Yemen

Situation Report

Highlights

  • Attacks on civilians in Sa’ada a cause for concern
  • Thousands of migrants gather at the Saudi border after hazardous journey through Yemen
  • Humanitarian partners respond to dengue outbreak
  • The Yemen aid operation on course
Yemen Humanitarian Update No. 13 Cover
A boy in Al Rabat Collective Centre for displaced people in Lahj Governorate, Yemen. 30 November 2018

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Yemen

Situation Report

Key Figures

24.1M
People in Need
14.3M
People in Acute Need
3.65M
Displaced People

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Situation Report

Funding

$4.2B
Required
$3.5B
Received
84%
Progress
FTS

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Contacts

Sebastien Trives

Head of Office

Tapiwa Gomo

Head of Communication

Yemen

Situation Report
Trends

Attacks on civilians in Sa’ada a cause for concern

Despite the partial ceasefire along the Yemen-Saudi border, the northern frontlines have remained active. The Sa’ada Governorate, located in the northern border with the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA), continues to see high levels of civilian impact, which is largely caused by cross-border shelling and airstrikes affecting civilians - mainly Somalis and Ethiopians migrants, refugees and asylum seekers – and civilian infrastructure.

On 29 July, scores of people were killed and injured in an attack on Al Thabit market in Qatabir District. According to the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (OHCHR), 14 civilians including four children were killed and a further 27 civilians including 14 children were injured in the attack. OHCHR also verified the killing of 9 civilians and the injury of 36 in shelling attacks that occurred on 20 and 27 November on Al-Raqw market in Monabbih District in Sa›ada. Many of the killed and wounded on 27 November are Ethiopians.

Ms. Lise Grande, Humanitarian Coordinator in Yemen expressed concern at the human cost of the war which is becoming more unbearable. “What is happening in Yemen doesn›t make sense. The fighting needs to end, and end now. Every indiscriminate attack on civilians violates international humanitarian law. None of these can be justified—none of them.” In all these incidents, humanitarian partners in Monabbih and Qatabir districts supported local hospitals to treat the injured and help was also provided to the local communities affected by the attack.

Overall, despite the ongoing war and escalating humanitarian crisis in the country, 2019 saw a spike in the number of arrivals of East African asylum seekers, refugees and migrants to Yemen which is the largest mixed migration route out of East Africa. Since the beginning of the year, an estimated 120,680 migrants have entered Yemen. Al Thabet, Al-Raqw and Al Gar are the three main crossing points in Monabbih District for migrants from Yemen to Kingdom of Saudi Arabia (KSA). Migrants face serious protection risks such as arbitrary and abusive detention, trafficking and lack of access to food, water and medical services.

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Yemen

Situation Report
Analysis
Humanitarian partners respond to dengue outbreak
An estimated 1,000 migrants cross the border from Yemen to Saudi Arabia every day. Photo: OCHA

Thousands of migrants gather at the Saudi border after hazardous journey through Yemen

The route from the southern Yemeni coastline to the northern border with Saudi Arabia is hazardous for the thousands of migrants who undertake the journey. More than 10,000 migrants arrive by boat in Yemen every month, over 9,000 are Ethiopian and the rest are mainly Somali refugees. Many migrants make their way north through Yemen hoping to cross the border in search of work in Saudi Arabia or other Gulf states, a journey that can take between a week and several months.

An estimated 1,000 migrants cross the border from Yemen into Saudi Arabia every day - approximately 65 per cent are men, 25 per cent are women, and 10 per cent are children. Humanitarian and protection needs among migrants waiting to make the crossing are acute - many have endured hunger, thirst, poor health and abuse on their journey, and conditions at the border are harsh. A small number of humanitarian organizations operate in the border area, and partners are working to scale-up their response.

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Situation Report
Emergency Response
Dengue vector control campaign in Taizz
Second round of dengue vector control campaign in Taiz. Photo: WHO

Humanitarian partners to respond dengue outbreak

As of 17 November, the World Health Organisation (WHO) recorded 37,480 suspected cases of dengue fever and 150 related deaths across Yemen - nearly 10,000 more cases than in the whole of 2018, when 28,051 suspected cases and 46 related deaths were reported. Dengue is a mosquito-borne viral disease widespread throughout the tropics. Symptoms often start between 3 and 14 days after infection and may include a high fever, headache, vomiting, muscle and joint pains, and a characteristic skin rash. According to WHO, there is no specific treatment for dengue. Early detection of disease progression associated with severe dengue, and access to proper medical care, reduces fatality rates to below 1 per cent.

Some 154 districts have reported suspected dengue cases between mid-October and mid-November and 93 per cent of cases reported were from five governorates: Hodeidah (43 per cent), Taizz (23 per cent), Hajjah (19 per cent), Lahj (4 per cent) and Aden (4 per cent). The governorates registering the highest incidences of dengue fever per 10,000 population are Aden (48.5), Abyan (46.2), Lahj (34.5), Al Hudaydah (31.2), (24.7), Shabwah (22.3) and Marib (20.8).

Humanitarian partners, working with national and local health authorities, are scaling up the response to dengue in affected areas, providing treatment and medical supplies, and working to prevent the disease from spreading further. Of 160,000 dengue rapid diagnostic test kits distributed to date, 95,000 were delivered to southern governorates with the rest going to governorates in the north of the country. Fog spraying, entomological surveys, and case management training are ongoing and are provided alongside health education and source reduction campaigns in Aden, Lahj, Al-Dhale’e, Abyan, Hadramout, Al Mahrah, Hajjah, Al Hudaydah and Taizz.

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Visual

Suspected number of cases of dengue fever in 2018 and 2019 (to mid-November)

Suspected number of cases of dengue fever in 2018 and 2019 (to mid-November)

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Situation Report
Analysis

The Yemen aid operation on course

The Yemen humanitarian aid operation continues to be the largest in the world reaching an average of 11.4 million people each month, an increase of 49 per cent on 2018. This is despite a myriad of operational challenges such as delayed disbursement of pledges by donors in the first nine months of the year, ongoing conflict and other access restrictions.

However, by mid-December, the Yemen humanitarian operation had mobilized $3.88 billion, of which $3.48 billion is for activities within the 2019 Humanitarian Response Plan (YHRP). This represents 83 per cent of the YHRP requirement for 2019 and the most funded in the world. Thanks to donor support, aid agencies were able to roll back catastrophic food insecurity in 29 of 45 districts facing Integrated Phase Classification 5 conditions, help millions of Yemenis overcome hunger, reduce the disease caseload and preserve the capacity of public sector institutions to deliver life-saving basic services.

The Food Security and Agriculture Cluster (FSAC) had scaled up to reach 11.2 million people with monthly emergency food assistance - 91per cent of the monthly target by the end of October, and a massive increase compared to the 7.5 million people reached each month in 2018. The number of people assisted by the FSAC through cash was at the highest ever, with nearly half million people reached in three governorates in the south alone. Meanwhile, 4.8 million people of the nearly 6 million targeted received nutrition support and treatment by the end of October. While this is lower than the 5.8 million people reached in 2018, it represents 80 per cent of the cluster target for in 2019.

Amid a high number of cases of communicable diseases including cholera, dengue and malaria, the Health Cluster continued to scale up its response efforts reaching 15 million people by October, 3 million more than in 2018. To curb further spread of the cholera outbreak, the oral cholera vaccination campaigns (OCV) launched in 2018 continued into 2019 with nearly 4.3 million doses distributed, reaching more than 2.7 million people by the end of November. To complement these efforts, by October WASH Cluster partners were reaching nearly 11.2 million people of their 12.6 million target for 2019 with water, sanitation and hygiene services.

Of the 2.8 million children targeted for support by the Education Cluster, 2.3 million received education services by October. The support includes, allowances for unpaid teachers, school meals for children, establishing temporary learning classrooms (TLCs) for displaced children, learning materials, facilitating national exams, specialized child-centered programmes in hard-hit areas among others. The assistance has helped ensure schools remain open and operational and that children in the targeted areas have uninterrupted access to education.

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Situation Report
Visual

Cluster achievements as of October 2019

Cluster achievements as of October 2019

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