Zambia

Situation Report

Highlights

  • The daily number of COVID-19 cases continues to decline according to the Ministry of Health.
  • As of 29 October, Zambia reported 16,325 COVID-19 cases and 348 deaths (2.1 per cent case fatality rate).
  • Out of the country's 116 districts, 86 have reported cases of COVID-19 with Lusaka (43 per cent) continuing to have the highest rate of transmission.
  • About 78 per cent of schools have access to handwashing facilities and 88 per cent of school children and teachers have masks, according to the Ministry of Education.
  • African Migratory Locusts have been reported in 10 districts in the south-west of the country.
Handwashing in Zambia
Ceasar, 15, washes his hands using a tippy-tap at his home in Gwembe Valley. © UNICEF/Karin Schermbrucker

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Zambia

Situation Report

Key Figures

10.1M
people in need
6.2M
people targeted
27
partners operational

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Zambia

Situation Report

Funding

$132.9M
requested (May-Oct 2020)
$50.5M
received
39.5%
funded

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Contacts

Laura Hastings

Humanitarian Affairs Officer, Zambia

Guiomar Pau Sole

Head of Communications & Information Management, Regional Office for Southern & Eastern Africa

Zambia

Situation Report
Background
Map
COVID-19 cases by district

Situation Overview

Since the first reported COVID-19 case on 18 March 2020, the Ministry of Health (MOH) has confirmed over 16,300 cases with 348 deaths with a case fatality rate of 2.1 per cent. MOH has conducted over 249,200 COVID-19 tests to date and scaled up support to 13 laboratories increasing testing capacity to approximately 2,500 tests per day with a test positivity rate below 5 per cent. On 12 September, school were fully reopened along with bars and restaurants.

Preliminary results of a rapid food security assessment conducted by the Food Security sector between 2 and 9 September in the urban districts of Livingstone and Kitwe to ascertain the impacts of COVID-19 on livelihoods and food security indicate that 131,279 people (26,256 households) residing in 45 high density and low-income urban areas were food insecure due to the impacts of COVID-19 and in need of humanitarian assistance. This was after a similar assessment was done in Lusaka and Kafue districts in which 190,000 people were identified to be vulnerable and food insecure sue to the impacts of the pandemic. Overall, the assessments so far undertaken by the sector in Lusaka, Kitwe, Kafue and Livingstone districts indicate that 322,074 people in 64,415 households are food insecure and in need of food assistance.

The Schools’ Readiness and Accountability Monitoring (SCREAM) was released by the Ministry of General Education (MOGE). The survey was conducted by ZANEC, ZOCS and UNICEF. The monitoring covered 500 country schools, including 75 per cent public, 11 per cent private and 4 per cent community schools. Findings from the report stated that 78 per cent of schools had handwashing stations in every classroom. While only 36 per cent schools had flushable toilets and 67 per cent had latrines. Access to water pumps and boreholes varied among districts with Luapula and Copperbelt provinces scoring less than 10 per cent. In terms of adherence to public health measures, schools scores were high for social distancing in the classroom ranked at 98 per cent and availability of masks for students and teachers at 88 per cent. The report further highlighted the challenges of distance learning and lack of infrastructure for students to engage in online and technology depended learning platforms and further emphasized the importance to reopen schools to mitigate against the loss in learning especially the most vulnerable pupils and most disadvantaged areas. Ongoing monitoring of school compliance to public health measures is critical to the success of keeping schools open.

African Migratory Locusts (AML) outbreaks are still affecting in Namibia, Botswana, Zambia and Zimbabwe. The 2020/21 forecasted la Niña event could accelerate the reproduction of the AML in the affected areas and increase the threat it poses to crops, grazing and livelihoods. In Zambia, where 472,540 hectares have been affected, already 100,900 hectares have been surveyed, including 20,170 hectares sprayed. The Zambia Ministry of Agriculture established a crisis technical team to respond to the AML currently reported in 10 districts in the south-west of the country.

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Zambia

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Education

35,300
children fed in school feeding programmes
555K
pupils targeted

Needs

  • Nation-wide school closure since March resulted in disruption of learning for more than 4.4 million children and adolescents and the provision of critical services to millions of children and youth, including school feeding programs for disadvantaged children.

  • Teachers also faced unprecedented challenges of ensuring the continuity of learning for their pupils while caring for their own and their families’ safety.

  • Prolonged school closure puts children, especially girls, at increased risk of teenage pregnancy, sexual abuse, child marriage and other harmful practices.

  • Many schools in the rural area are under-resourced and ill-equipped to provide support to the students learning at home and parents are unable to support children’s learning, widening the equity gap between the well-off and worse-off in learning, potentially leading to life-long negative impact.

  • The Ministry of General Education (MoGE) COVID-19 Response and Recovery Plan highlights the continuity of learning as its core priority and presents a series of education delivery options and strategies.

  • The Schools’ Readiness and Accountability Monitoring (SCREAM) was released by the Ministry of General Education (MOGE). The survey was conducted by ZANEC, ZOCS and UNICEF. The monitoring covered 500 country schools, including 75 per cent public, 11 per cent private and 4 per cent community schools. Findings from the report stated that 78 per cent of schools had handwashing stations in every classroom. While only 36 per cent schools had flushable toilets and 67 per cent had latrines. Access to water pumps and boreholes varied among districts with Luapula and Copperbelt provinces scoring less than 10 per cent. In terms of adherence to public health measures, schools scores were high for social distancing in the classroom ranked at 98 per cent and availability of masks for students and teachers at 88 per cent. The report further highlighted the challenges of distance learning and lack of infrastructure for students to engage in online and technology depended learning platforms and further emphasized the importance to reopen schools to mitigate against the loss in learning especially the most vulnerable pupils and most disadvantaged areas. Ongoing monitoring of school compliance to public health measures is critical to the success of keeping schools open.

Response

  • More that 35,300 (17,052 boys and 18,029 girls) learners in Gwembe and Shangombo districts received food through school feeding program.

  • Started airing of COVID-19 prevention messages through community radio stations in Southern and Western provinces.

  • In collaboration with MOGE, sector partners started implementation of education response program in 20 districts of 5 provinces funded by Global Partnership for Education (GPE).

  • Partners supported the preparation of schools on literacy and numeracy in 31 districts and reaching 300,000 children of grades 3-5 by MoGE and VVOB.

  • Broadcasting of radio lessons by MoGE with partners’ support. The content of educational programs for grades 1-4 is in the process of recording in 3-4 local languages. Recording of the lessons for the grades 5-7 is completed.

  • Sector partners supported the distribution of 15,310 stories to primary schools and 20,926 stories to Reading Camps to support continued literacy learning.

  • The sector partners trained more than 200 teachers on Instructional Leadership through Zoom, WhatsApp and MS Teams platforms.

  • Conducted Schools’ Readiness and Accountability Monitoring (SCREAM) by ZANEC, ZOCS and UNICEF. The monitoring covered 500 country schools, including 75 per cent public, 11 per cent private and 4 per cent community schools. The findings of monitoring covered the access of schools to COVID- 19 guidelines, access and conditions of WASH facilities, adherence to key public health measures, enrollment of learners after re-opening of examination classes, knowledge on actions in case of COVID-19 suspected cases and negative impact of staying at home, type of support provided by teachers, benefits and challenges of distance learning by the teachers and learners, etc. The results have been shared with MoGE and members of Education Working Group.

  • Launched the digital library of educational resources.

  • Sector partners continued to MoGE implementation of its COVID-19 Response and Recovery Plan through mobilization of their financial resources and technical expertise.

Gaps

  • Lack of teachers’ capacity on distance and alternative education.

  • Lack of communication infrastructure and electricity coverage.

  • Difficulty in remotely monitoring of learners during school closure. Need of systematic information on monitoring.

  • Need of systematic monitoring and information gathering on the situation in schools after re-opening of schools in country on adherence to public health measures and ongoing challenges.

  • Absence of empirical data, including disaggregated data on children and schools per area, age and type of interventions and information on children’s access to education through different modalities (TV, radio, e-learning, self-study materials).

  • Importance of remedial learning and catch-up classes tailored to the level of children’s ability/understanding after opening of school.

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Zambia

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Health

16,325
COVID-19 cases (as of 29 October)
5M
people targeted

Needs

  • The country has recorded an increase in respiratory/pneumonia classified health facility infections. There is need to amplify facility testing though there is a dwindling testing capacity due to inadequate laboratory supplies and health commodities insecure due to strained funding of routine health services.

  • Community deaths still being recorded which may be indicative of gaps in health seeking behavior and inadequate community and event-based surveillance system. There is a need to roll out of the thrird edition integrated disease surveillance strategy to build and maintain a functional and resilient public health security system.

  • The profile of severe illness is still significant, with a high number of cases needing oxygen and life support.

  • Inadequate technical support and capacity building to the subnational levels in IMS and emergency preparedness and response.

  • The national laboratory testing capacity is still low and unsteady, with major daily changes in total tests performed. The lab system still experiences inadequate laboratory supplies with half the testing sites not performing testing as the supplies used in the platforms are out of stock.

  • The field teams responsible for surveillance, case investigation and contact tracing are inadequate and fatigued affecting the quality and rate of work.

  • In-depth gap analysis of critical diagnostics and life-saving essential health commodities including sustained and smooth provisions of oxygen therapy services at hospital to further improve the case management for COVID-19 .

  • Continued capacity building of Health Workers (HWs) and community-based response teams is needed.

  • Need to sustain the continuity of essential health services and enhance monitoring of the consequences of COVID-19 on essential health services is critical of providing required support on time to effectively respond to broader health sector response through integrating into the routine HMIS with identifying and reporting on a number of critical core indicators regularly on certain interval.

Response

  • -he sector continued supporting the government to procure and distribute supplies and commodities required for COVID-19 response in the areas of diagnostics, PPE and clinical management.

  • Sector partners continued to provide support to COVID-19 field operations countrywide including: donation of 200 units of foot operated hand washing stations; provision of six vehicles to the sub-districts in Lusaka district to facilitate transport of responders during field operations; reviewing response updates daily and providing technical guidance to the response teams; supporting operations in the two national call centers through hiring of call center personnel; providing technical in the areas of surveillance, contact tracing, monitoring IPC compliance in health facilities, academic institutions and public places.

  • Sector partners supported the MOH/ZNPHI Intra Action Review conducted on 22 -25 September a critical reflection of the COVID-19 responses to date.

  • Sector partners delivered traditional vaccines (BCG, bOPV, Td and MR) for the entire country’s three-month requirement. Procurement orders for another six-month requirement has been placed including the procurement of a total of 2,815 UN Inter-agency Emergency Health Kit (IEHK-2017) for basic curative treatment and essential maternal, newborn and child health (RMNCH) services.

  • Supported the stabilization of oxygen therapy supplies through the rehabilitation of Oxygen Plants in University Teaching Hospital (UTH) that will improve and ensure smooth availability of oxygen therapy to support the life-saving treatment of patients with COVID-19 and other respiratory diseases. The rehabilitation of Oxygen Plants in UTH Lusaka was completed and is now operational, while work will begin for Mansa General Hospital in Luapula and Lewanika General Hospital in Mongu is ongoing.

  • Widened the involvement of partners support the assessment and improvement of agencies supported multi-agency efforts to assess and strengthen delivery systems for oxygen and other life support supplies.

  • Procured and delivered 519,950 surgical masks, 1.3 million pairs of gloves, 266 sets of oxygen concentrators and 5,500 COVID-19 test kits (6880 Cobas and Gene-Xpert) to perform 10,000 tests. Both Cobas and Gene-Xpert kits to conduct another 30,000 tests are in the pipeline, while procurement orders for another 58,000 tests on three platforms (Cobas, Gene-Xpert and Tagpath) have been placed.

  • Supported the last mile distribution of essential health commodities in Western Province. Oriented 25 health-care providers in infection prevention and control in Western Province; supported the delivery of dignity kits and hand-washing buckets in Luapula, Western and Northwestern provinces to cover maternity wings and GBV centers; monitored Sexual Reproductive Health Response (SRHR) activities for service delivery in response to COVID-19 pandemic in Lukulu District; mentorship of HCPs in EmONC Service provision; developed and disseminated multimedia campaign messages on COVID-19 for young people in Western province; produced four jingles and four posters and trained 91 Community Based Distributors (CBDs) and Healthcare Providers in 16 districts of Western Province in provision of the Family Planning method mix in the context of COVID. The CBDs and HCPs were provided with IPC materials.

  • Sector partners donated Essential Reproductive Health Commodities to the MOH which included IUDs (12 months of stocks), DMPA SC (2.5 months of stock), Combined Oral Contraceptives (6 months of stock), Noristerat (2.2 months of stock) worth US$2.1 million .

  • Continued support in the expansion of Levy Mwanawasa Hospital Bed Capacity from 300 to 800 through the connection of power supply by Zesco at a cost of $225,865.85 .

  • The health sector partners reinforced community awareness through community engagement activities across refugee settlements reaching over 90,000 refugees (45,900 female: 44,100 male) and host community members. Trained 20 CHWs (11male; 9 female) 45 CHWs (24 male; 21 female), 60 Community Protection workers (26 male: 34 female) and 60 community leaders in Mayukwayukwa Settlement on COVID-19.

Gaps

  • Low confidence in community continued in the use of health facilities for routine health care .

  • Inadequate stocks of Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) in health-care facilities and short supply of IPC facilities in the health care facilities compounded with inadequate adherence to IPC recommendations by health workers .

  • Lack of a comprehensive service delivery monitoring framework.

  • Poor logistics management system resulting in delayed restock processes.

  • Inadequate laboratory supplies to match the laboratory testing needs.

  • Lack of a well-defined COVID-19 testing strategy emphasizing both on the supply chain management of testing kits, the establishment and strengthening of the laboratory set-up and systems with sub-national level decentralized laboratory services capacity on COVID-19 in line with MoH recent directives of conducting 1000 tests per day .

  • Low compliance of the community to recommended public health measures is still evident. There is need for intensified RCCE with enforcement of the measures by all sectors. RCCE will need to be decentralized and supported by multi-channel, multisectoral approach backed-up by strong policy advocacy and evidence-based locally contextualized community mobilization interventions to address the stigma and skepticism.

  • Low levels of capacity building in human resources .

  • Inadequate isolation capacity in some districts especially those furthest from provincial headquarters.

  • Research is needed to understand and learn lessons on the COVID-19 pandemic in Zambia .

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Zambia

Situation Report

Sector Status

Food Security

1M
people targeted
322K
people targeted for cash-based assistance

Needs

  • Even though the Government has relaxed the COVID-19 containment measures, their effects have already spurred far reaching impacts on the country’s socioeconomic conditions and the livelihoods of many vulnerable and low-income people in urban and peri-urban settings, limiting their ability to meet their food and nutrition needs.

  • Following another rapid food security assessment conducted by the sector in the urban districts of Livingstone and Kitwe to ascertain the impacts of COVID-19 on livelihoods and food security among urban populations, whose report is currently under technical review, preliminary results indicate that 131,279 people (26,256 households) residing in 45 high density and low-income urban areas were food insecure due to the impacts of COVID-19 and in need of humanitarian assistance. This was after a similar assessment was done in Lusaka and Kafue districts in which 190,000 people were identified to be vulnerable and food insecure on account of the impacts of the pandemic. Overall, the assessments so far undertaken by the sector in Lusaka, Kitwe, Kafue and Livingstone districts indicate that 322,074 people (64,415 households) are food insecure and in need of food assistance.

Response

  • As part of continued implementation of its COVID-19 response targeting populations impacted by the pandemic, on 3 September, the sector completed the second batch of the emergency cash transfer (ECT) payments in Lusaka and Kafue districts, reaching 36,311 households (181,555 people), above the target of 36,011 households. A total of 143 were refugee households were among those reached, with a population of 715 people. Cumulatively, the sector distributed a total of 1,600 ZMW (approximately US$88) via mobile money services to each family to cover their needs for four months, and to allow them to purchase food in bulk and also avoid overcrowding at pay points as well in markets. The sector is implementing the ECT for six months from July 2020.

  • In preparation for the roll out of the ECT in Kitwe and Livingstone districts, the sector, working together with the Ministry of Community Development (MCDSS) has started verifying the 26,256 food insecure and vulnerable households. The verification exercise is aimed at ensuring that the right households benefit from the emergency response.

  • The sector is also making preparations for the roll out of the ECT in Chililabombwe District in October, targeting 1,237 households (6,185 people), with each household expected to receive ZMW 1,200 (about US$66) to meet their needs for three months.

  • The sector continued to coordinate with other UN agencies and the MCDSS, Ministry of Labour and Social Security, and local non-governmental organizations to promote awareness on cash redemption among the beneficiary households in Lusaka and Kafue districts. Consensus from the stakeholder meetings has necessitated the need of revisiting the communication engagement strategies in order to explore and leverage other ways of engaging the targeted households for effective communication.

  • In addition to the assessments conducted in the four districts between 2 and 9 September, the sector conducted a cash, market and needs assessment in Chililabombwe District, in Copperbelt Province, to ascertain the impacts of COVID-19 on livelihoods, and to inform decisions on the targeting of 3,059 vulnerable households. Data analysis is currently ongoing.

Gaps

  • While the sector requires $48.9 million to implement COVID-19 Food Security Response, it has so far raised $11 million. Following subsequent assessments by the sector, the ECT needs for the four districts (Lusaka, Kafue, Kitwe and Livingstone) are expected to be met with the current confirmed contributions.

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Zambia

Situation Report

Sector Status

Nutrition

60,783
severely acute malnourished children
1.7M
people targeted

Needs

  • Nationally, severe acute malnutrition (SAM) programme coverage is still low, 43 per cent compared to 70 per cent national target, and the cure rate still at 65 per cent compared to the 75 per cent national target.

  • National estimated SAM prevalence is 1.5 per cent, with an estimated SAM burden of 133,902. Estimated SAM cases are 60,783 and 131,962 expected MAM cases. Children with SAM are nine times more likely to die than well-nourished children.

  • Health worker and volunteers capacity to provide SAM management and IYCF counselling on prevention and treatment interventions remains low at facility and community levels. Currently, less than 50 per cent are trained against a target of 80 per cent .

  • There is need to scale up promotion and protection of the key recommendations for infant feeding and protecting breastfeeding in the context of COVID-19.

  • Lack of availability on the new SOPs for COVID-19 at health facility level, leading to non-implementation of the new COVID-19 SOPs at health facility level in Eastern province.

  • Strengthening of technical and financial support to Ministry of Health in rolling out IMAM programme in drought and COVID-19-affected districts

Response

  • In collaboration with the Provincial Health Officers (PHO) and District Health Officers (DHOs), sector partners started the trainings of volunteers and health workers on the management of SAM and Infant Young Child Feeding (IYCF).

  • Partners conducted orientation of 358 health workers (215 female, 143 male) representing 50 facilities in four districts of Eastern Province on COVID-19 Standard Operating Procedures and correct use of PPE.

  • Procured and distributed 180 boxes of surgical masks 750 Packs of KN95 Masks, 180 cases of handwashing and 180 hand sanitizers in the 11 districts in Eastern, Western, Southern, Lusaka provinces to prevent and mitigate COVID-19 at nutrition services delivery points (facilities and outreach sites). Procured and distributed 500 re-usable branded face masks to 250 health workers. Procured and distributed 2,400 re-usable masks for 690 health workers and 690 volunteers involved in Growth Monitoring and Promotion (GMP) and Nutrition screening at community level in 138 health facilities in 11 targeted districts.

  • In six of the targeted districts in Western province, sector partners enhanced the capacities of MOH personnel to provide IMAM services and treatment services in 72 health facilities, with orientation of 120 health workers, 500 community health volunteers in IMAM. A total of 25,000 children under five were screened for SAM and reached through the programme. Caregivers of children under five with SAM are being supported with IYCF counselling in the six districts.

  • NGOs, in coordination with MoH, supported the distribution of RUTF from district level to various health facilities that needed replenishment and pre-positioning ahead of the rainy season.

  • Monitoring and evaluation tools were distributed in health facilities in the 58 targeted districts to enable health facilities collect and input data on nutrition. Orientation of monitoring and evaluation tools including capacity building on nutrition data management conducted in Eastern, Western, Central provinces including Copperbelt district targeting MoH and NGOs data management staff to increase reporting rate and data quality.

  • Coordinated monitoring trips conducted with MoH and NGOs to targeted health facilities in the districts.

  • Pallets were distributed to various health facilities to ensure proper storage of RUTF and nutrition supplies.

Gaps

  • Only 58 districts have consistent stocks of RUTF, with the rest of the country without RUTF to manage SAM children. Nationally, more than 50 per cent of facilities are without therapeutic feeds due to funding constraints.

  • There is need to consider programme adaptations such as Family MUAC for early identification and self-referrals of wasted children especially in high risk COVID-19 districts.

  • Poor terrain, areas in islands and long distances pose a significant challenge especially in Western province increasing the costs of the programme. Some health facilities and communities are in hard to reach areas and expected to be completely inaccessible and cut off during the rainy season. This could hamper delivery of supplies, outreach services, supervision and monitoring.

  • Very few or no livelihood, WASH or school feeding activities taking place in the catchment areas of health facilities, which would complement the IMAM programme .

  • The current nutrition project budget is limited and not enough to cover 100 per cent capacity building for health workers and volunteers in the target districts and can only cover 50 per cent of health facilities in six districts in western province targeted by people in need.

  • There is need for continued provision of PPEs for health workers and community volunteers for service delivery at facility level and to strengthen community outreach services.

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Zambia

Situation Report

Sector Status

Protection (GBV and Child Protection)

26,759
people received psychosocial support
296k
people targeted

Needs

  • Vulnerable women and girls infected with COVID-19 need access to menstrual hygiene products.

  • Increasing number of malnutrition cases among children of under age 5 and among pregnant and lactating women during the COVID-19 pandemic calls for increased support towards supplementary feeding programs in all health facilities to include groundnuts, cooking, beans, sugar etc. to avert health risks of malnutrition in Maheba settlement .

  • Reduced income due to COVID-19 pandemic is ontributing to an increased exposure to risks of survival sex in Maheba settlement .

  • Limited supply of masks, sanitizers, soap, hand basins and buckets at schools, safe haven, for children in group living and the health information centre (safe house for SGBV survivors) in Maheba settlement.

  • Limited mental health and psychosocial support and counselling services and safe space for residents of Maheba settlement .

  • Chaisa refugee community center in Lusaka lacks access to handwashing amenities to support them in COVID-19 prevention.

Response

  • Sector partners donated PPEs and IPC to MOH for distribution in high volume facilities in Lusaka, Central, Northwestern, Luapula and Western Provinces. To ensure continuity of services especially for GBV and SRH in the health facilities, 55,720 items were including: disposal gowns, coverall suits, examination gloves, surgical gloves, surgical mask type 1, surgical mask type 2, goggles, heavy duty gloves, liquid disinfectant, alcohol base hand rub, chlorine granules, hand drying tissue, disposable bags, sharp boxes, face shields, and handwashing buckets with stands.

  • Over 26,759 people, including 10,957 children and 15,792 parents and primary caregivers were provided with community based mental health and psychosocial support.

  • A total of 441 sector partners completed training on GBV risk mitigation and referrals for the survivors, including PSEA .

  • A total of 14,318 children and adults accessed a safe and accessible channels to report sexual exploitation and abuse.

  • Child friendly sessions were held at George, Chawama, Kanyama and Chaisa outreach centres in Lusaka. New recreational materials were procured by the implementing partner World Vision Zambia which include books, bikes and board games.

  • Community awareness raising on SGBV referral pathways amid the COVID-19 pandemic was conducted in the four outreach centres in Lusaka, information on preventive measures for the pandemic was incorporated. A total of 163 refugees were reached.

  • Increased monitoring during children’s clinics such as under-five clinic, Maternal Child Health clinics, Family Planning and during outreach programs by RHMs and CHW .

  • Increased monitoring of unaccompanied and separated children and those in alternative care arrangements e.g. Safe Haven by MCDSS Isibindi community youth care workers.

  • Integration of COVID-19 messages in increased sensitizations and awareness activities/trainings at community level through existing structures by Zero Tolerance Village Alliance -SGBV.

  • Continued to conduct open air trainings to promote social distancing.

  • Continued to facilitate appointment of guardians by MCDSS for children in need .

  • COVID-19 posters were distribution in schools and public places .

  • COVID-19 cash grants to refugees both in Lusaka and settlements.

Gaps

  • Limited available space in Lusaka community outreach centers for refugees has affected community awareness programs in reaching out to the planned audiences in terms of numbers.

  • It has been difficult for some children to open or disclose their issue during child counselling because of lack child friendly facilities.

  • COVID-19 restrictions especially on gatherings delayed some cases to court concluded on time.

  • Inadequate health related supplementary feeding programmes.

  • Inadequate nutrition programs to support nutrition challenges among under-five children and pregnant and lactating women.

  • Lack of recreation and child friendly equipment in Mayukwayukwa settlement.

  • Lack of staffing with a social welfare background .

  • Inadequate masks and hygiene promotion material .

  • IGA support for women to mitigate against harmful coping measures.

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Zambia

Situation Report

Sector Status

Social Protection/ Multisectoral Cash

118K
people targeted with ZMK400 per person

Needs

  • Estimated 7.6 million people nationally are affected directly and indirectly by the COVID-19, especially in terms of the socio-economic and cultural impacts and the Government’s responses to COVID-19.

  • An estimated 1.2 million people in urban and per-urban settlements are extremely poor and vulnerable with poor access to health, alternative learning options for their children, limited income-earning opportunities and overall low access to key services.

Response

  • A COVID-19 Emergency Cash Transfer Programme document has been finalized in collaboration with the UN, donors and Ministry of Community Development and Social Services (MCDSS). The programme document has now been incorporated into the existing UN Joint Programme on Social Protection (UNJPSP) under the shock-responsive social protection outcome.

  • Bilateral discussions with donors (Sweden, DFID, Ireland, KfW and EU) are being formalized and preparatory work (payment delivery mechanism, grievance and redress mechanisms and agreements with mobile network operators) is underway with transfer payments to beneficiaries expected to begin in August 2020.

  • Cross-sectoral coordination with the food security sector—where a cash-based food security transfer is also being planned—has taken place to ensure consistency in transfer values, targeting approaches, communication and coordination for the avoidance of confusion among beneficiaries.

  • Linkages between the emergency cash transfers and nutrition, WASH, health, disability and child protection have also been established and incorporated in the overall COVID-19 social protection response.

  • The vertical and horizontal targeting protocols have been finalized and the ECT programme was officially launched by the Government on the 28 July.

Gaps

  • There is still an unmet need of 400,000 people who are extremely vulnerable in urban and peri-urban areas. Current funding from commitments and pledges will still not meet the full 1,200,000 people extremely vulnerable.

  • Government fiscal resources for social protection has also been stagnant, with only ZMK 20 million (approximately $1,101,313) released from treasury to the MCDSS for the social protection response.

  • Funding commitments have taken longer than expected as contribution negotiations are still on-going with donor partners.

  • Intra and inter-sectoral coordination has been challenging at times due to different approaches, targeting methods and transfer values .

  • Capacity at district level to respond quickly to additional beneficiaries that are currently not registered on the Social Cash Transfer (SCT) programme is inadequate, creating possible time delays.

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Zambia

Situation Report

Sector Status

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

4.6M
reached with hygiene messages
1.6M
people targeted

Needs

  • According to Zambia Demographic and Health Survey (ZDHS) - 2018, more than 36 per cent of Zambia’s population lacked access to basic drinking water services while more than 67 per cent lacked access to basic sanitation services in 2018. An estimated 10 per cent of the population practiced open defecation while 76 per cent of households did not have access to a handwashing facility with soap and water in 2018.

  • Lack of adequate WASH services may pose serious challenge for effective prevention and control of COVID-19. For effective COVID-2019 response, it is, therefore, critical not only to sustain the existing water, sanitation and hygiene services but also scale-up these to reach the un-served and under-served vulnerable population, as well as meet the increased demand.

  • Against the above backdrop, the WASH response is meant to contribute to GRZ’s wider efforts aimed at reduction of exposure to and prevention of the human to human transmission of COVID-19 through strengthening IPC and sustaining and scale-up of WASH services and promotion of appropriate hygiene behaviors.

  • The critical needs in the WASH Sector include strengthening of WASH and infection prevention and control (IPC) measures in the health care facilities and schools; improvement and continuity of water supply to vulnerable communities, especially in the rural and high-density urban areas; provision of critical supplies including soap and handwashing stations to vulnerable populations and hygiene promotion together with infection prevention and control messaging .

Response

  • As parts of efforts to support continuity of water supply services, delivery of critical water treatment chemicals to 11 commercial utilities that serve over 6 million people in the urban and peri-urban areas have commenced. These chemicals would meet the needs of the commercial utilities for at least three months and include 822 tons of aluminum sulphate, 258 tons of chlorine gas, 226 tons of granular chlorine, 55 tons of Zeta Floc, 18320 cartridges of chlorine tablets, 2 tons of sulphuric acid, 4 tons of calcium chloride, 18,000 cartridges of chlorine tablets, 51 tons of poly aluminum chloride, and 7 tons of High Test Hypochlorite (HTH) pellets.

  • A total of 118 health-care facilities and COVID-19 treatment centres benefitted from WASH and IPC improvement measures in Chongwe and Sinazongwe districts as well as other districts in Muchinga, Northern, Luapula, Central, Eastern, Southern, Copperbelt, Western and North Western Provinces.

  • A total of 267 health-care facility staff and community health workers were trained in IPC in Samfya, Mwense, Monze, Livingstone, Mwandi, Kazungula and other districts in Muchinga, Northern, Luapula, Central, Eastern, Southern, Copperbelt, Western and North Western Provinces.

  • Approximately 2,520 people were reached with safe water in Luangwa and Sinazongwe districts.

  • Approximately 1,884 people were reached with improved sanitation in Lusaka district.

  • A total of 24 schools benefited from hygiene supplies, including handwashing stations, soap and hand sanitisers, in Lusaka, Sinazongwe and Chongwe districts.

  • About 15,300 vulnerable people were provided soap and/or other critical WASH supplies, in different districts in Muchinga, Northern, Luapula, Central, Eastern, Southern, Copperbelt, Western and North Western Provinces.

  • A total of 1,554,469 people were reached with messages on safe hygiene practices in different districts in Lusaka, Muchinga, Northern, Luapula, Central, Eastern, Southern, Copperbelt, Western and North Western Provinces.

Gaps

  • Planned activities to support for the improvement and continuity of WASH services have not yet started due to funding gaps.

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Zambia

Situation Report

Sector Status

Risk Communication and Community Engagement

28K
monthly calls on COVID-19 received
4M
people targeted

Needs

At the backdrop of significant community transmission, rapid increase in brought in dead (BID) cases, low compliance to public health measures such as physical distancing, using masking and hand hygiene, there is increased need to engage the community to build trust and address misconceptions.

A recent phone in study on Health & COVID-19 Mitigation conducted between June-July by Innovation for Poverty Action (IPA), highlighted the following community concerns:

  • About 10 per cent of respondents say they delayed or skipped needed health-care visits since mid-March. Over 50 per cent of respondents say they delayed or skipped needed health-care visits due to concerns about COVID-19 .

  • Over 25 per cent of respondents say they never stayed home in the past week.

  • Almost 80 per cent of respondents say they washed their hands more often this week than before mid-March and have worn a cloth face mask in the past week. Women are more likely than men to stay at home.

  • Almost 40 per cent of respondents say they feel their household is at risk of contracting COVID-19. For those who do not feel at risk, over 80 per cent of respondents say that it is because they are following preventive measures.

  • Almost 60 per cent of respondents say their main concern related to the effects of the coronavirus crisis on Zambians is lack of money.

Response

  • To address the current situation of increased community transmission, a re-branded strategic initiative was launched by MOH to encourage the community take a more center stage to halt the progress of the epidemic.

  • RCCE partners supported a community-based campaign in response to the strategic focus intended to reach about 2 million people in Lusaka, strategically targeting the markets, households in the compounds, bus terminals and other public places, to promote public adherence to good practices to keep well and safe, including handwashing promotion. The campaign engages 50 public announcers and 200 community-based volunteers to reach the target population, including the vulnerable.

  • Over 2,000 advocacy brochures were printed, and another 10,000 development and printing of low literacy brochures are in the pipeline to support the campaign.

  • RCCE partners are engaging chiefs and village heads in 209 Chiefdoms in advocacy meetings across the country including distribution of revised IEC materials.

  • RCCE support is also increasingly being picked up by high-level policy makers, especially the Minister of Health through frequent meetings with faith leaders, highlighting community influencers participation in the Ministers’ Press briefing to build trust on the public measures.

  • High level collaboration with inspectoral ministers continued through the policymakers.

  • IEC materials and recorded public service announcements (PSA) in flash drives was distributed for use in long & short distance buses through the Ministry of Transport and Communication.

  • The Social Listening, June-July report has been cleared which focuses on community perceptions on use of masks, the notion that “the worst had passed” etc. The report is being widely shared among many platforms.

  • The mapping of communication initiatives with GRID 3 (an interactive community engagement mapping dashboard) is being rolled out in Lusaka with a newly constructed dashboard and online survey tools.

  • Efforts are underway to strengthen the scope and capacity of the Call Centre as it continues to reach 28,000 monthly calls on average.

  • RCCE sector partners continues to support a COVID-19 radio show on the country’s major commercial radio station, and other community radio stations, including with interviews with partners advocating on COVID-19 prevention for disabled persons and to challenge the stigmatization of COVID-19 survivors.

Gaps

  • To intensify RCCE activities across 10 provinces additional capacities and resources are required.

  • Lack of public trust and adherence to public health measures will require time and efforts

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Zambia

Situation Report
Coordination

General Coordination

In May, the Government of Zambia COVID-19 Multisectoral Contingency & Response Plan. The UN and partners developed the the COVID-19 Emergency Appeal in line with Government’s Multisectoral Plan, was officially launched by the Vice President Inonge Wina. The UN and partners’ Appeal requires $132.9 million to support the COVID-19 multisectoral response targeting 6.2 million people.

WHO continues as the technical co-lead agency supporting the Ministry of Health and Zambia Public Health Institute (ZNPHI) overall coordination of the COVID-19 response. The United Nations Resident Coordinators Office is co-leading UN response across with line ministries as lead and UN agencies co-leading sector responses.

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