signs or symptoms of COVID-19 while health teams are contacted. Partners also procured and provided COVID-19 prevention items and supplies to protection desks and women and girls friendly spaces. Moreover, GBV response teams in referral centres are following Infection, Prevention and Control procedures.

The GBVSS conducted mapping of critical GBV response stakeholders and updated GBV referral pathways. To support GBV response teams to respond appropriately, they were provided with personal protection supplies such as face masks, hand sanitizers, gloves, and other protective gear to meet the logistical needs of GBV survivors. GBV/PSEA messages were developed focusing on reporting channels, GBV service availability and referral pathways. The GBVSS also started the process of scaling up the rollout of Primero/GBVIMS+ to document case management practices during lockdowns with limited engagement. Given that remote service provision has risks associated with guaranteeing safety and confidentiality, GBVIMS+/Primero facilitates ethical and confidential incident data management and security.

The GBV Sub-Sector conducted a test run of Smart RR - a mobile application which enables survivors, social workers and service providers to report and refer GBV incidents to relevant service providers and authorities, conducts service mapping, automatically updates the referral directory, and collects and analyses referral data. The application is an innovation of a local NGO partner, built on the referral mechanism of the GBV Sub-Sector to mitigate existing challenges such as under-reporting and difficulties associated with accessing services.

Gaps

The reduced presence of humanitarian personnel, especially in some of the deep field locations, has strained available services and limited access to GBV service provision. Meanwhile, frontline staff and response teams lack access to adequate basic personal supplies to enable them to respond appropriately to the identified needs.

Community-based GBV prevention activities have also been limited due to physical distancing measures during the COVID-19 pandemic. These are avenues through which communities are engaged on GBV awareness and avenues for seeking help for survivors.

Moreover, families directly affected by COVID-19 face serious stigma from community members especially when a family has been confirmed to be positive or is suspected. Additional efforts, including raising awareness to counter stigmatization, need to be undertaken to ensure the protection of people affected by COVID-19.

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Situation Report

Sector Status

Early Recovery

1.6M
People targeted for early recovery
$112.7M
Funding required (USD)

Needs

The economic crisis as a result of the COVID-19 pandemic is affecting communities and local economies in Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states. Lockdown measures and movement restrictions have disrupted livelihood opportunities. Reduction of basic services and livelihoods are exacerbating the vulnerabilities of affected people such as increased unemployment and loss of remittances. Daily laborers and people engaging in cash-for-work activities are the most affected due to restricted labour migration and closure of small businesses. Youth and women in the informal sector are also hard hit. Supply shortages as a result of movement restrictions are also reducing economic opportunities and decreasing rural and urban incomes thereby affecting people’s ability to buy basic commodities. This economic downturn is making it more difficult to lay the foundations for sustainable recovery and a return to longer term development in the north-east.

Response

In March and April, Early Recovery partners continued to rehabilitate or construct market stalls and classroom blocks in Adamawa State. Partners rehabilitated six market stalls in Madagali LGA and built two new ones in Michika LGA. In addition, five classroom blocks in Madagali LGA and four in Michika LGA were rehabilitated. Partners also started rehabilitation work on two slaughterhouses in Adamawa State. To complete the various rehabilitation and construction work, partners provided emergency employment opportunities to 74 skilled workers and 842 unskilled workers through the cash-for-work modality.

In Askira/Uba LGA of Borno State, Early Recovery partners rehabilitated four boreholes and one manual hand-pump benefiting approximately 1,500 people. In addition, partners are drilling a new borehole at the Hussara Health Centre, which will benefit 2,500 people. Construction of new incinerators at the Yimir Ali and Chul Primary Health Centres is ongoing. Furthermore, sector partners rehabilitated 22 boreholes in Geidam and Yunusari LGAs in Yobe State, to increase water supply for domestic use and agricultural production.    

In Maiduguri, Borno State, partners continued to carry out waste management activities. A total of 3,312 people (2,578 men and 734 women) were employed through cash-for-work and cleaned up waste in 23 community areas across 10 wards.

In March and April, Sector partners trained crisis-affected people on vocational and business skills to increase their livelihood opportunities in MMC, Bama, Ngala and Damasak LGAs of Borno State. A total of 390 people received training in various skills such as carpentry, tailoring, shoe-making, micro-business, pasta making, baking and extracting groundnut oil.

Around 1,050 people completed enterprise skills and apprenticeship trainings with community-based master craftsmen across eight LGAs of Borno and Adamawa states. A total of 250 youth received start-up grants of 60,000 Naira each (first tranche and second tranche) in five LGAs in Borno State. In Adamawa State, 250 people received start-up grants of 30,000 each (first tranche) across three LGAs.

In Yobe State, 100 people received small businesses and livestock apprenticeship training, while partners also raised awareness on preventing the spread of COVID-19. In Damaturu, the capital of Yobe State, vocational training such as tailoring, fashion and design, building and interlocking, and cosmetology is ongoing for 30 trainees. The trainees will also undergo a competency test, financial literacy and business development trainings, after which they will receive business start-up kits.

In Jere and MMC LGAs, Borno State, partners trained 92 youth on employability and life skills including work place preparedness, professional and personal development, and job application processes.  Partners are also currently providing technical training support to 125 youth on business and entrepreneurship skills.

Gaps

COVID-19 posed a serious challenge to implementing resilience and recovery activities across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe states due to government-imposed travel restrictions. The presence of Sector partners has been limited to a few essential staff, with many staff working from home, reducing supervision and monitoring of activities.

In addition, the security situation continued to be fragile. Incidents of attacks by non-state armed groups were reported in Nanam, the headquarters of Yunusari LGA in Yobe State. Threats of a looming attack in Yunusari and Geidam LGAs (Yobe State) also led to a two-day suspension of activities there.

The Early Recovery Sector will continue providing technical support to partners to implement recovery and resilience activities throughout the COVID-19 pandemic. Sector partners will apply preparedness and response plans to deliver messaging and raise awareness of the coronavirus pandemic to mitigate the spread of COVID-19. These measures will help efforts to continue non-COVID-19 interventions such as cash-for-work; unconditional cash distributions; support for the establishment of small businesses; vocational and business management trainings; livelihood support and economic recovery; and rehabilitating basic infrastructure. These activities will also contribute to curbing the spread of the virus, especially by ensuring the provision of enough water, soap and other critical WASH infrastructure.

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Situation Report
Analysis

Adamawa State Humanitarian Situation Overview

Adamawa State continues to experience increased humanitarian needs driven by conflict, attacks by non-state armed groups (NSAGs), and inter-communal clashes. Insecurity continues to pervade the state with a series of armed attacks in communities around the fringes of the Sambisa forest by NSAGs. The growing insecurity continues to hamper access to vulnerable returnees in Michika, Madagali, and now some parts of Gombi Local Government Area that require much needed relief and recovery assistance.

Read the full report here.

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Media

Yassine Gaba, Deputy Humanitarian Coordinator in Nigeria visited Muna Garage camp for internally displaced persons on 28 May 2020 to show solidarity with thousands of vulnerable people affected by a recent fire outbreak.

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Situation Report
Visual

North-East Nigeria Humanitarian Snapshot

North-East Nigeria Humanitarian Snapshot

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