Sudan

Situation Report

Highlights

  • For the first time Sudan endorses national standard operating procedures on gender-based violence prevention and response.
  • Sudan map now available with all 189 localities.
  • The Sudan Ministry of Agriculture announces that the national production of sorghum and millet in 2019/20 is less than last year.
  • FAO requests US$9 million for desert locust response in Sudan
  • Sudan Humanitarian Fund completes monitoring mission in Central Darfur’s Jebel Marra area as access continues to improve.
Sudan map

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Sudan

Situation Report

Key Figures

9.3M
People in need (2020)
6.1M
People targeted (2020)
1.1M
Refugees
1.87M
IDPs

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Sudan

Situation Report

Funding

$1.3B
Required
$103.9M
Received
8%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Paola Emerson

Head of Office

Mary Keller

Head, Monitoring and Reporting

Sudan

Situation Report
Feature

For the first time Sudan endorses national standard operating procedures on GBV prevention and response in Sudan

On 17 February the Government of Sudan launched the national standard operating procedures (SoPs) on gender-based violence (GBV) prevention and response. Building on international principles, these SoPs have been developed in Arabic through a collaborative process led by the Ministry of Labour and Social Development (MoLSD)-Combating of Violence Against Women (CVAW) Directorate, engaging UN agencies, as well as government, non-government, and community-based organizations in the process. The national GBV SOPs clearly establish the procedures, roles, and responsibilities of each actor involved in GBV response including mutually agreed referral pathways and mechanisms for obtaining survivor consent. These will be used together with existing national and international guidelines for the prevention of and response to GBV.

The launch was presided by the Minister of Labour and Social Development, Ms. Lena El Sheikh, who stressed that women's rights are a priority for Sudan and that women played a pioneering role in building society. She also noted that that GBV is one of the greatest challenges in society and in endorsing these SoPs a move has been made to achieve justice and women's rights. The Minister stressed that applying these SoPs to address GBV is the responsibility at all legal, health and social levels.

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Sudan

Situation Report
Trends
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A woman in Darfur collecting millet (UNAMID, Archive)

The national production of sorghum and millet in 2019/20 is less than last year – Sudan Ministry of Agriculture

According to the Ministry of Agriculture and Natural Resources (MoANR) food supply assessment for Sudan (CFSAM), the national total production of sorghum and millet in 2019/20 is estimated at 5.1 million tonnes, 36 per cent below the previous year’s record output and 18 per cent less than the past five-year average. This could have serious effect on the food security in the count where an estimated 5.8 million people (14 per cent of the total population) are experiencing Crisis or worse levels of food insecurity, according to the latest Integrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) Sudan: Acute Food Insecurity Situation for June - August 2019 report. This figure is the highest on record since the introduction of the IPC analysis in Sudan. Around 1 million people are facing Emergency levels of acute food insecurity (IPC Phase 4) and around 4.8 million people are in Crisis (IPC Phase 3), while nearly 11.8 million are estimated to be in Stress Phase (IPC Phase 2), the report states. Overall, 162 localities from 17 states have been classified out of the 18 Sudan States.

The CFSAM assessment was carried out by MoANR—with assistance from the United Nations Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and other partners—between 24 November and 14 December 2019 to determine crop production and food supply situation throughout all 18 states in the country.

The decline in production can be attributed to farmers shifting crop production to more remunerative cash crops, such as sesame and groundnuts, compounded by lower yields resulting from unfavourable weather conditions and pest infestation. Constraints on the availability of, and accessibility to, agricultural inputs were reported as a result of high and increasing inflation, which also led to soaring costs of production. Despite the Government’s efforts to meet the needs of the agricultural sector, fuel shortages and delays in fuel deliveries were reported in several parts of the country. A mid-season assessment, carried out by the MoARN, showed that the amount of fuel supplied in 2019 for land preparation, planting and weeding was 36 per cent of the total requirements, while it was 52 per cent in 2018. Farmers were forced to purchase fuel from the parallel market, paying three to four times the official price. This resulted in an overall increase in production costs.

The incidence of pests, diseases and weeds in the 2019 summer cropping season were significantly higher than in the previous years and affected production. Abnormal weather events weakened crops, while the overall more humid environment—due to the long rainy season—favoured the proliferation of weeds and pests at the final stages of crop growth, during grain development and filling. Rat infestations were reported at significant levels in Kassala, Blue Nile, West Kordofan, South Kordofan, White Nile and Darfur states. The early onset of summer rains in May improved soil moisture and vegetation growth, stimulating rodent reproduction. During the prolonged dry spell of July, enlarged populations caused serious damage to crops during planting. In addition, despite continuous monitoring and control measures put in place by the Sudan’s Plant Protection Division, numerous attacks by birds were reported in important crop production areas.

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Sudan

Situation Report
Forecast
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Desert locust map (FAO)

FAO requests US$9 million for desert locust response in Sudan

Desert locust breeding continues along the Red Sea in Sudan and poses a serious threat to crop and livestock production in an area that is already highly food insecure.

For response in Sudan, FAO has requested US$9 million to support control measures, safeguard livelihoods and promote early recovery. This is in addition to the appeal calling for $138 million for rapid response and anticipatory action in the Greater Horn of Africa.

FAO has so far mobilized $1.55 million, including $1 million from the Sudan Humanitarian Fund (SHF). The United Kingdom's Department for International Development (DFID) announced they will provide an additional $2 million to the SHF, which will be used for the desert locust response.

Intensive surveillance of locust breeding areas as well as effective ground and aerial control operations are urgently needed in order to detect and reduce locust populations, prevent more swarms from forming and avoid the spread of the pest to crop and pasture areas. Unless sustained control operations are carried out, significant agricultural losses are likely. This would exacerbate already high levels of food insecurity (5.8 million people are facing IPC Phase 3 and above [June–August 2019]), particularly in rural areas.

The Government of Sudan has been leading the response, with surveillance conducted on 1 million hectares and ground and aerial control operations treating about 300, 000 hectares with pesticides. Currently, the government needs more vehicles (for spraying), pesticides, field equipment and funds for operational expenses.

According to the February issue of the Desert Locust Bulletin by Sudan’s Plant Protection Directorate (PPD), the ecological conditions remain favourable for the increase in the number of desert locust and formation of additional hopper bands and hopper groups. Due to the desert locust situation in neighbouring countries, more swarms are likely to invade the green areas at the winter breeding areas in Sudan. Further, as a result of the dry conditions at the northern part of the Red Sea coast swarms might migrate to summer breeding areas in Northern and River Nile states.

For more information on the Desert Locust and Desert locust crisis in East Africa click here

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Sudan

Situation Report
Visual

Sudan map now available with all 189 localities

08 Sudan map 02Mar20 A3 GoS

The Geographic Information System (GIS) team at the Central Bureau of Statistics (CBS), the National Information Centre, the Ministry of Federal Governance, the Sudanese Survey Authority(the Governmental body mandated in authorizing the geographic boundaries) UNICEF and OCHA collaborated to update the administrative boundaries for the map of Sudan. The new map reflects the agreed boundaries for all 18 states and 189 localities in the country. The finalized state boundaries and localities have been uploaded onto the Government of Sudan’s Geospatial Data Centre website. This common operational data is a critical element for shared planning and decision-making among humanitarian, development and government partners.

Click to download the map

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Sudan

Situation Report
Analysis
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Solar powered mini-water yard upgraded from a hand pump by TGH with SHF funds (OCHA, January 2020)

As humanitarian access improves, the SHF provides more resources to meet needs in Jebel Mara

Humanitarian access for both people in need and humanitarian actors in Central Darfur’s Jebel Marra area continues to improve. The Sudan Humanitarian Fund (SHF) conducted a monitoring mission in the area at the end of January 2020. Road transport between Golo (Central/North Jebel Marra locality) and Nertiti (West Jebel Marra locality) has progressively improved in the last six months allowing for better movement of people and goods between the two areas. Up-to last year, operations were limited within Golo town as a result of insecurity; accessible areas have expanded by more than five kilometres to the west and south of the town.

In 2019, SHF allocated US$5.8 million to four partners providing food security and livelihoods support (FSL), as well as education, health, nutrition and protection assistance. The catchment area for these projects are 11 villages (Golo, Karon, Ausajin, Kormon, Buray, Yara, Terri, Kilinj, and Kerol) and surrounding smaller villages around the Buray valley. An estimated 130,000 people were targeted including 24,600 men; 29,733 women; 35,887 boys and 39,980 girls. Partners in Golo managed to reach about 36,188 people 12,426 men; 15,466 women; 4,151 boys and 4,147 girls.

SHF programming in Golo

In Golo, community leaders, HAC and volunteers from the community expressed satisfaction with the existing projects. They requested additional interventions for rainwater harvesting like the project funded by the USAID Office of US Foreign Disaster Assistance (OFDA) which supported the construction of a small dam in Koron village. The rainwater collected in this dam is used for drinking, irrigation purposes and possibly recharges underground water sources. Youth would like income generating activities to assist them build their skills and provide for their families. The community also requested the timely distribution of seeds and other agricultural tools to coincide with the rainy season.

SHF programming in Zalingei

In Zalingei, SHF is funding eight health clinics run by international NGOs International Medical Corps (IMC) and World Relief (WR). In addition, WR is providing nutrition services in areas like Dankoj village (31km from Zalingei town) for the first time. It is also the first-time people in Dankoj are receiving protection services with one community-based protection network (CBPN) established in the village. The community requested more education interventions, especially in Dankoj village. The village has one school with three unequipped and roofless classrooms. In addition, the SHF team visited two schools in Alsholaa and Alsalam areas of Zalingei town. Both schools are in need of rehabilitation and furniture, mainly benches, for the students. In Alsalam, the monitoring team saw a group of 64 first grade pupils sitting under a rakooba (small thatch shelter), with only four benches available. The people at Hasahisa IDP camp—which has an estimated population of 43,390 people—are in need of health and water services. Only four of the 19 hand pumps in the camp are functioning, due to lack of maintenance, according to the community representatives who met the mission team. In addition, the camp needs protection activities.

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Sudan

Situation Report
Emergency Response
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Demographic data of new IDPs in El Geneina town (source: IOM)

IOM completes new estimates for people displaced by inter-communal fighting in El Geneina, West Darfur while humanitarian response is ongoing

Since 10 January 2020, the International Organization for Migration (IOM) has been monitoring the displacement of people affected by inter-communal violence in West Darfur though its displacement tracking matrix. As of 25 February, IOM has estimates that there are 37,908 people (8, 250 families) from 11 locations taking refuge across 35 displacement sites in El Geneina town. This updated figure indicates a decrease of 2,109 displaced persons from the area since the previous update on 09 February 2020. Reports from the humanitarian actors on the ground suggest that IDPs whose homes were unaffected are now returning to their locations of origin.

Of the total IDP caseload an estimated 20,765 (55%) were female and 17,143 (45%) were male. Further disaggregation by age indicates 18 to 59 as the predominant age category (24% females, 18% males), followed by ages 6 to 17 (14% females, 12% males), 0 to 5 (13% females, 12% males) and 60 and over (4% females, 3% males).

Humanitarian actors continue to assist affected people taking refuge in EL Geneina town. Health, nutrition, water, sanitation, hygiene (WASH), and non-food items (NFIs) assistance is being provided at the gathering sites. Psychosocial counselling and follow up on protection issues and cases are also being carried out. Water is being trucked to most of the gathering points and partners have established six child friendly spaces (CFS) in six sites. As of 17 February, 1,950, children returned to school when 32 classes from lower grades resumed education services. Attendance, however, is low due to the distance of schools from El Geneina town (where IDPs are now residing) and the absence of school feeding programmes, which have just been started. A request has been sent to the Wali’s office to support with buses to transport children to school. In addition, the Ministry of Education (MoE) is looking for alternative spaces to hold exams for students from the seven schools that are still occupied by IDPs.

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Situation Report
Trends
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Increasing food prices are at record highs - FAO

Prices of locally grown sorghum and millet continued to increase in December 2019 and January 2020 despite the recently concluded 2019 harvest, according to the most recent issue of the Food Prices Monitoring and Analysis (FPMA) Bulletin by the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO). Prices of imported wheat also rose further in January and at faster rates, surging by 20 per cent. In general, prices of cereals reached record highs, up to twice the already high levels of one year earlier. This was mainly triggered by a poor 2019 cereal output and a weak currency, coupled with fuel shortages and high prices of agricultural inputs inflating production and transportation costs, according to FPMA.

According to the preliminary findings of the Government-led 2019 Crop and Food Supply Assessment Mission, the 2019 coarse grains (sorghum and millet) production is estimated at about 5.2 million tonnes, 36 per cent below the bumper 2018 output and 18 percent below the average of the previous five years. The main driver of the production shortfall was a combination of prolonged dry spells in July followed by heavy late season rains, which triggered widespread floods. Severe pest infestations further affected yields.

FEWS Net reported earlier this year that according to available field information, yields for key cereals, such as sorghum and millet, are lower than usual this season due to flooding, an extended rainy season, and pest infestations. In addition, field reports suggest increases in area planted in cash crops have led to decreases in area planted for cereal crops, which is likely to drive further declines in cereal production compared to previous years.

Meanwhile, the World Food Programme (WFP) reported in its Market Monitor for January 2020 that high prices are likely to stay and continue at its high level as the current season harvest is not favorable (see sorghum prices chart below). The national average retail price of sorghum was SDG26.87/kg, which is increased by 15 per cent compared to the previous month.

The national average retail price of goat was SDG3,874/head, which is increased by 7 per cent compared to the previous month. The national average retail price of groundnut was SDG1,361/sack, which increased by 9 per cent compared to the previous month. The national average cost of local food basket was SDG38.1, which slightly increased by 13 per cent compared to the previous month.

According to the 2020 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP), 6.2 million people across Sudan will need food and livelihoods assistance. HRP partners aim to provide food and livelihood assistance to 4.7 million most vulnerable people. As of 26 February, the 2020 HRP is only 8 per cent funded, with $1.24 billion requirement unmet.

For more information on the funding status of the 2020 Sudan HRP, please click here

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Sudan

Situation Report
Trends
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Trends of people targeted vs people reached since 2015

Sudan: Trends in humanitarian response and financial requirements, 2015 - 2020

During the past five years, Sudan has seen an overall increase in the number of people in need of humanitarian assistance from 5.4 million people in 2015 to 9.3 million in 2020. In 2019, 4.3 million people were reached with some form of assistance, against a target of 4.4 million people. The number of people reached was half of the 8.5 million of people estimated to be in need. Between 2016 and 2018, the number of people reached in relation to the overall number of people in need remained steady with an annual average of 4.1 million people reached. Since 2015, the level of funding received has remained on average between $500 million and $600 million.

The Sudan Humanitarian Fund (SHF) is a cost-effective way to support humanitarian action in Sudan. Under the direction of the Humanitarian Coordinator (HC), the SHF aims to support the timely allocation and disbursement of donor resources to the most critical humanitarian needs as defined by the Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) or any agreed upon strategy by the HC such as the HCT protection strategy, the HCT gender strategy and the HCT advocacy strategy. The SHF also supports area-based programming, and when relevant funding is available multi-year programming. The SHF provides funding to international and national non–governmental organizations and UN agencies. The SHF receives voluntary donor contributions and supports humanitarian response year–round. In 2020, financial management of the SHF has moved from UNDP to OCHA Sudan.

For more information on current and historical humanitarian funding data for Sudan go to the Financial Tracking Service (FTS)

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Sudan

Situation Report
Coordination

Gender equality programming in the 2020 Humanitarian Response Plan

Deep-rooted gender inequality, anchored in cultural norms, persists throughout parts of Sudan and requires the humanitarian system to consider the specific needs of women, men, boys and girls in any intervention. The humanitarian community is working to mitigate gender protection risks, particularly gender-based violence (GBV), and to effectively mainstream and integrate gender equality and the empowerment of women in the overall response.

To ensure gender equality programming among humanitarian partners, particularly for the 2020 Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP), OCHA Sudan carried out a series of training sessions in 2019 on Gender and Age Marker (GAM) for humanitarian partners, which is a tool to increase gender and age responsive programming. In addition, the Resident Coordinator’s Office senior gender advisor and UN Women carried out discussions with sector coordinators at the inter-sector coordination group (ISCG) level for ensuring systematic inclusion of gender considerations across all sectors. Partners will focus on strengthening capacities of all stakeholders to undertake gender analysis and collection of sex and age disaggregated data; empowerment, participation, and engagement of women; protection of the most vulnerable and promoting access to basic services for women, girls and unaccompanied children.

In Sudan’s 2020 Humanitarian Response Plan, approximately 53 per cent of Humanitarian Programme Cycle projects applied the GAM. This is an increase from 42 per cent in the 2019 HRP.

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Sudan

Situation Report
Interactive

Sudan: Interactive Who does What and Where (3Ws)

The Who does What Where (3W) is designed to show where humanitarian organizations are working and what they are doing in order to identify gaps and plan for future humanitarian response.  This interactive dataset includes a list of humanitarian organizations by state and sector currently registered in Sudan.

Have updates? Contact OCHAsudan@un.org.

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