South Sudan

Situation Report

Highlights (18 hours ago)

  • Ebola preparedness and response activities heighten as a case is confirmed near the South Sudan border
  • Humanitarian Fund brings change in the lives of 2.9 million people
  • More than 3,300 internally displaced people return to Baliet County, Upper Nile
  • Almost 7 million people facing critical lack of food
Displaced people in Melut boarding truck to return to their places of origin in Baliet County. Credit: IOM
Displaced people in Melut boarding truck to return to their places of origin in Baliet County. Credit: IOM

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South Sudan

Situation Report

Key Figures

7.2M
People in need
5.7M
People targeted
1.9M
Internally displaced people
6.96M
Severely food insecure (May-Jul)

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South Sudan

Situation Report

Funding (2019)

$1.5B
Required
$583.4M
Received
39%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Stephen O'Malley

Head of Office

Emmi Antinoja

Head of Communications and Information Management

South Sudan

Situation Report
Emergency Response (18 hours ago)
A health worker screening a traveler to Yei town for Ebola symptoms. Credit: IOM
A health worker screening a traveler to Yei town for Ebola symptoms. Credit: IOM

Ebola preparedness and response activities heighten as a case is confirmed near the South Sudan border

On 3 July, the Ebola Virus Disease (EVD) was confirmed in Ariwara in the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), just 70 kilometres away from the Kaya border town in South Sudan’s Yei area.

There are no confirmed cases in South Sudan, but the risk of EVD spreading to the country remains high due to its proximity to the DRC and the high number of people crossing the border between the two countries. Since the outbreak was confirmed in DRC in August 2018, more than 50 alerts have been reported in South Sudan. They have all tested negative for EVD.

“I would like to reiterate and assure the South Sudanese people and residents that there is no Ebola virus in South Sudan and that you are safe going about your business as usual, or travel into or out of the country,” said Dr. Makur Matur, the Under-Secretary in the Ministry of Health. “There is no reason to panic. However, vigilance should be maintained to prevent Ebola importation,” he added.

Following the confirmation of the case in Ariwara, a Government-led joint team from Juba travelled to Yei and Kaya to strengthen coordination and surveillance efforts in the high-risk areas of Yei and its border regions. These include the Kaya and Nimule border posts, along the busy trading routes between Aliwara in the DRC and Arua Town, a major trading hub in Uganda's West Nile Region.

Several preparedness activities have been implemented across South Sudan since the EVD outbreak was confirmed in  the DRC. More than 30 screening sites at border points of entry have been established and more than 2.5 million people have been screened as of 8 July. Four isolation units have been established. Some 2,793 frontline and health workers have been vaccinated, and 112 health facilities supported with infection prevention and control (IPC), and water, sanitation and hygiene supplies. In high risk locations, some 10,500 Personal Protective Equipment have been pre-positioned. Training has been provided to 29 Rapid Response Teams, and 300 frontline and health workers have been trained on basic IPC measures. About 1,200 key community influencers have been engaged, and six safe and dignified burial teams trained.

The Government has promised to provide unhindered access to all locations where preparedness activities are taking place, and will continue to work with humanitarian organizations to ensure preparedness efforts are fully implemented.

South Sudan suffered an Ebola outbreak in 2004 when the World Health Organization reported 20 cases, including five deaths in Yambio, bordering the DRC.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Feature (12 days ago)
Community members discuss gender-based violence as they enjoy a cup of coffee in Mundri, Western Equatoria. Credit: Active Youth Association/Achan
Community members discuss gender-based violence as they enjoy a cup of coffee in Mundri, Western Equatoria. Credit: Active Youth Association/Achan

Humanitarian Fund brings change in the lives of 2.9 million people

The South Sudan Humanitarian Fund (SSHF) made an enormous difference for 2.9 million people in 2018. About 1.3 million of them were women and girls.

A broad range of UN agencies and NGOs apply for and receive funding from the SSHF to implement projects addressing identified priority needs.

Last year the Fund supported 225 projects implemented by 87 national and international partners. This enabled humanitarian organizations to save lives through timely and multi-sector assistance, alleviating acute needs, reinforcing protection, promoting access to basic services, and supporting the capacities of at-risk communities to cope with significant threats to lives, livelihoods and well-being. Of $53.4 million allocated in 2018, 39 per cent – or $20.6 million – went to local NGOs.

Helping survivors of gender-based violence through community engagement

In 2018, the SSHF funded 19 projects aimed to help survivors of gender-based violence recover physically and psychologically from the trauma and gain access to emergency and life-saving services.

In an internal displacement camp in Mundri, Western Equatoria region, the Mundri Active Youth Association (MAYA) set up a woman and girl-friendly space, which provides support for up to 4,000 individuals. As women and girls in the camp remained exposed to risks of harassment, abuse and assault, MAYA initiated a series of information sessions to educate men and boys to what constitutes gender-based violence, why women and men should equally participate in decision-making processes, and how to prevent gender-based violence.

Thanks to funding from the SSHF, MAYA helped 48-year-old Esther, one of the displaced women living in the Mundri camp, set up a coffee shop where every Friday she organizes informal get-togethers over coffee and talks about gender issues with community members. Esther knows her community members, and her work paid off. On average, 45 people attend each session and the conversations are getting more and more participatory and engaged, especially around the safety and the integrity of women and girls.

Stopping the spread of the Ebola virus

In the wake of the Ebola Virus Disease outbreak in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and the heightened risk of its spread into South Sudan, the SSHF allocated $2 million to support the timely implementation of Ebola prevention and preparedness activities, in complementarity with bilateral funding sources and a boost from the UN’s Central Emergency Response Fund.

Looking ahead

This year, the implementation of the 2018 Revitalized Agreement on the Resolution of the Conflict offers the prospect of new opportunities to promote recovery and development for the people of South Sudan. For the time being, however, the humanitarian situation remains serious and 7.2 million people need emergency assistance.

The SSHF will continue to support the implementation of frontline services to address the humanitarian consequences of years of conflict, violence and destroyed livelihoods.

This requires sustained support from donors. Last year, the SSHF received US$ 88.9 million from 13 donors, ranking the fourth highest among the 18 Country-Based Pooled Funds (CBPF) around the world. Annual contributions to the SSHF have increased over the last three years, from $58 million in 2016 to $78 million in 2017 and $89 million in 2018.

To date in 2019, donors have already contributed $24.3 million to the Fund in donations. More funding is needed to ensure the SSHF can continue allocating resources so people can receive the help they need, when and where they need it.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Emergency Response (17 days ago)
Returnee population by age and sex
Returnee population by age and sex

More than 3,300 internally displaced people return to Baliet County, Upper Nile

A total of 3,324 internally displaced people, mainly women and children, have returned from Melut to their places of origin in Baliet County in Upper Nile. The return exercise was conducted between 7 and 28 May 2019, spearheaded by the Upper Nile Solutions Working Group. The joint approach involving humanitarian organizations, UNMISS and the government helped minimize the cost of the return and was the first movement of displaced people of this scale out of a settlement site in Upper Nile.

The effort to relocate the families followed an appeal by IDPs in five settlements in Melut town to the government to be returned to their homes. The reasons cited by the displaced people included family reunion and relatively improved security situation in most parts of Upper Nile, including Baliet County. Due to the lack of resources to relocate the IDPs, the government requested UNHCR to facilitate the exercise. UNHCR conducted surveys and verification exercises to ascertain people’s intentions.

Humanitarian organizations provided trucks for the movement of the displaced people and a three month food ration, essential household items and emergency shelter, and sanitation and hygiene materials. In addition, access to health, education, safe water and livelihood opportunities, including fishing and agriculture, were scaled up to ensure the returnees could easily reintegrate with their host communities.

Other response activities prior to the movement included setting up transit sites and sensitizing the host community on peaceful co-existence. The road through which the convoy travelled and the return areas were assessed by a mine action team, which also provided mine education to the returnees on arrival.  

The government ensured the safety and security of the displaced people during the return process. In Baliet, local authorities assisted in managing the reception sites and provided warehouse facilities free of charge for temporary storage of humanitarian supplies. The authorities issued a letter of assurance prior to the exercise and ensured that there were no checkpoints along the road.

The host communities and community leaders played an important role in receiving the returnees. They ensured that everyone, including persons with special needs, received due attention and were assisted in a proper manner.

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South Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis (26 days ago)
IPC acute food insecurity (May-July)
IPC acute food insecurity (May-July)

Almost 7 million people facing critical lack of food

The number of people likely to face acute food insecurity in South Sudan by the end of July has risen to the highest level yet, with an estimated 6.96 million people – 61 per cent of the South Sudanese population – affected, UN agencies have warned.

According to the Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC), by the end of July, 21,000 people will face a catastrophic lack of food access.   

Another 1.82 million people will be a step away from catastrophic food insecurity. Further, over 5 million people will face Crisis levels of food insecurity.

About 81,000 more people than originally estimated in a January forecast for May to July are facing Crisis levels of food insecurity or worse, particularly in Jonglei, Lakes, Unity and Northern Bahr el Ghazal.

Poor harvest in 2018 meant that the lean season – when people do not have enough food stocks to eat – started earlier this year. Delayed seasonal rains, that came in late May, compounded the situation. South Sudan’s harvest is largely dependent on rains.

Persistent economic instability, the impacts of previous years of conflict, and related asset depletion and population displacements have added to the disruption of livelihoods and reduced people's access to food.

“This update to the IPC reveals that much more work needs to be done. The recovery of food production and increased yields in South Sudan are reliant on the maintenance of peace, and must be given a chance,” said Meshack Malo, the Food and Agriculture Organization’s Representative in South Sudan.

“With greater stability in the country, access to those in need has improved, allowing us to treat more than 100,000 children suffering from severe malnutrition in the first five months of the year, with more than 90 per cent of those children recovering,” said Mohamed Ag Ayoya, UNICEF’s Representative in South Sudan. “But malnutrition levels remain critical in many areas and our fear is that the situation could worsen in the coming months.”

“The hunger season coincides with the rainy season and that’s a perfect storm in South Sudan,” said Ronald Sibanda, WFP’s Country Director in South Sudan. “As we ramp up our response, the race is now against time and nature – we must act now to save the lives and livelihoods of the millions on the brink of starvation.”

The three UN agencies called for effective implementation of the late-2018 revitalized peace agreement to allow scaled-up humanitarian assistance and to boost agricultural production across the country.

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Media (103 days ago)

We asked people who fled their homes because of the conflict in South Sudan to tell us about their lives. Watch this video, and hear what they said.