Sudan

Situation Report

Highlights

  • 6,000 vulnerable IDPs in Central/North Jebel Marra locality, Central Darfur receive food and nutrition assistance
  • Humanitarian partners continue to assist some 41,700 IDPs in El Geneina town, West Darfur
  • Estimated 14,000 people affected by violence in El Geneina have reportedly crossed into neighbouring Chad
Sudan map

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Sudan

Situation Report

Key Figures

9.3M
People in need (2020)
6.1M
People targeted (2020)
1.1M
Refugees
1.87M
IDPs

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Sudan

Situation Report

Funding

$1.1B
Required
$603.2M
Received
52%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Paola Emerson

Head of Office

Mary Keller

Head, Monitoring and Reporting

Sudan

Situation Report
Feature
Food distribution in Aja and Boulay (North/Central Jebel Marra locality) Central Darfur
Food distribution in Aja and Boulay, North/Central Jebel Marra locality (IA Mission, February 2020)

About 6,000 people in Aja and Boulay in Jebel Marra receive food assistance – the first in a decade

For the first time in a decade, the World Food Programme (WFP) delivered food and nutrition assistance to about 6,000 vulnerable displaced people in Aja and Boulay villages in Central/North Jebel Marra locality of Central Darfur. This came after an exploratory mission by humanitarian agencies which identified major humanitarian needs in the area. Aja is one of the villages in Central/North Jebel Marra locality in Central Darfur visited by humanitarian agencies in November 2019 for the first time in 13 years. An exploratory mission identified major needs for food, nutrition, health and education.

The Aja area is under the control of the Sudan Liberation Army (SLA-AW), with reports of conflict between two factions of the SLA-AW, which often results in civilian displacement and related needs. Local community leaders estimate that about 25,000 people live in the Aja area.

Based on the exploratory mission and discussion amongst humanitarian partners in Central Darfur, the humanitarian partners deployed an Inter-Sector Needs Assessment team to Aja and Boulay. As a result of intense negotiation with SLA/AW, it was agreed to facilitate the participation of technical line ministries staff in the needs assessment teams.

The Displacement Tracking Matrix (DTM) of the International Organization of Migration (IOM) also deployed a team register people residing in the two targeted areas. Needs for emergency humanitarian assistance were identified in almost all sectors and the DTM managed to verify 6,000 people in both locations. The sectors of water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) and non-food items (NFI) are identifying implementing partners who can deliver emergency shelter and WASH in kind assistance. In addition, the humanitarian team in Zalingei is working with Health, Education and Nutrition sectors to scale up services in these two areas.

The humanitarian team in Central Darfur is working with governmental authorities (both military and civilian components) and with SLA/AW and other factions to enable humanitarian teams in other areas in Jebel Marra. OCHA and partners have set a tentative schedule for exploratory and needs assessment missions to various areas up to May. These missions are expected to access more than 100,000 people to identify their humanitarian needs and subsequently deliver the required emergency humanitarian assistance. The humanitarian teams are racing to complete the planned missions before the rainy season, which starts in parts of Central Darfur in April. The rainy season can prevents teams from accessing these areas for at least three months due to roads blocked by flash floods and other physical impediments such as landslides.

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Sudan

Situation Report
Emergency Response
Population movements in El Geneina, West Darfur, Sudan
Population movements in El Geneina, West Darfur

Humanitarian response to IDPs in El Geneina, West Darfur continues while safety and security concerns remain a high priority

Humanitarian partners continue to assist the estimated 41,700 people (8,381 families) who fled inter-communal violence in early January and are currently sheltering in El Geneina town. In addition, an estimated 14,000 people have reportedly crossed into neighbouring Chad and are taking refuge in villages near the border.

Humanitarian response (updated as of 9 February)

Food Security

WFP is planning to provide emergency general food distributions (GFD) to an estimated 18,000 people affected by the conflict in villages surrounding El Geneina town, once food supplies arrive from Khartoum. WFP will also provide school meals once schools resume.

Health

WHO is supporting the State Ministry of Health (SMoH) to operate two temporary primary health care units at Altakhteet and Albohera gathering areas. WHO co-leads with the SMoH daily taskforce meetings where health sector partners meet and discuss health related issues. The international NGO World Relief (WR) continues to provide health assistance to people in El Geneina, including referrals to nearby hospitals or health facilities.

The international NGO International Medical Corps (IMC) continues providing health and nutrition services at the four primary health care centers it runs. These clinics have been functioning since early January. IMC provides medical and non-medical supplies to other clinics inside and outside of El Geneina town. IMC is also constructing and rehabilitating clinics. Lack of blankets and other related NFIs have contributed to the high respiratory tract infection cases within the new IDP community.

Sexual reproductive health (SRH)

UNFPA supported 3,640 vulnerable IDPs, mainly women and girls of reproductive age (15 to 49 years), with timely provision of 86 emergency reproductive health kits/supplies. UNFPA also provided lifesaving medicines and will support health clinics in Krinding 2 and Krinding 3—were looted or destroyed—with medical supplies and kits. The SMoH and UNFPA distributed 1,800 of clean delivery kits to SRH clinics in 30 IDPs gathering sites and medicines pregnant and lactating women. Supervisory visits were carried out to temporary clinics that provide SRH services in 20 IDP gathering sites.

Non-food items (NFIs)

The second round of the NFI distributions completed on 6 February, provided NFIs items that were not available in the first round to 1,560 families (about 8,000 people)—out of the 2,050 families targeted—completing their NFI package. In addition, some 490 vulnerable families (about 2,500 people)—who were not covered in the first round—received a full NFI package. Triangle Génération Humanitaire (TGH), Catholic Relief Services (CRS), DRRA, Médecins Sans Frontières – Spain (MSF-E), Save the Children, UNHCR, IOM, and HAC have also mobilized resources and staff to support response especially for long-term shelter solutions once they affected people, currently taking refuge in schools and other government buildings, relocate to more appropriate sites or locations. Sector partners also plan to provide services in affected villages in the vicinity to El Geneina town.

Nutrition

WHO and SMoH are providing nutritional support to children and pregnant and nursing mothers. WFP is providing nutritional services to IDPS in Krinding IDP camp. UNICEF has mobilized nutrition in-patient kits for the stabilization centre in El Geneina to ensure treatment of children with severe acute malnutrition (SAM) and complications. To address maternal and child health needs, UNICEF is supporting the SMoH with ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) and will support with transportation costs to deliver the supplies to where the displaced people are taking refuge. In collaboration with the SMoH, UNICEF has initiated a mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) screening for children under 5 years. Children with malnutrition are receiving the nutrition assistance they need.

WFP is planning to provide emergency nutrition Supplementary Feeding Programme targeting 5,040 children under 5 years and pregnant and nursing women. Long-lasting insecticide-treated nets (LLITNs) will be distributed to the new IDPs. UNICEF supported the immunization at gathering sites by providing 78 children under 1 year with their first dose of the measles vaccine.

Protection

UNHCR protection team continues to monitor all gathering points and support the community-based protection committees on protection monitoring. UNHCR, UNFPA and UNICEF facilitated trainings for social workers and psychologists on protection awareness and information campaigns, including the international legal framework, IDP guiding principles, and national IDP policy.

Child protection

UNICEF is supporting the youth initiative for support and reunification of children to establish five centres to serve 23 IDP gathering sites. In these centres, awareness sessions and collection of information on missing children will be carried out. UNICEF is also working with the State Council for Child Welfare (SCCW) as well as international and national partners to ensure that the safety and wellbeing of the most vulnerable children in El Geneina—mainly newly displaced children and those who have been separated or are unaccompanied.

Gender-based violence (GBV)

The SMoH women and family affairs unit, in coordination with the IDPs committee, distributed 2,000 dignity kits provided by UNFPA. The distributions were followed by awareness and sensitization sessions on personal hygiene and women protection issues. The selection of beneficiaries was done in consultation with the local committees including women representatives which us in line with UNFPA’s distribution criteria. As part of a joint capacity-building plan with UNICEF and UNHCR, 30 social workers and psychologists from El Geneina attended a two-day workshop on GBV in emergencies, focusing on safe GBV referrals, compassionate support for GBV survivors, and psychosocial support service.

Water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH)

There is an urgent need for sanitation services—especially latrines—in schools and IDP gathering points as current facilities are insufficient to meet the needs of the IDPs. The public water system cannot meet the increasing needs due to the lack of fuel to operate generators needed to operate the water pumps. In response, partners are carrying out water trucking to all gathering points. The increased numbers of IDPs at Gadima gathering area, who have not been properly registered, have negatively impacted the estimation of daily water needs.

Education

There is one school in Krinding camp that has resumed education services for all grades/classes, however, not all students have gone back to school. A back-to-school campaign is being organized to encourage children to return to school. Education materials have been distributed to all grade 8 (and some lower grades) students in Krinding camp. With support from UNICEF, grade 8 examination fees have been paid to the Ministry of Education and textbooks are expected to arrive soon for immediate distribution. The Ministry of Education will continue the distribution of education supplies to lower grade students at the gathering areas. In addition, there are two local charity groups that are distributing education materials to affected children. Education partners will reach out to these organizations to ensure better coordination of distributions.

Some of the challenges facing education partners is ensuring that proper security is in place at return areas so that students can resume their education. There is overcrowding at schools currently functioning in El Geneina town because 12 schools—of which seven are grade 8 examination centres—are hosting the new IDPs. Much advocacy is needed to relocate IDPs from schools to alternative safe locations or construct temporary learning spaces. Currently, there is a need to accommodate about 950 students to ease over-crowdedness in classrooms. Transportation is needed to transport students displaced in El Geneina to their schools in Krinding camp.

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Sudan

Situation Report
Forecast
Desert Locust Infestation in Sudan 2020
Desert Locust in Sudan as of January 2020

Desert locust poses a threat to food security in Sudan

“Desert Locust reached the threat level during January 2020 and is posing a threat to food security and all efforts need to be taken to mitigate this threat along with prevention and preparedness measures,” Sudan’s Federal Minister of Agriculture and Natural Resources, Eissa Osman Sharief said at a briefing on Desert Locust meeting which was held in Khartoum on 5 February 2020.

The ecological conditions remained favourable for Desert Locust breeding and developing throughout January. Surveys were conducted at summer breeding areas in Northern State, where scattered mature/immature adults of low density were found in all surveyed areas. The ecological conditions also remained favourable for Desert Locust breeding along the Red Sea coast, with vegetation cover green and soil moisture wet, which increases the risk of Desert Locust breeding and developing.

Ground and aerial control operations were carried out targeting mature and immature swarms, mature/immature adults as well as hopper groups and bands at the Red Sea southern and northern coast, sub coastal areas and Toker Delta. In total, 75,200 hectares (ha) of land (an equivalent of about 75,000 sport fields) were surveyed during to above mentioned period, out of which 18,714 ha were treated. For more information see the report.

However, “the main threat and challenge is that, there is a risk that internal locust breeding increased because of favourable ecological conditions as well as locust invasion from cross borders. Sudan cannot cope with this situation on its own and will need assistance,” the Minister Sharif said.

"Food security is threatened by the breeding Desert Locust, therefore we need to engage in pre-pre-emptive response and sustain the gains. For that we need the generous support of our donors," Ahmadu Babagana, FAO Representative said.

For more see the latest FAO Desert Locust Bulletin.

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Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis
Food security outlook January - May 2020 (FEWS NET)
Food security outlook January - May 2020 (FEWS NET)

Staple food prices continue to increase in Sudan during the main harvest according to FEWS NET

High prices of staple food and essential imported goods are making it harder for households in Darfur, Kordofan, and Red Sea states to meet their livelihoods needs. Most IDPs in areas controlled by the Sudan People’s Liberation Movement – North (SPLM-N) in South Kordofan, those in the Jebel Marra area of Darfur, and those in poor areas of Red Sea and Kassala states continue to face crisis (IPC Phase 3) levels of food security during the harvest period—when families are unable to get enough food and malnutrition rates are higher than normal levels. Emergency (IPC Phase 4) levels of food security—when families are unable to access enough food leading to high levels of malnutrition, increasing deaths and families are forced to sell assets to buy food—are expected in conflict-affected areas of South Kordofan by May 2020, reports FEWS NET.

According to the latest FEWS NET report, the cereal yields for the main agricultural harvest for 2019/2020 (sorghum and millet) are lower this season due to flooding; an extended rainy season; pest infestations; and an increase in the area planted for cash crops, leading to a decrease in the area planted for cereal crops, which will likely further decrease cereal production compared to previous years.

Typically, during the harvest time prices of sorghum and millet decrease however, this year prices have increased by 20 to 45 per cent since November 2019 across most markets. This increase has been attributed to the expected lower than normal cereal production and the high production and transportation costs due to the continued economic difficulties that country is facing, reports FEWS NET.

For more information see the latest FEWS NET report.

 

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Sudan

Situation Report
Emergency Response
Displacement to Abyei town
Displacement to Abyei town. The boundaries and names shown and the designations used in this map do not imply official endorsement or acceptance by the United Nations.

Response in disputed Abyei continues

Humanitarian organizations continue to assist an estimated 4,800 people who fled Kolom village due to violence and sought refuge in Abyei town. This assistance includes food, nutrition, health, WASH, protection, NFI and other assistance to the newly displaced people. The Abyei Relief and Rehabilitation Committee (RRC) plans to relocate the new IDPs in Abyei town to three new locations as there is no area in the town large enough to accommodate all the IDPs. The Abyentan area will host IDPs from Kolom village; Nyinkuac will host IDPs from Noong village; and an area near a market will host IDPs from Amiet and Dakura villages.

Health / Nutrition

The South Sudan-based international NGO Goal , will continue providing medical services in Abyei town every Monday and Wednesday for the next four weeks, as per the needs from the IDPs.

UNICEF will provide nutrition supplies—including food rations, anthropometric equipment, stationery and therapeutic milk—to ongoing nutrition programmes in Abyei.

WASH

To promote safe hygiene practices and reduce the risk of diarrheal diseases among the affected communities, UNICEF distributed WASH supplies which include buckets, collapsible Jeri-cans and soap to over 350 Households in 3 IDP locations during a joint distribution exercise with IOM. WFP provided logistical support for the distribution exercise by providing a vehicle.

Goal distributed soap to 786 IDP families and WASH partners set up temporary latrines at the Abyei Boys Secondary school (3-stance for Men and 4-stance for women) to be used by the IDPs from Kolom.

Education

To support the primary schools, UNICEF has provided five Early Childhood Development (ECD) kits and four recreational kits to support school and community recreational and psychosocial support interventions in the area. The education supplies will be delivered to the education authorities in Abyei town soon.

Food

On 30 January, food was distributed to IDPs from Kolom taking refuge in the Abyei Boys School.  

*The disputed Abyei area is between Sudan and South Sudan. The final status of the Abyei area is not yet determined.

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Sudan

Situation Report
Visual

Sudan declared cholera free as of 23 January 2020

Sudan declared cholera free as of 23 January 2020

On 23 January 2020, the Government of Sudan declared the end of the cholera outbreak in the country. The first case of cholera was reported on 8 September 2019 in Blue Nile State and later spread to Sennar, Khartoum and El Gezira states. During this outbreak, 346 suspected cholera cases were reported, including 11 deaths.

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Sudan

Situation Report
Interactive

Sudan: Interactive Who does What and Where (3Ws)

The Who does What Where (3W) is designed to show where humanitarian organizations are working and what they are doing in order to identify gaps and plan for future humanitarian response.  This interactive dataset includes a list of humanitarian organizations by state and sector currently registered in Sudan.

Have updates? Contact OCHAsudan@un.org.

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