Venezuela - July 2020

Situation Report

Highlights

  • As of 14 September, 61,569 cases of COVID-19 have been reported, including 49,371 recoveries and 494 deaths. Capital District, Miranda, Zulia and Apure states are most affected..
  • People continue to return to Venezuela, and between the beginning of April and the beginning of September, more than 90,000 people have returned through land borders.
  • As of July 2020, humanitarian actors have reached 3.4 million people, including 1.9 million people as part of the response to COVID-19.
  • The socioeconomic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic raise concerns about the possible exacerbation of humanitarian needs across the region and in Venezuela.
  • As of 15 September, US$ 139.9 million were received for the humanitarian response, including funds for the United Nations, international and national NGOs.
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July 2020. San Cristóbal, Táchira, Filling of shower tanks installed by humanitarian actors in a temporary shelter where returnees are quarantined as a COVID-19 prevention measure. OCHA/Cortes

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Venezuela - July 2020

Situation Report

Key Figures

3.4M
Received humanitarian aid as of July
1.9M
Reached with COVID-19 response as of July
238
HRP projects

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Venezuela - July 2020

Situation Report

Funding

$762,5M
Required in 2020
$139,9M
Received in 2020

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Contacts

Naomi Frerotte

Public Information Officer

Samir Elhawary

Deputy Humanitarian Coordinator/Head of Office

Venezuela - July 2020

Situation Report
Background

Situation Overview

As of 14 September, authorities have recorded 61,569 cases of COVID-19 in the country, including 49,371 recoveries and 494 deaths. In July there was a 300 per cent increase in the number of confirmed cases, with an average of 403 daily cases. Since the beginning of July, there have been more community transmission cases than imported cases. As of 14 September, authorities had recorded 8,100 cases among returnees, representing 12.9 per cent of all cases.

The capital region has become the main zone of transmission of the virus, surpassing the infection rates of the border states. Caracas and the nearby state of Miranda have reported the most active cases.

Regarding the impact of COVID-19 among indigenous communities, PAHO/WHO reported that between the confirmation of the first cases in the country and up to 2 August, 179 cases were confirmed among indigenous populations, including three deaths. Bolívar state reported 68.5 per cent of these cases (123) while the rest were reported in the states of Zulia (43 cases, 2 deaths), Amazonas (12 cases) and Delta Amacuro (1 fatal case). The Pemón and Wayú indigenous ethnic groups have been the most affected.

As of 14 September, a total of 1,864,663 diagnostic tests for COVID-19 have been performed, including rapid diagnostic tests and PCR tests. Authorities continue deploying efforts to decentralize and increase PCR diagnostic capacity with the support of PAHO/WHO. Consequently, PAHO/WHO is working towards strengthening diagnostic capacities as part of the collaboration agreement between the Ministry of Popular Power for Health and the advisory team of the National Assembly, to continue implementing the COVID-19 response priorities. On 6 September, the Regional Public Health Laboratory “Dr. Félix Pifano ” was inaugurated in Yaracuy state. The Laboratory will provide services to the people living in the state of Yaracuy, as well as those living in the states of Lara, Portuguesa, Cojedes and neighboring municipalities. With the new Félix Pifano laboratory in Yaracuy state and José Gregorio Hernández laboratory in Miranda state, the country has now reached five centers able to process samples for molecular testing (PCR). The three other centers are the Rafael Rangel National Hygiene Institute, its mobile laboratory, and the VenezuelanInstitute of Scientific Research (IVIC).

The trend of people returning to the country continues, with authorities estimating that more than 90,000 people have returned to Venezuela across land borders since the beginning of April, the majority through the state of Táchira. The 96 temporary accommodation spaces (PASI) established by authorities in border states (Táchira, Apure, Amazonas, Delta Amacuro, Zulia and La Guaira), continue to provide services to returnees who must fulfill a quarantine period of at least two weeks before being transferred to their destination states. At the national level, due to the increase in the number of community transmission cases in several areas, national and regional authorities have established additional spaces in hotels, sports centers and convention or sports villages for the temporary accommodation of asymptomatic people diagnosed with COVID-19, and those only displaying mild symptoms. On 9 August, national authorities announced a thirty-day extension of the State of Emergency as well as the mandatory quarantine and physical distancing measures that have been implemented since 13 March, extending the validity of the decree for 30 days. The National Institute of Civil Aeronautics announced the restriction of air operations for the same period throughout the country with the exception of cargo, humanitarian, repatriation, mail, or flights authorized by the United Nations. The authorities have continued to implement the quarantine scheme and partial flexibility of activities with a differentiated application at three levels, ranging from radical quarantine to the implementation of the relaxation of some sectors alternating seven days of activity with seven days of quarantine, according to evaluations carried out by the authorities based on the territorial evolution of the situation. Gasoline shortages are reported in most of the country, despite the implementation of the dual pricing scheme, which includes subsidized and unsubsidized prices. Several weeks without fuel are reported in various areas, while several towns that still have a supply have restricted the provision of the service to priority sectors. In various states of the country, limitations in access to water, energy, gas and telecommunications services continue to be reported. There are reports of frequent power outages that affect several states, some exceeding 8 or 10 hours a day, as well as the growing number of people using biomass and firewood for cooking due to the lack of domestic gas. The socioeconomic impacts of the COVID-19 pandemic have increased concern regarding the possible exacerbation of humanitarian needs across the region and in Venezuela. According to ECLAC predictions on the evolution and impact of COVID-19 in Latin America, Venezuela's Gross Domestic Product will decrease by 26 per cent in 2020, in the context of a regional decline that will also affect unemployment rates, poverty and inequality. In this regard, FAO has indicated that the increase in poverty in the region will further increase the risks of a food crisis, not because of the lack of food, but because of the scarcity of resources to acquire it, with Venezuela being one of the most affected countries in the region. In particular, the drop in purchasing power linked to low minimum wages and high inflation limit people's ability to access quality food and diets.

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Venezuela - July 2020

Situation Report
Visual

5W - Operational Humanitarian Presence

Operational Humanitarian Presence

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Venezuela - July 2020

Situation Report
Analysis
funding update

Funding

According to data from the Financial Tracking Service (FTS), as of 15 September, US $139.9 million was received for the humanitarian response, including US $61.9 million within the Humanitarian Response Plan 2020, including funds for the United Nations, international and national NGOs and the International Red Cross and Red Crescent Movement.

The agencies and countries that contribute to humanitarian activities are the following: the European Union, United States, United Kingdom, Sweden, Switzerland, United Nations Central Emergency Fund (CERF), Canada, Germany and others.

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Venezuela - July 2020

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Health

178,126
People received medical supplies in July

Needs

As of 1 August 2020, Venezuela has reported 4,258 cases of dengue - with an incidence rate of 13.5 cases per 100,000 inhabitants. These include 187 laboratory-confirmed cases, 18 severe cases and 9 deaths, representing a lethality rate of 0.211 per cent. Although there was a 43.2 per cent decrease in reported dengue cases (7,503 cases), the case fatality rate doubled compared to the same period in 2019 (0.107 per cent), and is higher than the average case fatality rate in the Americas (0.036 per cent). In this context, early identification through warning signs and management of cases is necessary to reduce the number of dengue cases requiring hospitalization, alleviating the additional burden on more complex levels of care needed for severe cases of COVID-19 infection.

From 13 March to 14 September 2020, Venezuela recorded 61,569 COVID-19 cases confirmed by PCR testing. To date, 494 deaths have been reported, representing a mortality rate of 0.8 per cent in the last 30 days, one of the lowest in the region. According to the Government, as of 14 September, 85.9 per cent of confirmed cases are linked to community transmissions (52,929) while 14 per cent are imported (8,665). A comparison of the total number of cases reported in June (18,574) with the number of cases reported as of 14 September (61,569) shows an increase by 231.4 per cent.

The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) has planned to provide Venezuela with some 370,000 antigen tests to help detect COVID-19, which cost less than PCR, yield faster results and allow for stratification in the search for contagion. In addition, there has been an increase in the number of tests performed, which has included the decentralization of the tests and the opening of new laboratories.

It is imperative to expand diagnostic capacity through confirmatory testing for COVID-19 among the general population, health workers and at-risk groups, such as migrants and indigenous populations; in addition to continuing to reorganize health services, in order to be able to manage the impact of increased cases and deaths, associated with the likelihood of under-reporting of cases, and delays in surveillance and contact tracing. The provision of personal protective equipment (PPE) for personnel in health facilities, in PASIs at border points, and personnel who make home visits, among others, should continue to be prioritized in order to prevent the spread of infection to this population group. Based on consultations with the Ministry of Popular Power for Health (MPSS) and the National Assembly, it is estimated that there is an urgent need for at least 300,150 surgical Na 95 masks, three million face masks, and 10,000 biological protection suits, among other PPEs.

Response

Activities ran by members of the Health Cluster have enabled to ensure the provision of equipment, supplies, essential drugs and Sexual and Reproductive Health services, which have benefited 16,886 people - attended in 5 outpatient clinics, 20 popular clinics, 8 Maternity wards and 30 hospitals in 10 states. In the context of COVID-19, 178,126 people benefited from the delivery of medicines and medical supplies in 31 health establishments, 53 integrated community health areas (ASIC) and 2 outpatient clinics in the states of Apure, Amazonas, Bolívar, Capital District, Miranda, Táchira, Yaracuy and Zulia, where there is a high incidence of COVID-19 confirmed cases. The Pan American Health Organization (PAHO) delivered more than 20 tons of personal protective equipment, including 1.2 million masks, 200,000 respirator masks, 130,000 face masks, 21,000 surgical gowns and 9,000 safety protective glasses, in 31 hospitals and other health centers, with the aim of strengthening the biosecurity of health personnel who care for the population affected by COVID-19 in the states of Apure, Bolívar, Capital District, Miranda, Táchira and Zulia. In addition, the United Nations Development Program (UNDP) initiated a scheme for the delivery of hospital supplies to the Ministry of Popular Power for Health (MPPS) in order to provide 400,000 masks in 52 integrated community health areas (ASIC), located in the Capital District, Miranda, Zulia, Táchira, Apure and Amazonas, as well as disinfection kits in 16 prioritized sentinel hospitals located in the states of Zulia, Táchira, Bolívar, Amazonas, Nueva Esparta and the Capital District. In July, members of the Health Cluster trained 903 health workers in prioritized issues, taking into account age, gender and diversity, in 14 health facilities in the country. 140 health workers were also trained with a focus on caring for COVID-19 patients in six PASIs and three health facilities in Bolívar and Miranda states. 4,897 people benefited from community capacity-strengthening activities in areas of disease prevention, health promotion through awareness raising sessions, prevention measures in sexual and reproductive health, delivery of contraceptive methods and pregnancy care, in 11 outpatient clinics, 9 Integrated Diagnostic Centers, 8 Hospitals and 9 PASIs in 6 states of the country. Through Health Cluster partner activities, the monitoring of 7,265 people living with HIV with antiretroviral treatment was strengthened through the Pharmacies of the National HIV Program of 14 health establishments in 10 states of the country. Similarly, 4,356 people from 28 institutions in seven states benefited from the strengthening of epidemiological surveillance and information systems. Likewise, 22,143 people from specific vulnerable populations (boys, girls, adolescents, pregnant women, indigenous people, people with disabilities, among others) benefitted from reinforced care capacity in 13 outpatient clinics, 8 Integrated Diagnosis Centers, 10 Hospitals, 3 PASIs in 6 states of the country. 7,198 returnees - including pregrant women and their respective partners - benefited from HIV / Syphilis serological testing.

Gaps

Low capacity to confirm suspected or probable cases of COVID-19. Limited access of humanitarian actors to indigenous communities to support the strengthening of prevention and response to COVID-19 considering that they are both at-risk and vulnerable populations. The timely availability and adequate quantity of personal protective equipment (PPE) for health personnel. The ability to increase health services at scale given the increase in COVID-19 cases to avoid oversaturation and maintain the supply of services for the care of other priority pathologies (HIV/aids, cancer, diabetes, maternal and child health, etc.). The ability to maintain early detection, timely care, and epidemiological surveillance of vector-borne diseases, especially in vulnerable groups in the context of COVID-19. It is necessary to maintain the management of key health information and data - to facilitate adequate assessments and serve as a guide in health facilities throughout the country. Continued fuel shortages in many areas of the country are directly affecting health response logistics.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Nutrition

6,204
Children received deworming in July

Needs

In July, partners made significant progress in adapting health and nutrition services to the pandemic protocols, to ensure continuity in the provision of services. However, nutritional needs persist, and are reflected in the activity reports of implementing partners. In July, UNICEF and its partners reported that 14.5 per cent of children under 5 years of age who were screened in 10 states are at risk of acute malnutrition. In addition, the vulnerability of pregnant and lactating women may deepen due to the impact of the current economic situation. According to reports by partners, 26 per cent of pregnant and lactating women who were screened in care centers were underweight.

Response

More than 3,500 children and adolescents received prevention of acute malnutrition services with the supply of micronutrients in 10 states of the country. Some 6,204 children under 5 years of age received deworming treatment in partner care centers.

In July, as part of the cluster's nutritional strategy, 195 boys and girls under the age of 5 received nutritional care services to overcome acute malnutrition. Additionally, among the age group of 5 to 15 years old, 3 children received treatment for acute malnutrition in Miranda.

In July, some 1,836 lactating women received breastfeeding counseling to promote and support good practices for infant and young child feeding with a multisectoral approach. In order to improve access to outpatient health services and nutrition programs at the community level, in July, cluster partners conducted nutritional screenings among 4,744 children under 5 years of age in 12 states of the country. More than 70 per cent of these children were cared for in the states of Anzoátegui and Bolívar. International protocols issued by the Global Nutrition Cluster and WHO on the adaptation of nutritional services in care centers have been implemented to give continuity to the nutritional strategy, respecting social distancing and taking measures to prevent contagion.

Gaps

Partners have reported the suspension of visits and face-to-face consultations in care centers, considerably reducing the volume and coverage of services, due to national measures to prevent the transmission of COVID-19. The need persists to provide health and nutrition services to children and adolescents, pregnant and lactating women, and elderly populations who are in temporary accommodation spaces established along borders for returnees. Although efforts have been deployed by partners to have a greater presence and provide nutritional care to returnees, greater coordination is required between humanitarian actors and authorities to expand coverage.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Protection

134,935
Received protection services in July

Needs

Efforts must be continued to strengthen the protection environment for vulnerable groups, including returnees, who continue to require protection to avoid negative consequences on their physical and mental well-being and to guarantee the access of these groups to basic social and protection services - including psychosocial care and legal assistance. The closure of borders continues to limit opportunities for people who depend on cross-border mobility as a coping strategy to stock up on food, medicine, goods and to access services. In the state of Táchira, some partners have reported the smuggling of medicines and basic necessities purchased in Colombia at a high price. This, together with the increase in needs, especially in terms of food security, increases the adoption of negative coping strategies that deepen the risks of contagion and exploitation. In July, the number of people affected by COVID-19 increased significantly, with high transmissibility in Greater Caracas and the states of La Guaira and Miranda. Protection risks for children and adolescents in these states have increased with the quarantine measures, since stressful situations and confined family environments may increase violence, exploitation and abuse, especially for the most vulnerable groups.

Response

In July, members of the Protection Cluster reached a total of 134,935 women, men, children and adolescents with activities throughout all 23 states and the Capital District. The states where the Protection cluster reached the most beneficiaries were Miranda (35,692), Zulia (30,247), Apure (14,979), Bolívar (11,242) and the Capital District (7,534). 1,172 adults and elderly persons at risk were reached with specialized services, including psychosocial care and legal assistance. Some 109 adults benefited from access to legal documentation, and 414 people with specific needs benefited from material assistance. Similarly, some 8,823 people received training in matters of prevention and mitigation of protection risks. Through strengthening the capacities of institutions in the states of Apure, Bolívar and Zulia, some 12,673 people benefited from material supplies that allow officials to ensure the rights of people with specific needs in those states. In July, some 853 girls, adolescents and adult women benefited from response services to Gender-Based Violence (GBV), including case management services (264), legal support (39) and individual psychosocial assistance (550). A total of 11,109 children, adolescents and adults benefited from GBV prevention activities, including the delivery of dignity kits that reached a total of 2,703 girls and adult women in 17 Comprehensive Social Care Points (PASI) in the states of Apure, Bolívar, Táchira and Zulia, and training on prevention and mitigation of GBV (8,406). Similarly, 698 civil servants and officials from State institutions were trained in areas of prevention and mitigation of GBV, thus strengthening their response capacities to GBV. A total of 5,417 children and adolescents at risk (mostly between 12 and 17 years old) and their caregivers benefited from individual and group psychosocial support activities. 41,264 girls and boys under 3 months of age were granted birth certificates in hospitals (no civil birth records were reported) and a total of 6,758 affected and at-risk children and adolescents benefitted from administrative services and child protection programs. In addition, 45,570 people from the community were trained on issues of child and adolescent protection (including the Protection Guide "Protege") and 124 people from State institutions working in areas relating to children and adolescents benefited from materials and training to prevent and respond to violence, abuse, neglect and exploitation of children.

Gaps

Persons with disabilities represented only one per cent of all persons receiving protection assistance in July. To address this gap, an inter-sectoral working group is being established under the coordination of the Protection Cluster and its partner CONSORVEN with a view to strengthen the inclusion of people with disabilities in the Humanitarian Programming Cycle in 2021. It is necessary for different clusters to guarantee the availability of multi-sectoral response services to GBV, including ensuring the provision of spaces for survivors of GBV, the inclusion of survivors and people at risk of GBV in cash transfer programs (CBT / TM), the mitigation of negative coping mechanisms, which have increased during the pandemic, the provision of sexual and reproductive health services that include distributing contraceptive methods and offering pre, postnatal and delivery care. It is essential to identify alternative forms of care for returnees and vulnerable communities based on the level of access of humanitarian actors to PASIs. The implementation of activities on the ground is made even more complex due to challenges in public services, including difficulties for mobility between the different municipalities due to the lack of fuel. In this sense, strengthening response services for children and adolescents, including through Protection Councils and Municipal Councils and strengthening the capacities of officials is paramount.

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Venezuela - July 2020

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene

351,950
People reached in July

Needs

The increase in the number of positive cases of COVID-19 is accentuating the pressure on water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) services, both in PASIs and health facilities and in communities, where prevention measures require greater support of WASH services.

Response

In July, 14 cluster members reported having reached 351,950 people across 68 municipalities in 16 states of the country. In 2020, the sector response includes the contributions of 31 organizations reaching 2,314,617 people across 124 municipalities in 23 states of the country. In relation to assistance in health facilities, 75 centers received WASH support, including the provision of Infection Prevention and Control (PCI) supplies, the rehabilitation / supply of water, and / or the promotion of hygiene and PCI elements . These interventions include 29 centers where support is being provided for the first time. In July, WASH assistance also reached some 265 protection or education centers, mainly in the supply of water by tanker, as well as with interventions to guarantee safe water and sanitation, through the rehabilitation of bathrooms and the distribution of hygiene items. In total, the number of protection and education centers that benefited from WASH interventions or supplies amount to approximately 570 since the beginning of the year. In terms of community support, a total of 115,400 people benefited from WASH interventions, most of them in Miranda (34,485), Bolívar (11,700), Lara (7,000), Capital District (5,750), Apure (5,240 ), Zulia (2,130) and Delta Amacuro (1,170). This brings the total number of people who received community support between January and July to 1,765,675, mainly in Táchira (1,197,270), Miranda (278,000), Bolívar (113,940), and Delta Amacuro (75,200).

Gaps

In health centers, gaps are being reported in cleaning/ disinfection products and infectious waste disposal mechanisms. Planned activities need to be complemented to ensure complete WASH / PCI packages. Needs in terms of WASH in temporary accommodation spaces (PASIs) have grown with the increase in returnees. However, response capacity is limited due to lack of financial resources. COVID-19 prevention and quarantine measures limit the possibilities for training, implementation and distribution of supplies by the organizations that are providing assistance. The lack of access to fuel affects the entire chain of production and supply of services. In addition, there are some non-governmental organizations who have the means to provide support but require permits to contribute to the response.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Food Security

125,261
Benefited from activities in July

Needs

According to data from the interagency report The State of Food Security and Nutrition in the World (SOFI 2020), the cost of a healthy diet in the region is the highest in the world, with an average value of USD 3.98 per day per person, which, together with the depreciation of the minimum wage and high inflation in Venezuela limits people's ability to access quality food and diets. Partners are concerned about the drop in the production of corn and rice during the planting cycle. Regarding corn, 112,000 hectares were planted this year - 88,000 hectares less than in 2019 or a decrease by 40 per cent. In the rice sector the decrease was even greater - from 75,000 hectares in 2019 to 37,500 in 2020 - that is, 50 per cent less. Returnees require assistance and nutritional support. Not only is there a need to support them in temporary accommodation spaces (PASI) with direct food assistance, but there is also a need to support returnees and host communities in destination states, as well as in bordering rural areas, to boost local food production and contribute to income generation.

Response

In July, 125,261 people benefited from food security activities, including food distribution and production, across 102 municipalities in 23 states. The main activities reported by Cluster partners were: - Technical strengthening and provision of equipment for public institutions and local organizations that implement food and nutritional security activities, feasibility analysis for intervention modalities, and training in various trades that support food production, planting and the acquisition of livelihood skills. - Supply of seeds, tools, small equipment, animals, and technical assistance for food production to meet immediate needs, with special attention to female headed households. - Distribution of complementary food to educational institutions, community centers and health centers; support for the production and distribution of nutritionally enriched foods for people with specific needs, and; distribution of food to vulnerable people, with particular attention to women and girls at risk, and families with children under 5 years of age with acute malnutrition. - Cash or coupon distributions to vulnerable households, with special attention to female headed households.

Gaps

It is necessary to strengthen the response capacity of the Cluster and mobilize more resources to meet the scale of needs. Cash transfer assistance modalities (CBT / TM) can be a mechanism to respond to emergency food needs, once the fiscal conditions and legal framework for this type of assistance are clarified. The fuel shortage in some states of the country continues to impact agricultural and livestock unions that express concern about the consequences of not being able to use the machinery and equipment necessary for food production, as well as their transfer from Apure, Barinas, Lara, Táchira and Zulia states.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Education

20,851
Received educational material in July

Needs

The transition from a classroom system to a remote modality due to the context of COVID-19 has been a challenge for the educational system and all stakeholders. Cluster partners warn that the closure of schools due to COVID-19 has increased the risks of domestic and gender-based violence for children and adolescents, as well as the impact on mental health and psychosocial support needs. The conditions for educational continuity during the preventive closure of schools are adverse, including reduced access to connectivity, limited technological availability and instability of electricity service. These circumstances affect the most vulnerable children and adolescents with greater impact, such as those with disabilities, indigenous populations, and those in hospital situations.

Response

In July, with the aim of improving the conditions for learning and educational continuity for children and adolescents in schools, the distribution of educational materials at the household level continued, reaching a total of 20,851 children and adolescents (49 per cent girls and 51 per cent boys), especially in the Capital District and Zulia. 40,432 children and adolescents (51 per cent girls and 49 per cent boys) also benefited from distributions of dry food or from school feeding programs at the household level, reaching mainly children from Bolívar and Zulia. A total of 3,274 adolescents and youth (46 per cent girls and 54 per cent boys) participated in initiatives aiming at promoting educational leveling, life skills and technical training in remote formats, especially in Zulia. 69,406 children and adolescents participated in psycho-educational support activities online, by telephone or through home visits (53 per cent girls and 47 per cent boys) in Miranda and Táchira. Some 2,921 teachers (80 per cent women and 20 per cent men) were trained virtually on emergency education approaches in the state of Miranda. Within the framework of the response to COVID-19, distance education activities were incorporated through multiplatform resources (television, radio, online, print) for children and adolescents affected by the closure of schools. During this period, 8,494 students were reached, mainly in Miranda and Zulia.

Gaps

Low international funding for the sector aggravates the situation and puts the sustainability of actions at risk. This is especially critical for local and community organizations that receive less support. For example, in relation to initiatives for educational reintegration of children and adolescents out of school, the gap is 97 per cent; in the distribution of school supply kits the gap is 85 percent and in school feeding the gap that remains to be covered is 67 per cent. Despite efforts by national authorities and the support of the Cluster in esnuring availability of multi-platform distance learning, access is different between states, which is deepened by the lack of international financing for sustainable sources of internet access, improvement of electricity service and technological investment in remote communities. Support towards the educational sector for the reception and inclusion of returned populations is also under-financed.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Shelter, Energy and Non-Food Items (NFIs)

27,000
Received shelter/NFI assistance in July

Needs

-

Response

In July, some 27,150 people (55 per cent women and 45 per cent men) benefited from improved access to safe accommodation, energy and / or basic appliances in seven states of the country, including Táchira (15,457), La Guaira ( 5,765) and Bolívar (4,825,) which had the highest number of people reached. Most of the response was focused on interventions to address COVID-19, including responding to the needs of returnees. The rest of the interventions targeted people with specific needs in prioritized communities, taking into account gender, age and diversity. COVID-19 care activities in temporary accommodation spaces, including PASIs and isolation centers, were mostly located in La Guaria ("Los Caracas isolation center") and several PASIs in the states of Miranda and Táchira, reaching 8,995 people. In the Los Caracas isolation center, solar lamps for public lighting were installed in community areas, basic appliances were provided, including mats, and the electrical system was improved, with panel installations, 85 wall lamps and 100 light bulbs. In addition, in July, the installation of 12 prefabricated housing units in the outer area of ​​the center was completed to expand total capacity and strengthen the triage system. One of the PASIs in Miranda state was equipped with kitchen kits to support a total of 200 people, while several PASIs in Táchira (Colón, Rubio and San Cristóbal municipalities) were supported with solar lamps for public lighting in community areas. In July, the management capacities of 68 staff members of the PASIs of La Guaira, Miranda, Zulia and Apure continued to be strengthened. Kits for people on the move and habitat kits were also distributed, reaching 1,350 beneficiaries in the states of Amazonas, Bolívar and Táchira. Regarding interventions carried out in community centers and spaces, power plants were installed and structural renovations were carried out in the outpatient clinics of El Cuquí and La Concordia (Táchira state). The rehabilitation of the Fundación Social Simón Bolívar health facility (Bolívar state) was also completed, including the installation of three prefabricated housing units. In total, these interventions reached 5,350 people. To strengthen the capacities of the institutions and community centers, equipment supplies were distributed, including kitchen kits, solar lamps and Individual Protection Equipment (PPE) in community centers in the Caroní municipalities (Bolívar state) and Junín, San Cristóbal, García Hevia and Ayacucho (Táchira state), reaching 5,713 people. At the individual level, 634 solar lamps were distributed in prioritized communities in the states of Apure, Bolívar, Miranda and Táchira, reaching 4,880 people. The kits contained personal protection supplies such as masks and antibacterial gel. Other interventions included distributions of basic equipment (including hammocks and mosquito nets) for people with specific needs among communities in Bolívar and Zulia states.

Gaps

In some states, especially Amazonas, Bolívar and Delta Amacuro, the limited presence of partners and the distances to cover these territories continue to be a difficulty for the implementation of projects. Due to access and fuel supply limitations that restrict mobility, some humanitarian organizations have had to suspend or postpone operations.

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Situation Report

Cluster Status

Logistics

Needs

Due to quarantine measures to deal with COVID-19, humanitarian actors continue to face access challenges impacting the implementation of their projects. Organizations require support to obtain permits that allow them to maintain activities in the field, and to guarantee the supply of fuel in their areas of operation.

Response

The Cluster continues its coordination and support activities with information management, providing updates and reports in terms of logistics capacity, restrictions and access. This includes the publication of guidelines and mechanisms within the framework of the COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan. The Cluster supported the organization of the ECHO Humanitarian Airlift flights (co-sponsored by the European Union, Spain and Portugal) by disseminating and ensuring that the appropriate information reached interested organizations. The flight allowed the repatriation of vulnerable persons and humanitarian personnel, as well as the cargo transport of 79.1 tons of medical supplies, water, sanitation and hygiene, nutrition and protective equipment for seven humanitarian agencies and organizations. The Cluster supported the compilation and dissemination of information for the repatriation flights organized by the Spanish Embassy and humanitarian flights organized by the World Food Program to Venezuela from the operational centers in Panama and Mexico.

Gaps

Disruptions in the global supply chain, including restrictions on air and maritime traffic, and border closures, continue to impact the ability to procure supplies on a global scale. There have been common efforts to activate common transportation services and an interagency prioritization system for purchases of critical supplies within the COVID-19 Global Humanitarian Response Plan. The closure of airspace and borders has made entry and exit conditions difficult for humanitarian personnel, especially for NGOs, affecting the development of their programs and the effectiveness of their response to the pandemic. The first flights, planned for August, organized and managed as part of the World Food Program's logistical support to the global response faced some initial challenges with paperwork to facilitate the movement of humanitarian personnel.

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Situation Report
Coordination

Coordination

The Field Coordination Centers maintain liaison with the authorities and local partners to support the needs assessment, the implementation of the response and the training in the management of temporary accommodation spaces, as well as advocacy on logistics and access. Within the framework of capacity-building activities for national organizations, OCHA and several members of coordination structures supported a Cycle of online trainings on the Humanitarian Architecture organized by humanitarian partners for more than 30 local organizations. The National Humanitarian Action Platform (PAHNAL), made up of national NGOs, held a first meeting with representatives of the main donor countries in Venezuela, in which the progress and challenges facing the humanitarian response were addressed and information on financing of the Humanitarian Response Plan was updated.

The Humanitarian Country Team finalized the access strategy that defines key joint actions to address and mitigate the main barriers identified in terms of the politicization of humanitarian assistance, bureaucratic impediments, physical and infrastructure limitations, security and protection of humanitarian actors and restrictions on mobility due to COVID-19. In addition, the Humanitarian Country Team approved the Collective Framework of Accountability to Affected Communities and Populations, which offers a guide of minimum actions to put into practice in the humanitarian response in Venezuela. Within the efforts to strengthen Accountability to Affected Populations within the framework of the Humanitarian Response Plan, representatives of 60 humanitarian organizations (national and international NGOs and United Nations agencies) participated in the first Interagency Course for the Comprehensive Approach to Accountability to Affecteded Populations (AAP) in Venezuela.

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Venezuela - July 2020

Situation Report
Analysis

Common operational challenges

The humanitarian response urgently requires more funding to maintain and expand implemented activities. Many partners highlight critical funding gaps including to strengthen the response to COVID-19. Humanitarian organizations must adapt their response modalities in the context of the pandemic, to minimize the risk of contagion, especially for staff who are on the frontlines of the response. Logistical challenges have increased due to movement limitations throughout the national territory, including delays in the importation of certain supplies, availability of transportation, and fuel shortages. The scale of the needs requires a humanitarian response with greater operational capacity, including greater access for national and international NGOs with experience in health emergencies and in line with humanitarian principles.

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