Ukraine

Situation Report

Highlights (15 days ago)

  • Integration of internally displaced persons in Ukraine remains a challenge
  • Attacks on education facilities in eastern Ukraine have tripled, while funds to assist remain at record lows
  • Ukraine Humanitarian Fund - an effective and agile response by all, for all
Credit: UNICEF/UN/0300571/Filippov
Credit: UNICEF/UN/0300571/Filippov

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Key Figures

5.2M
People affected
3.5M
People in Need
2.3M
People targeted to reach

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Ukraine

Situation Report

Funding (2019)

$161.7M
Requirements
$25M
Funding
15%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Alice Armanni Sequi

Head of Office

Jean-Francois Ruel

New York Desk Officer

Valijon Ranoev

Public Information/Reporting Officer

Ukraine

Situation Report
Analysis (15 days ago)
“I don’t have anywhere else to go. I cannot stay at my sister’s house forever too,” Anatolii, 62, moved in to live temporarily with his sister’s family in Toretsk, after his house was burnt down to ashes by shells in May 2018. Credit: OCHA/V. Ranoev/2018
“I don’t have anywhere else to go. I cannot stay at my sister’s house forever too,” Anatolii, 62, moved in to live temporarily with his sister’s family in Toretsk, after his house was burnt down to ashes by shells in May 2018. Credit: OCHA/V. Ranoev/2018

Integration of internally displaced persons in Ukraine remains a challenge

About 1.3 million conflict-induced internally displaced persons (IDPs) were registered across the country by the Ministry of Social Policy (MoSP) in March 2019. Despite a national strategy on the integration of IDPs and finding long-term solutions, many IDPs still face significant challenges to integrate into local communities. 

The latest survey on IDPs undertaken by the International Organization for Migration (IOM) reveals that as of December 2018, only half of IDPs reported to have been integrated into local communities, citing that housing, regular income and employment were the main conditions for their integration.

According to the survey, conducted every quarter, IDP households continue to suffer from general economic insecurity. Average monthly income per IDP household member was considerably lower compared to Ukrainian households (apprx. US$92 vs. $166) and still lower compared to the actual subsistence level, which is US$128, calculated by MSoP. Over 50 per cent of surveyed IDPs noted that they still rely heavily on government support, followed by pension and social assistance as source of income, demonstrating the lack of full-fledged programmes at the community level for their self-sufficiency. At the time of the survey (December 2018), 51 per cent of IDPs assessed their financial situation as having “enough funds only for food,” or “having to limit their expenses even for food,”, which is a 7 per cent increase compared to December 2017.

After years of internal displacement, durable solutions are still elusive for many IDPs in Ukraine. In late 2018, the Government of Ukraine developed an action plan to implement the national IDP strategy. While this is ground-breaking work, and indication of the commitment that the Government of Ukraine has towards IDPs, the results of the latest survey, demonstrate that the plan has not been fully translated into concrete actions, particularly at oblast and local levels. 

The findings of the Report on Regional IDP Integration Programmes in Ukraine reveal the need to link national programmes with local context; and to increase the capacities of local authorities on the integration of IDPs into communities.  Professor Walter Kaelin, a global IDP expert, will travel to Kharkiv and Dnipro in June 2019 to help strengthen local capacities and to contribute to addressing some of the challenges of IDP integration.

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Ukraine

Situation Report
Analysis (18 days ago)
Education damages-01-01

Attacks on education facilities in eastern Ukraine have tripled, while funds to assist remain at record lows

The conflict in eastern Ukraine entered into its sixth year this spring. Children, and other vulnerable groups, are among the most at risk and bear the heaviest brunt. Hostilities and the presence of landmines on both sides of the “contact line” place thousands of girls and boys at daily risk, while also leaving long-term psychological scars. Children also have limited access to safe and protective learning environments as many schools in eastern Ukraine are no longer safe. 

The Education Cluster released daunting numbers of attacks on schools. Between January and mid-May 2019, attacks on educational facilities, located on both sides of the “contact line”, have tripled compared with the same period in 2018. At least 14 instances have been recorded between 1 January to 14 May 2019, when schools came under shelling and small-arms fire, damaging facilities and disrupting classes. This is almost three times more than the incidents recorded during the same period in 2018 - and close to the number of incidents recorded by the Cluster during 2018 (16 in number). The increase in frequency of the attacks so far this year reminds us of the challenges to adhere to International Humanitarian Law and makes the endorsement and implementation of the Safe Schools Deceleration (SSD) even more critical.

Some 750 education facilities have been damaged and disrupted in eastern Ukraine since the start of the conflict in 2014. One school, in Zolote-5 (Luhanska oblast), with serves over 100 girls and boys, has come under fire eight times already this year. It even had to close for a month due to insecurity, leaving children without classes. Temporary closure of schools due to insecurity, including proximity of military personnel or equipment, is not new to the children and teachers in eastern Ukraine. Some 50 schools were temporarily closed last year due to the conflict, with two similar instances recorded so far this year. 

Today, over 700,000 children and teachers need humanitarian assistance and protection and some 3,500 schools need safety. Against this background, funding for child protection and education programmes under the 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan remains inadequate, with only less than 7 per cent of the required funds received so far. Nevertheless, humanitarians continue to stretch to address children’s needs. According to a response monitoring report released earlier in April, in 2018 alone, over 210,000 children on both sides of the “contact line” have benefited from humanitarian assistance, including through repair and rehabilitation of over 100 schools, systems to allow children to continue their education remotely, provision of school supplies, and support with psychosocial counselling and mine-risk education.

Raising awareness on the risks that children face in eastern Ukraine and advocating for their protection is one of the top priorities of the international community. On the launch of a campaign called “Stop the War on Children” by Save the Children in Ukraine earlier in May, the UN Resident/Humanitarian Coordinator in Ukraine called the Government to speed up with the endorsement of the SSD, protect children and education facilities from the harms of the conflict and increase donor funding for humanitarian education and child protection programmes.   

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Ukraine

Situation Report
Feature (17 days ago)
UHF v1-01

Ukraine Humanitarian Fund - an effective and agile response by all, for all

In a changing and fluid context of eastern Ukraine, an agile response and the ability to steer resources directly to the most critical parts of the operation, when and where they are needed the most, is of utmost importance. The humanitarian actors on the ground continue to explore different channels and innovative processes, to mobilise more funds and reach more people, in the most effective way. In March, the United Nations Under-Secretary-General for Humanitarian Affairs and Emergency Relief Coordinator (USG/ERC), Mark Lowcock, launched the Ukraine Humanitarian Fund (UHF) - to support a coordinated humanitarian action in line with the 2019 HRP and to address the most critical needs.

The UHF, which is expected to be fully operational by June 2019, will ensure more efficient and streamlined humanitarian response by targeting needs, which otherwise would go unattended and by strengthening access to people in need, particularly along the ‘contact line’ and in areas beyond the Government’s control. The Fund, one of the 18 across the world, will provide an optimal solution for donors, who are otherwise unable to directly fund humanitarian operations due to limited access to implementing partners or lack of accountability mechanisms on the ground. Even individual donors can support the Fund: https://act.unfoundation.org/onlineactions/D47Mjcz_6ECF1PLeCnHIIw2   

Under the leadership of the HC, UHF funding is directly available to a wide range of relief partners – including national and international non-governmental organizations (NGOs), UN Agencies and Red Cross/Red Crescent Organizations. This ensures that funding is available and prioritized at the local level by those closest to the people in need.

So far, several donors have expressed strong support for the fund with pledges and commitments above US$4 million. It is critical for others to join in and support the Fund.

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Ukraine

Situation Report
Background (15 days ago)
Map of Eastern Ukraine
Eastern Ukraine with the 427-km long "contact line" and five checkpoints

Humanitarian Context

As the crisis in eastern Ukraine is well into its fifth year, civilians continue to bear its heaviest brunt. Fear of shelling, violent clashes, or treading on one of the many landmines or unexploded remnants of war (eastern Ukraine has been branded one of the world’s most mine-contaminated areas) are the daily reality for millions of people living on both sides of the over 420-km-long "contact-line", which is about the length of the French-German border. Since the start of the conflict, more than 3,320 civilian men, women and children have been killed and another 9,000 injured.

The crisis in eastern Ukraine has become protracted. The long-term consequences are serious with daily hostilities damaging critical infrastructure and often disrupting essential services, such as water supply and sanitation facilities. Every month, more than 1.1 million civilian crossings were recorded at the five checkpoints in 2018, where people often have to endure long waiting hours in the bitter cold in winter and scorching heat in summer to maintain family links and access basic services. This is especially arduous for the elderly, who make up 30 per cent of all people in need, the highest proportion in the world. People are increasingly affected by mental health issues having lived in fear for far too long, and lacking self-esteem after losing their job. The economic situation of the Donbas region, once the economic heartland of Ukraine, is dire which has seriously impacted household wellbeing and living standards.

Despite enormous challenges, the UN and its humanitarian partners continue to deliver lifesaving assistance to millions of people across the country every month. Over the course of 2018, more than 1.3 people benefited from some form of humanitarian assistance and protection services. Since 2014, over US$470 million has been mobilised through humanitarian response plans.

The humanitarian response is coordinated within six clusters: Shelter and Non-Food Items; Protection; Health and Nutrition; Education; Water, Sanitation and Hygiene; and Food Security and Livelihoods. Cluster partners conduct joint assessments, coordinate the response and monitor humanitarian assistance and programming. Relief and early recovery supplies, including food and non-food items, shelter materials, medicine, psychosocial support and hygienic and education kits are distributed. Access to safe drinking water through in-kind as well as cash assistance is provided. Other urgent humanitarian assistance includes provision of farming inputs, mine clearance and mine-risk education as well as other protection services.

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Media (44 days ago)

What it takes to live in eastern Ukraine? Spend two minutes with Sergii and his family who have been living in fear of shelling and landmines for almost five years.