South Sudan

Situation Report

Highlights (10 days ago)

  • The 19 August is World Humanitarian Day – this year it honours Women Humanitarians
  • Fighting triggers new displacement in Maiwut, Upper Nile
  • 22,000 internally displaced people from Wau PoC site returned to Wau town and other locations since 2018
  • Malaria cases increased as rainy season intensified across South Sudan
  • High-level delegation led by the Humanitarian Coordinator visits Yei to see Ebola preparedness and response efforts
The 19 August is World Humanitarian Day. This year it focuses on Women Humanitarians, like Rose Tawil, a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Officer at UNICEF. Credit: UNICEF
The 19 August is World Humanitarian Day. This year it focuses on Women Humanitarians, like Rose Tawil, a Water, Sanitation and Hygiene Officer at UNICEF. Credit: UNICEF

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South Sudan

Situation Report

Key Figures

7.2M
People in need
5.7M
People targeted
1.9M
Internally displaced people
6.96M
Severely food insecure (May-Jul)

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South Sudan

Situation Report

Funding (2019)

$1.5B
Required
$676.6M
Received
45%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Stephen O'Malley

Head of Office

Emmi Antinoja

Head of Communications and Information Management

South Sudan

Situation Report
Feature (10 days ago)
Jesca Wude Murye, a Nutrition Officer with UNICEF, said: "Being a humanitarian worker is not something that everyone can do. It takes a special type of person. People who have compassion, love, and are willing to sacrifice their time." Credit: UNICEF
Jesca Wude Murye, a Nutrition Officer with UNICEF, said: "Being a humanitarian worker is not something that everyone can do. It takes a special type of person. People who have compassion, love, and are willing to sacrifice their time." Credit: UNICEF

The 19 August is World Humanitarian Day – this year it honours Women Humanitarians

World Humanitarian Day (WHD) on 19 August, is an annual occasion to commemorate humanitarian workers who have been killed or attacked in the course of their work, and to honour those who continue to take risks every day to provide life-saving aid to those who need it. This year the contribution of women humanitarians throughout the world, their strength, power and perseverance, are being honoured.

In South Sudan there are just over 40 national women-led organizations, out of 214 national NGOs. That’s less than a fifth. But it is women – from national and international NGOs – that play a central role in the survival and resilience of families and communities. In South Sudan, they are active in every aspect of humanitarian response, from the delivery of emergency supplies to providing assistance for gender-based violence; and across every sector, from food and shelter to educational support. 

There are many communities where women humanitarians can access people, and provide vital information, support and services, to women and girls who may otherwise be out of reach. 

In South Sudan, women humanitarians face a variety of obstacles in doing their work because of their gender, from risks to their personal safety, to sexism, discrimination and sexual harassment. More needs to be done to address these issues.

There are many women humanitarians in South Sudan, and every single one of them is being honoured. 

For this WHD, OCHA asked women humanitarians what being a humanitarian was like. Jesca Wude Murye is a Nutrition Officer working for UNICEF, based in Juba. She lives in Hai Cinema. She is a mother of four, including twins. Here is her answer:

Being a humanitarian worker is not something that everyone can do. It takes a special type of person. People who have compassion, love, and are willing to sacrifice their time, and take time to give a smile to someone else. In my case giving a smile to a mother who has lost hope and whose child is malnourished and bringing that child back to life is my joy. I enjoy working as a humanitarian because it is life-saving and I can see the results of what I do.

“I love going to the field to interact with children and mothers. Putting a smile on the face of a child and mother. But security is the most challenging part - conducting humanitarian activities under a tense political environment coupled with the lack of access to the most vulnerable people due to poor road infrastructure.”

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Feature (10 days ago)
Maiwut County map showing hotspots and displacement. Source: OCHA
Maiwut County map showing hotspots and displacement. Source: OCHA

Fighting triggers new displacement in Maiwut, Upper Nile

Fighting in Maiwut town and surrounding areas has forced people to flee their homes and triggered the relocation of humanitarian workers, causing suspension of the delivery of much-needed humanitarian assistance.

From 31 July to 5 August, clashes were reported between the Cie-Wau clan and opposition forces. Civilians fled to villages around Maiwut town, some of which were already flooded by heavy rains. At least 10 humanitarian workers were relocated for safety reasons.

Unconfirmed reports put the number of displaced people at 10,000. Humanitarians have said more than 25,000 people could be affected if fighting carries on. Maiwut and surrounding areas host a significant population of refugee returnees and people already displaced.

Looting of civilian properties and humanitarian compounds were reported. Local authorities are mediating with the groups, and reassured civilians that they would be safe if they returned home. Humanitarians are advocating for access to the area to allow delivery of assistance and safety for workers.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis (22 days ago)
Wau Protection of Civilians site sex and age disaggregated data
Wau Protection of Civilians site sex and age disaggregated data

22,000 internally displaced people from Wau PoC site returned to Wau town and other locations since 2018

Since the beginning of 2018, a significant number of internally displaced people have left Wau Protection of Civilians (PoC) site to return to their homes due to relatively improved security in most parts of Western Bahr el Ghazal.

On 27 July, IOM Displacement Tracking Matrix, with support from other UN agencies and UNMISS, conducted a biometric registration in Wau PoC site. The team reported that nearly 13,000 displaced people, out of around 35,000 people registered at the site in 2018, currently live there.

The result confirmed that some 22,000 people left the PoC site to Wau town and other locations, including Deim Zubeir and Raja, since the beginning of 2018.

Humanitarian organizations plan to verify and register returnees who have gone back to their places of origin and provide assistance, depending on needs and vulnerability. Health care, nutrition, water, sanitation and hygiene, education and protection, which are already available in Wau town, are among the assistance that will be provided.

The community leaders at the site said the findings will improve the provision of balanced humanitarian assistance and equitable use of resources to the IDPs and returnees in Wau County.

As of 25 July, the total number of civilians seeking safety in six PoC sites across the country was 182,026.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis (22 days ago)
Counties most affected by malaria in 2019 Source: WHO, OCHA
Counties most affected by malaria in 2019 Source: WHO, OCHA

Malaria cases increased as rainy season intensified across South Sudan

As the rainy season intensified across the country, an increase of malaria cases continued, causing high illness and death, especially among children.

In July, the World Health Organization (WHO) reported that malaria trends in at least 19 counties have exceeded the threshold of cases recorded between 2013 to 2017.

According to the WHO latest disease surveillance update, malaria accounted for nearly 68 per cent of all illnesses and 72 per cent of deaths reported in health facilities across the country in the first half of July. Most of these cases where children under the age of five.

In Duk County of Jonglei, one of the counties reported, authorities have said that they lack malaria drugs at the health facilities, and people use herbal medicines instead.

In response to the increased malaria cases humanitarian organizations are scaling-up prevention and response. This includes the distribution of mosquito nets and replenishing antimalarial drugs in health facilities across the country. However, conflict, inadequate health workers, and poor road conditions – due to heavy rains – severely impacts the availability of health care. Supply chain issues in the delivery of malaria drugs remain a key challenge.

Humanitarian organizations are working to provide critical health services to 2.1 million people targeted in the 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan, but the health response faces a 78 per cent funding gap as of 31 July.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Feature (36 days ago)
The Humanitarian Coordinator talks to people in the communities on his high-level delegation mission to Yei to see the activities underway to prepare for, and respond to, a potential EVD outbreak in South Sudan. Credit: UNMISS
The Humanitarian Coordinator talks to people in the communities on his high-level delegation mission to Yei to see the activities underway to prepare for, and respond to, a potential EVD outbreak in South Sudan. Credit: UNMISS

High-level delegation led by the Humanitarian Coordinator visits Yei to see Ebola preparedness and response efforts

On 15 July, a high-level delegation visited Yei, an area at high risk of the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), to see the activities underway to prepare for, and respond to, a potential EVD outbreak in the country, and understand the challenges around these.

The delegation included the Government, the Humanitarian Coordinator, ambassadors from donor countries, UN agencies and representatives of international NGOs.

“Diseases such as Ebola don’t respect boundaries, race or religion so all must ensure that they work together to prevent its cross-border transmission into South Sudan,” said Alain Noudéhou, the Humanitarian Coordinator for South Sudan.

“Although South Sudan has not confirmed any EVD case, implementation of effective public health measures is critical to manage the risk posed by South Sudan’s complex humanitarian context, the history of previous outbreaks, increasing global travel and proximity to DRC,” said Dr. Olushayo Olu, WHO Country Representative to South Sudan.

At a meeting with the State Governor in Yei, it was emphasized that community acceptance and ownership of preventive measures to stop the virus from spreading into South Sudan were key. Informing at-risk communities about Ebola and telling them what to do to protect themselves, and increasing public awareness by providing information through all communication channels, religious and community leaders were also emphasized. The delegation commended the efforts of the different organizations, and the representatives of the donor community reaffirmed their commitment to support the EVD preparedness efforts in the country.

Much progress has been made in preparedness for EVD in South Sudan. But insecurity, inadequate health facilities, lack of experience in managing EVD, poor communication networks, poor road conditions and uncontrolled movement of travelers across the border remain a challenge.

Operational interference has been a constant concern. In Yei in June there were significant operational interference by security officials, affecting two UN EVD teams on mission.

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Media (8 days ago)

Watch Joyce Asha Francis, an OCHA National Field Officer in Malakal, talk about being a woman humanitarian and the challenge that it brings.

Forty-six year old Joyce Asha Francis is an OCHA National Field Officer in Malakal, South Sudan’s Upper Nile Region. She was born in Uganda and lives in Kenya, but her roots are in South Sudan. She has been a humanitarian for practically all of her working life. She is a mother of five children.

OCHA asked her about what being a woman humanitarian meant to her, the good parts and the challenges. She answered:

“Being a humanitarian to me means love, compassion, kindness, generosity, being cooperative, patient, caring, helpful, humble and being culturally sensitive, in order to save lives, relieve suffering and maintain the human dignity of the affected people. Without the above listed qualities, one can hardly endure to be a humanitarian worker.

“The most favourite part of my work is around general coordination and providing leadership to ensure that basic services reach the people in need. It is fulfilling to see us humanitarian workers running around to get work done and the people talk of how the services that are there now have changed their lives.

“The most challenging parts of my work are resource mobilization and access. In an event that resources are limited and are not able to reach the affected people, I feel terrible because a life could be lost due to the inability to provide basic services, or the inability to reach people due to poor communication networks or human-imposed barricades. This hurts a lot.”

Watch this video to learn more about Joyce’s experiences coordinating humanitarian action in one of the most challenging places in the world.