South Sudan

Situation Report

Highlights (4 days ago)

  • Almost 7 million people facing critical lack of food
  • South Sudan appeals for $12 million to prevent Ebola
  • Lack of water displaces thousands of people to Mogos, Kapoeta East, Eastern Equatoria
  • Increased food pre-positioning as the rainy season starts
IOM trains eight volunteers on Ebola transmission, signs and symptoms in preparation for the opening of the point of entry screening site in Lasu, Yei County. Credit: IOM
IOM trains eight volunteers on Ebola transmission, signs and symptoms in preparation for the opening of the point of entry screening site in Lasu, Yei County. Credit: IOM

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South Sudan

Situation Report

Key Figures

7.2M
People in need
5.7M
People targeted
1.9M
Number of IDPs
6.96M
Severely food insecure (May-Jul)

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South Sudan

Situation Report

Funding (2019)

$1.5B
Requirements
$575.1M
Funding
38%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Stephen O'Malley

Head of Office

Emmi Antinoja

Head of Communications and Information Management

South Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis (4 days ago)
IPC acute food insecurity (May-July)
IPC acute food insecurity (May-July)

Almost 7 million people facing critical lack of food

The number of people likely to face acute food insecurity in South Sudan by the end of July has risen to the highest level yet, with an estimated 6.96 million people – 61 per cent of the South Sudanese population – affected, UN agencies have warned.

According to the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC), by the end of July, 21,000 people will face a catastrophic lack of food access.   

Another 1.82 million people will be a step away from catastrophic food insecurity. Further, over 5 million people will face Crisis levels of food insecurity.

About 81,000 more people than originally estimated in a January forecast for May to July are facing Crisis levels of food insecurity or worse, particularly in Jonglei, Lakes, Unity and Northern Bahr el Ghazal.

Poor harvest in 2018 meant that the lean season – when people do not have enough food stocks to eat – started earlier this year. Delayed seasonal rains, that came in late May, compounded the situation. South Sudan’s harvest is largely dependent on rains.

Persistent economic instability, the impacts of previous years of conflict, and related asset depletion and population displacements have added to the disruption of livelihoods and reduced people's access to food.

“This update to the IPC reveals that much more work needs to be done. The recovery of food production and increased yields in South Sudan are reliant on the maintenance of peace, and must be given a chance,” said Meshack Malo, the Food and Agriculture Organization’s Representative in South Sudan.

“With greater stability in the country, access to those in need has improved, allowing us to treat more than 100,000 children suffering from severe malnutrition in the first five months of the year, with more than 90 per cent of those children recovering,” said Mohamed Ag Ayoya, UNICEF’s Representative in South Sudan. “But malnutrition levels remain critical in many areas and our fear is that the situation could worsen in the coming months.”

“The hunger season coincides with the rainy season and that’s a perfect storm in South Sudan,” said Ronald Sibanda, WFP’s Country Director in South Sudan. “As we ramp up our response, the race is now against time and nature – we must act now to save the lives and livelihoods of the millions on the brink of starvation.”

The three UN agencies called for effective implementation of the late-2018 revitalized peace agreement to allow scaled-up humanitarian assistance and to boost agricultural production across the country.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Feature (6 days ago)
Aid workers at a newly opened Ebola screening site in Bori border entry point, Kajo-Keji County. Credit: IOM
Aid workers at a newly opened Ebola screening site in Bori border entry point, Kajo-Keji County. Credit: IOM

South Sudan appeals for $12 million to prevent Ebola

On 13 June, the Ministry of Health together with the United Nations and its partners launched an updated Ebola Virus Disease preparedness plan to prevent the disease spreading from neighbouring countries and prepare for a possible outbreak in the country. The plan requires $12.2 million and will be implemented between April and September 2019.

The launch occurred only two days after the first Ebola case was confirmed in neighbouring Uganda, and more cases have been confirmed since. In the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the number of cases has surpassed 2,000. The World Health Organization has assessed the risk of the disease spreading to South Sudan as ‘very high.’

Prioritized activities in the plan include improving the existing surveillance system with a greater focus on community-based surveillance, scaling up training for front-line health workers, increasing the number of isolation units, and expanding risk communication and community mobilization. In addition, a 72-hour outbreak response and containment plan and vaccine readiness strategy will be put in place.

“The cases in Uganda were detected early, thanks to the preparedness measures in place. [This] sends the message that investing in prevention and preparedness is not only the right thing to do, it is the smart thing to do,” said acting Humanitarian Coordinator for the United Nations in South Sudan, Dr. Olushayo Olu. “The cost of a fully-fledged outbreak is staggering compared to prevention, and would include immense human suffering, long-term economic damage, and further depletion of an already weak healthcare system. We cannot allow it to happen.”

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis (12 days ago)
Displaced people in Mogos by sex
Displaced people in Mogos by sex

Lack of water displaces thousands of people to Mogos, Kapoeta East, Eastern Equatoria

Humanitarian organizations report that up to 5,700 people have been displaced from Lopeat and Kassengor to Mogos, in Kapoeta East County, due to a chronic lack of water and other basic services.

The people, mainly women and children, are said to be living in makeshift shelters under trees.

"We ran to this place because of lack of water in our village. Children are drinking and washing with dirty water. Many children have diarrhoea and coughs and there are no medicines," said one woman in Mogos.

In addition to water and health services, the people’s main needs are food, emergency shelter and essential household supplies.

Kapoeta East is projected to be facing ‘emergency’ food insecurity (Integrated Food Security Phase Classification Phase 4) in the May-July period, even in the presence of humanitarian food assistance.

Humanitarian organizations plan to increase response in the area. A key priority is to ensure the population has access to safe water by distributing water purification materials and water containers, and repairing hand pumps.

Prior to the displacement, more than 4,500 people out of the 5,700 displaced people received a 15-day food assistance ration in Lopeat and Kassengor. Food distribution to the same people will continue until July. Health care and nutrition services, including screening and treatment of severe and moderate acute malnutrition, are ongoing.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Feature (23 days ago)
WFP trucks on the road in Bentiu, Unity, in April 2019. Credit: WFP
WFP trucks on the road in Bentiu, Unity, in April 2019. Credit: WFP

Increased food pre-positioning as the rainy season starts

Humanitarian organizations have scaled-up pre-positioning of supplies across South Sudan before rains intensify and roads become impassable. Nearly 60 per cent of the country will become inaccessible over the coming five months, and the concluding dry season offers a critical window to pre-position essential relief items.

From January to May 2019, the World Food Programme (WFP) pre-positioned almost 172,000 metric tons in 60 different locations across South Sudan. This is 98 per cent of the 175,000 metric ton target, and 60,000 metric tons more than in the same period last year.

WFP has also expanded the storage capacity in hard-to-reach areas. At least 54 mobile storage units have been deployed in Unity and Jonglei, increasing current storage capacity by 25,000 metric tons.

As the planting season intensifies, organizations working on food security and livelihoods have also accelerated their efforts to get vital seeds, agricultural tools and other materials to some of the most vulnerable communities across the country.

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Media (81 days ago)

We asked people who fled their homes because of the conflict in South Sudan to tell us about their lives. Watch this video, and hear what they said.