Philippines

Situation Report

Highlights

  • Tropical Storm Megi/Agaton struck in April 2022 across many of the same areas affected by TY Rai/Odette, causing floods and landslides.
  • Health human resources are overstretched due to competing priorities, including controlling the spread of COVID-19. Dengue cases are also rising in both Southern Leyte and Caraga.
  • Food remains to be the need of families living within evacuation centers. Support on food and nutrition of IDPs reportedly declined as efforts transition towards early recovery.
  • OCHA is preparing a handover/exit strategy to ensure coordination of continuing response beyond the lifespan of the Humanitarian Needs and Priorities (HNP) plan ending 30 June.
  • As of May, the humanitarian response under the HNP is 46 per cent funded. Nevertheless, funding remains a key constraint as communities transition to early recovery.
Typhoon Rai (Odette) Revised Humanitarian Needs and Priorities

URL:

Downloaded:

Philippines

Situation Report

Key Figures

6.8K
Total Displaced Population (Typhoon Rai)

URL:

Downloaded:

Philippines

Situation Report

Funding

$168.9M
Required
$61.5M
Received
36%
Progress
FTS

URL:

Downloaded:

Contacts

Manja Vidic

Head of OCHA Philippines

Philippines

Situation Report
Visual

Super Typhoon Rai: Six Months After (16 June 2022)

Super Typhoon Rai: Six Months After (16 June 2022)

Six months ago, on 16 December 2021, Typhoon Rai (locally known as Odette) swept through 11 of the country’s 17 regions, leaving a trail of destruction in its wake, affecting close to 12 million people and leaving 2.4 million people in need of assistance.

On 24 December 2021, the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) in the Philippines launched the Humanitarian Needs and Priorities (HNP) plan to coordinate the response.

On 2 February, the HCT launched a revised HNP. The HNP which called for US$169 million is currently 45.6 per cent funded. The generous support of donors allowed the UN and over 260 humanitarian partners to address urgent humanitarian needs and implement early recovery programmes through more than 14,600 multi-sectoral activities across 18 clusters. Funding is still needed especially to support midto long-term recovery activities.

In support of the Government-led response, humanitarians have provided more than a million people with assistance, six month since Typhoon Rai made landfall. While the HNP will end on 30 June 2022, several humanitarian agencies are implementing projects which will carry on into the second half of the year.

Although most of the displaced population have returned, development should be integrated into response and recovery efforts to provide sustainable and long-term solutions for affected communities, including education, economic, and livelihoods support.

Beyond the HNP, continued support for the affected communities is needed to ensure response and recovery progress made in the past six months is not rolled back, as the Philippines enters the peak of typhoon season and after PAGASA declared the start of rainy season in May.

Long-term and sustained recovery must consider measures to bolster preparedness and build resilience against future shocks. Humanitarian partners continue to work closely with local authorities to ensure a sustainable transition while also piloting new approaches such as anticipatory action.

URL:

Downloaded:

Philippines

Situation Report
Emergency Response
CERF Mid-Term Review - Super Typhoon Rai (Odette) Caraga and Southern Leyte, March 2022

CERF Mid-Term Review: Super Typhoon Rai (Odette) Caraga and Southern Leyte, March 2022

Making its first landfall in the afternoon of 16 December 2021, Super Typhoon Rai, locally known as Odette, pummeled coastal communities across 11 out of 17 regions of the Philippines. More than three months since, the impact of Super Typhoon Rai is spread across several islands with diverse geographic characteristics and limited resilience. After nine landfalls, the typhoon damaged over 2.1 million houses destroying 426,000 altogether, affected 533,000 farmers and fishermen by destroying hundreds of thousands of acres of coconut trees and crops, and damaging 8,000 fishing boats.

Within a few days, on 24 December, the UN Central Emergency Relief Fund (CERF) allocated US$12 million of humanitarian funds to provide life-saving humanitarian assistance to the most affected people in the provinces of Surigao Del Norte, Dinagat Islands, and Southern Leyte. CERF is one of the fastest and most effective ways to ensure that urgently needed humanitarian assistance reaches people caught up in crises. With OCHA providing coordination support, the funding channeled through IOM, UNICEF, UNFPA and WFP allowed the UN and the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT) to kick-start relief efforts immediately in a coordinated manner, alongside local actors such as the government and civil society organizations.

[MORE]

URL:

Downloaded:

Philippines

Situation Report
Emergency Response

Super Typhoon Rai (Odette) - Situation Report No. 9 (As of 26 May 2022)

More than 6,800 people remain displaced across the typhoon affected areas five months after Super Typhoon Rai’s landfall last 16 December 2021. Over 2.1 million houses were damaged of which 425,000 were destroyed and 1,702,428 were partially damaged, according to the latest government reports. The international community has mobilized much needed support Typhoon Rai relief operations totaling $77 million– or 45.6 percent of total funding requirements under the Humanitarian Needs and Priorities (HNP) plan. The additional funding will mainly go to initiatives supporting shelter, livelihood for farmers and fisherfolks, and protection. Humanitarian agencies have implemented over 14,800 multisectoral interventions to support the government’s response.

The Post Disaster Needs Assessment results in all 6 regions and its corresponding recovery plans have yet to be presented to the NDRRMC. The presentation and approval of the recovery plan will unlock government resources for full blown recovery and rehabilitation of Rai-affected regions and communities, which was hampered by the elections as well as rising prices of fuel, steel and cement due to the Ukraine crisis.

Following the April Protection and Shelter Clusters meeting with the Department of Human Settlement and Urban Development (DHSUD) to discuss the HCT Advisory on the No-Build-Zone policy in the areas impacted by Typhoon Rai, both clusters continue to advocate at the national, provincial and local level. An advocacy campaign and resource mobilization efforts were initiated by the Shelter Cluster in partnership with the provincial government of Southern Leyte.

Tropical Storm Megi/Agaton that struck in early April 2022, across many of the same areas affected by TY Rai/Odette, caused floods and landslides. More than 2,260,000 people were affected, particularly in Leyte province. According to DSWD reports as of 18 May, 3,141 families (11,319 individuals) are still displaced with 8,625 individuals staying in 69 evacuation centers in Regions V, VII, VIII, IX, X, and XII. 32,920 houses were damaged, of which, 2,477 are totally damaged and 30,443 are partially damaged.

The national and local election in typhoon-affected areas were largely peaceful. In the pre-election period, most of the humanitarian activities were on hold due to the election ban, but they have now largely resumed. The election outcomes will bring several changes in leadership of governors, mayors, local government line agencies, including provincial and municipal offices that bear mandates over the different clusters.

[MORE]

URL:

Downloaded:

Philippines

Situation Report
Coordination

Palaweños helping Palaweños: Localisation of aid driving more sustainable humanitarian outcomes in Palawan

Local actors have played a critical role as first responders, with their long-standing presence in the community and providers of long-term support. In the aftermath of Super Typhoon Rai/Odette in December 2021, local non-government organizations (NGOs) in Palawan came together with an emergency grant from the UN Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator to provide timely, immediate life-saving support and to assist localized coordination efforts. As a result, the exercise brought together local actors from NGOs and the government towards a unified, collaborative humanitarian response that helped over 1,500 affected families in Palawan.

[MORE]

URL:

Downloaded:

Philippines

Situation Report
Visual

Typhoon Rai (Odette) Who-What-Where (3W) Snapshot (As of 06 May 2022)

Typhoon Rai (Odette) Who-What-Where (3W) Snapshot (As of 06 May 2022)

URL:

Downloaded:

Philippines

Situation Report
Visual

Typhoon Rai (Odette) HNP Monitoring Indicators Dashboard (As of 04 May 2022)

Typhoon Rai (Odette) HNP Monitoring Indicators Dashboard (As of 04 May 2022)

URL:

Downloaded:

Philippines

Situation Report
Feature
Typhoon Rai (Odette) Revised Humanitarian Needs and Priorities

Typhoon Rai (Odette) Revised Humanitarian Needs and Priorities

The Humanitarian Country Team launched the revised Humanitarian Needs and Priorities Plan for Typhoon Rai/Odette. The revised HNP reflects our new understanding of the scale and extent of the damage wrought by the typhoon, which severely affected almost 10 million people.

The revised HNP targets 840,000 people, up from 530,000 in the original HNP, and calls for $169 million/ PHP 8.6 billion to meet these needs, complementing extensive Government-led efforts.

The Government has launched a massive, rapid response. But the scale of needs means seven weeks after the typhoon, nearly 144,000 people remain displaced; and 1.7 million houses, 16,000 schools and 330 health clinics have been damaged or destroyed. Over 10 million hectares of crops were affected and 80 municipalities are still experiencing power outages or disruptions.

The typhoon hit the Philippines following two years of the COVID-19 pandemic which had already heightened the vulnerability of many communities.

The revised HNP will address needs in Caraga and Southern Leyte as well as in two additional areas of Region VII: Bohol and Cebu.  The top response priorities for the six-months plan are shelter, food security and agriculture, water sanitation and hygiene (WASH), protection and early recovery. Support for education is also prominent. 

URL:

Downloaded:

Philippines

Situation Report
Feature
Header photo

Odette six months on: Photo exhibition

Overview

Making its first landfall in the afternoon of 16 December 2021, Typhoon Rai, locally known as Odette, brought torrential rains, violent winds, mudslides, floods and storm surges to central-southern Philippines, specifically the Visayas and Mindanao Islands, with maximum sustained winds of 195km/h and gustiness of 260km/h. Typhoon Rai rapidly intensified from a Category 2 typhoon to a Category 5 in less than 12 hours before landfall, and 16 million of people were affected and 2.4 million people were in need of assistance.

It has been over 100 days since Typhoon Rai pummeled coastal communities across 11 out of 17 regions of the Philippines. The typhoon damaged over 2 million houses destroying 424,000 altogether, affected 533,000 farmers and fisherfolk by destroying hundreds of thousands of acres of coconut trees and crops, and damaging 8,000 fishing boats.

In support of the government-led response, the Philippines Humanitarian Country Team developed a Humanitarian Needs and Priorities Plan to meet the needs of the affected population in CARAGA, Southern Leyte, Bohol, Cebu and with specific Cash Voucher Assistance (CVA) component in Palawan. Response and recovery efforts are ongoing.

The entire humanitarian community has made great efforts to meet the needs of the most vulnerable people. As recently stated by the Government, the response phase is now over, and the early recovery phase has begun. Some of the response activities will continue until the end of June with the aim of addressing residual needs and ensuring a smooth transition and sustainable solutions.

Several challenges and best practices have been identified. However, it is necessary to continue strengthening the humanitarian model through advocacy, participation and localization of our actions. Climate change increases the risk in the country, accentuating the levels of vulnerability to the continuous occurrence of disasters, such as the recent impact of Tropical Storm Agaton in the areas recently affected by Typhoon Odette.

For the development of resilient communities, it is necessary to generate a risk culture with the awareness and participation of all stakeholders. Art as a form of expression is a means of communicating to the general public how and why humanitarian actors and development agencies do what we do.

Objective

Organize a photography exhibition covering the six months of the typhoon’s impact, highlights the whole-of-society humanitarian response, and features the stories of affected people getting on with rebuilding their lives.

Support the nexus between humanitarian action and early recovery as part of development, increasing the visibility, accountability of all response interventions of humanitarian partners in support of the Government, as well as mobilizing resources for the challenges already identified to ensure sustainability in our actions.

Expected outcomes

  • Commemorate the humanitarian community's six months of support to the government in the areas affected by Typhoon Odette, as part of the activities linked to theWorld Humanitarian Day.

  • Promote accountability for the response actions taken by humanitarian actors to the Odette response.

  • Promote awareness among the population about the risk and impact of typhoons in the country.

  • Providing accountability in an innovative way that helps to bring the work of the humanitarian community closer to the general population.

  • Mobilize resources from the international community to strengthen the nexus and sustainable actions for the most vulnerable people. 

Venue

The photo exhibition is hosted by the Spanish Embassy, the Cervantes Institute and AECID and coordinated by OCHA on behalf of the Resident Coordinator and Humanitarian Coordinator (RC/HC) and theHumanitarian Country Team (HCT). 

It will take place at the Cervantes Institute “La Casa Azul” in Intramuros(Plaza Sans Luis complex, General Luna St, Intramuros).

The premiere will take place on 12 July (Odette's six-months on), and the exhibition will be open to the public until 19 August (World Humanitarian Day).

Open call for submissions for the photo exhibition

From 30 May to 10 June COB will be open the deadline for sending photos. The following are invited to participate:

  • Local NGOs, CSOs, INGOs, UN agencies, Private Sector involved in the response. 

  • Photos that are not submitted through an organization will be excluded from the selection process.

Photo selection methodology

The photo exhibition seeks to show the trace of the typhoon’s impact to the current situation, six months later, with the achievements and challenges that the affected areas and communities face.

The photo exhibition seeks to show the trace of the typhoon’s impact to the current situation, six months later, with the achievements and challenges that the affected areas and communities face.

The exhibition will showcase 4 moments, or categories composed of 3 subcategories aligned with the 2030 Agenda (social, economic, environmental):

  1. Aftermath of the typhoon

  2. The humanitarian response (first response)

  3. Impact of the humanitarian response (6 months on - nexus)

  4. Challenges and gaps that remain among affected communities

Each organization/agency may upload a maximum of twelve (12) photos only - 3 photos per category representing social, economic and environmental areas.

Technical information
  • Photos must be in color and can be shot using any mobile device or camera.

  • Photo manipulation to add or remove content is not permitted. However, cropping photos is allowed.

  • Photos should not contain watermarks, any identifying marks, or additional texts.

  • The longest side of the photo must be at least 1000 px and preferably 300dpi.Photos must be submitted in JPEG or similar image file types. Participants are encouraged to submit photos in the highest resolution possible (the Google Form accepts image files with a size limit of 100 MB per upload).

  • Photo filename must include [Organization name]_[Category number]_[Photo number]

  • Photos must include a photo caption and information about the photographer (name and home/commissioning organization). The photo caption must be in English and should contain: (a) description of who is in the photo and what is happening within the photo; (b) location information of where the photo was taken; and (c) description why the photo is significant, which may include a quote, name, and backstory from the subjects in the photo.

  • Organizations attest to have consent of photo subjects clearly depicted in the photos submitted.

Platform for photo submission

The Google Form platform will be used to submit the photo(s). Find the access link below:

Odette six months on: open call for submissions

A Google Mail account is required to log in. In case you do not have one, we ask that you manually fill out Annex 1 with the specific information for each photo, and send the information by email to Almudena Montoliú (almudena.montoliu@un.org) and Althea Gonzales (althea.gonzales@un.org).

Photo selection

An impartial panel will review all photos based on the above categories and criteria (relevance to the chosen category, creativity and uniqueness, visual quality, overall impact).

A maximum of 48 photos will be selected for the exhibition. Prints will be made in two sizes, in order to facilitate maximum printing quality. Once the selection process has been completed, we will contact organizations whose submissions were selected.

URL:

Downloaded: