South Sudan

Situation Report

Highlights (2 days ago)

  • Lack of water displaces thousands of people to Mogos, Kapoeta East, Eastern Equatoria
  • Increased food pre-positioning as the rainy season starts
  • Humanitarian needs assessed in Maridi, Western Equatoria
  • More than 20,000 people displaced in Jur River County
  • Almost half of displaced people intend to leave Malakal Protection of Civilians site
A teacher holds a broken blackboard in Nabanga primary school, Maridi County. Many primary schools across the County were looted and destroyed during the years of conflict. May 2019. Credit: OCHA
A teacher holds a broken blackboard in Nabanga primary school, Maridi County. Many primary schools across the County were looted and destroyed during the years of conflict. May 2019. Credit: OCHA

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South Sudan

Situation Report

Key Figures

7.2M
People in need
5.7M
People targeted
1.9M
Number of IDPs
6.87M
Severely food insecure (May-Jul)

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South Sudan

Situation Report

Funding (2019)

$1.5B
Requirements
$467.7M
Funding
31%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Stephen O'Malley

Head of Office

Emmi Antinoja

Head of Communications and Information Management

South Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis (1 day ago)
Displaced people in Mogos by sex
Displaced people in Mogos by sex

Lack of water displaces thousands of people to Mogos, Kapoeta East, Eastern Equatoria

Humanitarian organizations report that up to 5,700 people have been displaced from Lopeat and Kassengor to Mogos, in Kapoeta East County, due to a chronic lack of water and other basic services.

The people, mainly women and children, are said to be living in makeshift shelters under trees.

"We ran to this place because of lack of water in our village. Children are drinking and washing with dirty water. Many children have diarrhoea and coughs and there are no medicines," said one woman in Mogos.

In addition to water and health services, the people’s main needs are food, emergency shelter and essential household supplies.

Kapoeta East is projected to be facing ‘emergency’ food insecurity (Integrated Food Security Phase Classification Phase 4) in the May-July period, even in the presence of humanitarian food assistance.

Humanitarian organizations plan to increase response in the area. A key priority is to ensure the population has access to safe water by distributing water purification materials and water containers, and repairing hand pumps.

Prior to the displacement, more than 4,500 people out of the 5,700 displaced people received a 15-day food assistance ration in Lopeat and Kassengor. Food distribution to the same people will continue until July. Health care and nutrition services, including screening and treatment of severe and moderate acute malnutrition, are ongoing.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Feature (12 days ago)
WFP trucks on the road in Bentiu, Unity, in April 2019. Credit: WFP
WFP trucks on the road in Bentiu, Unity, in April 2019. Credit: WFP

Increased food pre-positioning as the rainy season starts

Humanitarian organizations have scaled-up pre-positioning of supplies across South Sudan before rains intensify and roads become impassable. Nearly 60 per cent of the country will become inaccessible over the coming five months, and the concluding dry season offers a critical window to pre-position essential relief items.

From January to May 2019, the World Food Programme (WFP) pre-positioned almost 172,000 metric tons in 60 different locations across South Sudan. This is 98 per cent of the 175,000 metric ton target, and 60,000 metric tons more than in the same period last year.

WFP has also expanded the storage capacity in hard-to-reach areas. At least 54 mobile storage units have been deployed in Unity and Jonglei, increasing current storage capacity by 25,000 metric tons.

As the planting season intensifies, organizations working on food security and livelihoods have also accelerated their efforts to get vital seeds, agricultural tools and other materials to some of the most vulnerable communities across the country.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis (2 days ago)
A destroyed primary school in Nabanga village, May 2019. Credit: OCHA
A destroyed primary school in Nabanga village, May 2019. Credit: OCHA

Humanitarian needs assessed in Maridi, Western Equatoria

From 24 April to 7 May, aid agencies conducted a mission to assess the humanitarian situation across Maridi County, as displaced people started returning to their homes. The assessment found that most public facilities, including schools, health facilities, churches, markets and community centres, were looted and destroyed during the years of conflict, which has prevented some people from returning.

However, when spoken to, the people who had returned to their homes intended to stay permanently, despite the humanitarian difficulties that they faced.

Among the returning and displaced people, and the communities in which they lived, the assessment mission found that:

  • Women and children have been the most affected by the crisis. Gender-based violence cases, as well as cases of child recruitment abduction into the armed groups, have been common. 

  • In some of the villages, schools were damaged, there was limited or no teaching, and learning materials for children were non-existent. Children were seen learning under trees and some were walking up to 7 kilometres daily to access education.

  • Returning people had consumed most of their food stocks and relied on borrowed food from friends and relatives. Other coping mechanisms for communities included collection of wild food, reduced number and size of meals, and restricted food consumption by adults to enable children to have one meal a day.

  • Most health facilities were dilapidated and vandalized. The number of health workers was very limited: in most facilities visited, one health worker managed the whole facility. In addition, there were acute shortages of medicines in all the health facilities visited.

  • Access to clean water was a serious concern. Nearly all boreholes in the areas assessed were non-functional, and communities got water from unsafe sources.

  • Some of the areas visited were highly contaminated with unexploded ordinance.

The priority humanitarian needs of the people were food; farming seeds and tools; repair of boreholes; training of hygiene promoters and community pump mechanics; distribution of school supplies and the construction of learning spaces; nutrition support to new mothers and pregnant women; and a collective, sector-wide effort to confront gender-based violence.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Emergency Response (23 days ago)
Jur River County
Jur River County

More than 20,000 people displaced in Jur River County

Inter-communal violence has displaced more than 20,000 people since early March and has prevented thousands of civilians from returning to their homes in Kuajiena and Roc-Rocdong, Jur River County.   

Since early March, cattle keepers from Tonj have come to Jur River searching for pasture for their livestock. Their attacks on villages in the area have led to reports of killing, rape, beating, and looting. People said they fear to return because of more attacks.

In Kuajiena, nearly 4,000 displaced people are currently sheltering at a primary school and in abandoned public buildings in the town.

In Roc-Rocdong, humanitarians have reported that nearly 8,000 people, mainly women and children have been displaced in Marial Bai and other neighbouring areas. At least 200 people, mostly women and unaccompanied children, are sheltering in a church compound and a primary school in Roc-Rocdong town.

Since March, nearly 4,500 newly displaced people in Wau PoC site and about 3,000 displaced people in Agok and Hai Masna collective sites have been reported.

The displaced people have called on the Government to provide security so that they can return home. But attacks continue to be reported in some of the villages, even after the deployment of Government forces to the area.

Humanitarian activities are ongoing to respond to urgent needs: safe water, food, emergency items and emergency shelter, primarily. In April, in Kuajiena, 4,200 people received 15-day food rations, and nutrition supplies to 900 children aged under 5 years were distributed. In Marial Bai and neighbouring settlements, over 7,000 people received a 15-day food ration.

Humanitarian organizations continue to engage with the political leaders in Tonj and Wau states to provide security for the displaced people to return to their villages.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis (29 days ago)
Malakal Protection of Civilians site population by age and sex as of April 2019
Malakal Protection of Civilians site population by age and sex as of April 2019

Almost half of displaced people intend to leave Malakal Protection of Civilians site

In April, IOM and UNHCR conducted a survey in the Malakal Protection of Civilians (PoC) site to establish displaced people’s intentions to return to their places of origin. The joint survey found that 44 per cent of displaced households intended to leave; one third of them within the next three months.

The main reasons for choosing to leave were improvements in security, better access to humanitarian services, and better economic and livelihood opportunities. Other factors influencing decisions were cultural ties, family reunification and access to housing.

Of those intending to leave, some 43 per cent indicated owning land or a house where they will seek shelter and 37 per cent intended to stay with friends or family. Some 14 per cent intend to seek accommodation provided by humanitarian service providers, and others indicated renting or relying on the local community for shelter.

Most people intended to return or relocate to areas within Malakal town, where land and property rights remain a key concern. Many people have lost documents to prove their land and property ownership during the conflict.

Yet, many people did not feel safe returning to their homes because of the destruction during the conflict, illegal occupation of their properties and a high presence of soldiers in some areas.

One Shilluk woman in the PoC site said: “I would love to go back to my village but currently things are not like before the crisis at my home area. My shelter was destroyed. For now, I will see how the peace develops before making a final decision of going back.”

Prior to the 2013 conflict, Malakal town was considered the second largest city in country with an estimated population of about 126,000 people according to the results of 2008 census. The conflict forced most of the town’s population to flee with some seeking shelter in the UNMISS PoC in Malakal town.

The Malakal PoC site population peaked at just under 48,000 individuals in August 2015 and has since dropped to some 29,190 people as per the population head count conducted by humanitarians at the end of April. Nearly 52 per cent of the people currently sheltering in the PoC site are women who face risks of violence daily. Women and girls who must leave the camp in search of firewood are particularly at risk.

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Media (70 days ago)

We asked people who fled their homes because of the conflict in South Sudan to tell us about their lives. Watch this video, and hear what they said.