Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Highlights

  • As of 13 September, 7, 526 COVID-19 cases and 224 deaths were confirmed, with 89 per cent in Harare, Bulawayo, Matabeleland South, Midlands, Mashonaland East and Manicaland.
  • From 1 April to 13 September, 18,459 Zimbabwean migrants returned from neighbouring countries, with over 764 returnees still being quarantined.
  • Access to essential health services has decreased due to insufficient health workers, health workers in quarantine, insufficient PPE, and user fees in health facilities.
  • COVID-19 containment measures continue to have severe socio-economic consequences with loss of livelihoods expected to trigger an increase in food insecurity across the country.
Zimbabwe: WFP
A group of people stand in food distribution lines in Chimanimani District. Photo: WFP

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Key Figures

7M
people in need
5.6M
people targeted
47
partners operational

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Funding

$800.8M
Required
$158.4M
Received
20%
Progress
FTS

URL:

Downloaded:

Contacts

Wouter De Cuyper

Humanitarian Affairs Officer, Zimbabwe

Guiomar Pau Sole

Head of Communications & Information Management, Regional Office for Southern & Eastern Africa

Zimbabwe

Situation Report
Background

Situation Overview

The United Nations and humanitarian partners revised the Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) in July to update the response to the COVID-19 outbreak integrating a multisectoral migrant response and reprioritizing humanitarian cluster responses. The updated COVID-19 Addendum requires US$85 million to respond to the immediate public health crisis and the secondary impacts of the pandemic on vulnerable people, in addition to the $715 million required in the HRP.

The 2020 Zimbabwe Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP), launched on 2 April 2020, indicates that 7 million people in urban and rural areas are in urgent need of humanitarian assistance across Zimbabwe, compared to 5.5 million in August 2019. Since the launch of the Revised Humanitarian Appeal in August 2019, circumstances for millions of Zimbabweans have worsened. Drought and crop failure, exacerbated by macro-economic challenges and austerity measures, have directly affected vulnerable households in both rural and urban communities. Inflation continues to erode purchasing power and affordability of food and other essential goods is a daily challenge. The delivery of health care, clean water and sanitation, and education has been constrained and millions of people are facing challenges to access vital services.

There are more than 4.3 million people severely food insecure in rural areas in Zimbabwe, according to the latest Intergrated Food Security Phase Classification (IPC) analysis, undertaken in February 2020. In addition, 2.2. million people  in urban areas, are “cereal food insecure”, according to the most recent Zimbabwe Vulnerability Assessment Committee (ZimVAC) analysis with a new ZimVAC assessment conducted between 10 and 21 July 2020. WFP projections indicate that the number of food insecure Zimbabweans is likely to increase by almost 50 per cent by the end of 2020. About 8.6 million people, including 5.3 million people in rural areas and 3.3 million people in urban areas, or 60 per cent of the population is expected be food insecure due to the combined effects of drought, economic recession and the COVID-19 pandemic. In addition, locust damage to crops are expected to compound existing food insecurity in communities.

Nutritional needs remain high with over 1.1 million children and women requiring nutrition assistance. Child malnutrition, including acute malnutrition or wasting, is also expected to increase due to steep declines in household incomes, changes in the availability and affordability of nutritious foods, and interruptions to health, nutrition, and social protection services. The impact of COVID-19 is likely to result in at least an additional 15,000 children been wasted, in addition to the 100,000 children expected to be wasted this year.In addition, numbers of pellagra cases are likely to continue to increase as food insecurity in the country deepens and household income for accessing diversified diets continues to be depleted by the impact of COVID-19 lockdown and economic crisis.

At least 4 million vulnerable Zimbabweans are facing challenges accessing primary health care and drought conditions trigger several health risks. Decreasing availability of safe water, sanitation and hygiene have heightened the risk of communicable disease outbreaks for 3.7 million vulnerable people. Some 1.2 million school-age children are facing challenges accessing education. The drought and economic situation have heightened protection risks, particularly for women and children. Over a year after Cyclone Idai hit Zimbabwe in March 2019, 128,270 people remain in need of humanitarian assistance across the 12 affected districts in Manicaland and Masvingo provinces. There are 21,328 refugees and asylum seekers in Zimbabwe who need international protection and multisectoral life-saving assistance to enable them to live in safety and dignity.

As of 13 September 2020, Zimbabwe reported 6,678 confirmed COVID-19 cases (vs 6,6 78 on 3 September, 4,339 on 5 August; 926 on 9 July; and 287 on 10 June), including 224 deaths (vs 206 on 3 of September, 84 deaths on 5 August; 12 deaths on 9 July and 4 deaths on 10 June) since the onset of the outbreak. Of confirmed cases, 75 per cent are adults within the age range 21-50 years, with 45 per cent being female and 55 per cent male. After a decline in weekly incidence risk from 7.6 in week 31 (26 July-1 Augustus 2020) to 3.7 in week 33 (9-15 Augustus 2020), the weekly incidence risk increased to 4.4. in week 34 (16- 22 Aug 2020). The Incidence rate has continued to decline to 3,18 in week 35 but however increased again to 3.53 in week 36. As of 13 September 2020, the six provinces Harare, Bulawayo, Matabeleland South, Midlands, Mashonaland East and Manicaland account for 89 per cent of all confirmed COVID-19 cases in Zimbabwe. In order to strengthen the National COVID-19 response, the Government Cabinet decided on 18 August that a Technical Steering Committee with experts from all the sectors involved in the response will be constituted, and that the COVID-19 response is to be merged into a single response plan comprising the Command Centre, Office of the COVID-19 Chief Coordinator and Ministry of Health and Child Care. In addition to previously announced lockdown regulations, the postponement of the planned reopening of schools on 28 July and extra measures on 21 July, the Government Cabinet directed on 18 August that: business hours which were ending at 3 p.m. be revisited to end at 4:30 p.m. and the curfew to start at 8 p.m. instead of 6 p.m.; public transport drivers have to undergo regular COVID-19 PCR tests; and public transport buses will be allowed a dedicated lane at roadblocks to expedite their passage. A total of 18,459 migrants returned to Zimbabwe from neighbouring countries as of 13 September, with the large majority of returnees arriving through the three points of entry of Beitbridge border post, Plumtree and Harare International airport. The number continues to increase daily, with a projection of 20,000 new arrivals in the next coming months with inclusion of those from northern countries, such as Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, and Ethiopia. Further, 764 returnees were still quarantined in government operated centres on 13 September, with most returnees quarantined in the four provinces of Harare, Matabeleland South, Manicaland and Masvingo.

In addition to the commitments to the HRP recorded above through the Financial Tracking System (FTS), a number of pledges are in the process of being finalized, including $18 million from the United States, $14 million from the European Commission, $7.2 from the United Kingdom, and $200,000 from Canada. In addition, carryover funding of agencies from 2019 will be reflected in FTS.

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Camp Coordination and Camp Management / Shelter and NFIs

43,352
displaced pple in camps & host communities

Needs

  • More than 43,000 people remain displaced in camps and host communities. Out of the total number of IDPs, 198 Cyclone Idai-affected households (909 people) are living in four camps, where living conditions are exposing them to serious protection and health risks.

  • Tent conditions that have deteriorated with some worn out exposing IDPs to health risk. Food availability and accessibility remains a major challenge across all the three camps and with COVID-19 as IDP`s movement restrictions, livelihood activities have been seriously affected reliable sources of revenue.

  • There is an urgent need to support IDPs with livelihood activities, to be able to have a sustainable income.

  • Water access is a major concern since WASH facilities are deteriorating in the camps and surrounding communities.

  • IDPs in camps are facing water and livestock challenges, with cattle destroying sanitation facilities whilst goats feed on vegetables gardens.

  • Protection issues are on the raise, there is a need to assist with Mental Health and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) as well as to review the welfare issue of IDPs.

  • Those remaining in the camps and those affected and displaced people accommodated in host communities or in makeshift structures already worn out for the protracted crisis need shelter support.

  • Since the beginning of lockdown, Chipingue and Chimanimani District are the among the high migrant/ returnee receiving districts, with 11 active cases in the district and at least one positive case in one on the camps. There is a need to reinforce hygiene practice and health promotion in the camps to avoid the spread of the disease.

  • There is a need for advocacy with Government to strengthen community-based reporting structures/referral mechanisms to ensure migrants returning to IDPs communities are screened and not exposing already vulnerable people.

Response

  • Leading the Shelter/CCCM cluster, IOM has been advocating for durable solutions for displaced populations to ensure that basic needs of IDPs and host communities are addressed and included in the COVID-19 national response plan.

  • IOM is assisting already vulnerable communities and displaced populations from protracted crisis through a new shelter intervention that will assist IDPs in camps and host communities by ensuring appropriate housing space and decongestion of displacement sites with poor living conditions, to avoid the spread of the virus and provide a dignified way of living after over one year of displacement.

  • The Government of Zimbabwe is accelerating the preparation of land and services at the new relocation site in Vumba. Providing technical capacity to the Government, IOM is supporting the relocation process and assist with camp coordination and camp management ensuring that IDPs have access to basic services. The operationalization of the relocation plan is ongoing, with IOM supporting the Government to start constructions and ensure the relocation of IDPs before the next rainy season.

  • Free medical services are provided by WHO in Aboretum, Nyamatanda and Garikai IDP camps, and Kopa the informal camp, with routine exercises by a health team constituting of 1 doctor, 2 nurses, 1 pharmacist, 1 laboratory technician and 1 environmental health technician.

  • Miracle Mission distributed food hampers to 497 IDP households. The Ministry of Women Affairs supported three groups of IDPs living in camps with income generating projects of poultry and sewing machines at Aboretum and Nyamatanda IDP camps. IDPs in the camps are venturing in various income generating activities (IGAs) such as poultry, rabbitry, gardening, petty trading among other activities to cope with the economic challenges.

  • IOM held meetings with the IDP committee members from Aboretum, Nyamatanda and Garikai, to discuss needs and gaps in the assistance and ensure regular communication with Government authorities.

  • Feedback mechanisms and support lines are in the progress targeting in IDPs in camps and host communities to ensure feedback is facilitated and protection issues are addressed, and to guarantee accountability to affected populations (AAP).

Gaps

  • There is an urgent need to ensure IDPs have access to medical services and health facilities, and to increase mental health and psychosocial support (MHPSS) tailored for COVID-19 distress for IDPs and affected communities.

  • Reinforced surveillance needs to be strengthened through community leaders. There is need for more COVID-19 awareness campaigns in the camps to ensure communities are educated on health and preventive measures, particularly since there are now COVID-19 positive cases within the camps and surrounding communities are receiving migrants’ returnees, and the need to cope with the socio- economic impact and the loss of livelihoods resulting in increased cross border trading activities.

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Education

853K
children targeted
359,764
people reached under COVID-19 response

Needs

  • The education system in Zimbabwe was already stretched before the COVID-19 pandemic as a result of multiple crises, including the impact of Cyclone Idai last year, the economic crisis coupled with hyperinflation and the ongoing drought. Before the onset of the COVID-19 epidemic, estimates by the Education Cluster were that of the more than 3.4 million children of school going age (3 to 12 years), at least 1.2 million (35 per cent), would need emergency and specialized education services in 2020. This includes more than 853,000 children in acute need, such as: children not enrolled in school; orphans and other vulnerable children (OCV), including children with disabilities and children living with HIV; and those in need of school feeding.

  • The combined effect of the humanitarian crisis and the COVID-19 pandemic is expected to have far-reaching implications for the demand and supply of education services. While Zimbabwe closed schools on March 24, 2020 to contain the spread of COVID-19 and to protect school populations, school closures have disrupted the education of more than 4.6 million children, with adverse impacts on the protection and wellbeing of children as well as their readiness for school, attendance and participation in learning.

  • Prolonged school closures are likely to have a major and negative affect on children’s learning, physical, social and mental health and well-being threatening hard-won educational achievements for years to come. Prolonged school closures will likely exacerbate existing vulnerabilities and inequalities among children, especially girls, children with disabilities, those in rural areas, orphans and vulnerable children, as well as those from poor households and fragile families. School closures have the potential to widen learning disparities and increase the risk of some learners permanently dropping out of school.

  • While the Ministry of Primary and Secondary Education (MoPSE) successfully conducted June national examinations for Forms 4 and Form 6 from June 30, 2020 to July 23, 2020, the planned reopening of schools, which was tentatively scheduled for 28 July 2020, was postponed. In August, Cabinet announced schools will reopen for examination classes Grade 7, Form 4 and Form 6- from September 14, 2020 for those sitting for the Cambridge examination classes followed by classes for local Zimbabwe Schools Examination Council (ZIMSEC) examinations on September 28, 2020. Local ZIMSEC examinations are expected to begin on December 1, 2020.

Response

  • As of end of August 2020, a total of 105,252 people have benefited from various activities implemented by the cluster partners as part of the Humanitarian Response Planning 2020.

  • A total of 398,023 people have benefited from COVID-19 related activities related to the overall education cluster strategy and the Humanitarian Response Plan COVID-19 addendum for the period March to July 2020. Additionally, through support from different partners the following activities are currently ongoing at field level as parts of the efforts to combat the COVD-19 pandemic:

  • A total of 485 primary radio lessons have been developed with 323 lessons broadcasted as part of alternative learning through radio lessons.

  • UNICEF WASH section and implementing partners have repaired boreholes in seven schools and provided handwashing facilities to 74 schools reaching 121 schools with age-appropriate information, education, and communication (IEC) materials to strengthen infections prevention and control (IPC) measures in schools.

  • One partner is in the process of procuring 8,596 textbooks for 4,298 Children (both primary and secondary) in Makonde, Zvimba, Chegutu and Mhondoro-Ngezi districts. The textbooks will be key in facilitating home and community schooling for the vulnerable learners.

  • As part of the efforts to promote continuous learning, 5,404 children and caregivers were reached with parenting messages through the Sinovuyo Caring Families Programme for Parents and Teens sessions which were conducted virtually through phoning and SMS messages in Bulawayo.

  • To encourage participation in radio lessons, 3,199 learners received stationery to support their learning.

  • Support continues in Tongogara Refugee Camp through information dissemination to encourage refugee children to participate in lessons through community-based education volunteers on the national radio programmes. Information updates on radio lessons are passed through to refugee parents during food distribution.

  • One cluster partner is currently working towards alleviation of food insecurity through providing monthly food hampers to 6,132 orphan and vulnerable children Harare, Chitungwiza and Goromonzi districts. The beneficiaries received Corn-Soya Blend (porridge) and soap to use when washing hands as a mitigatory measure to fight COVID-19 .

  • COVID-19 awareness messaging continues with 12,345 caregivers reached with key awareness messaging through virtual platforms.

  • The cluster through its partner’s procured textbooks for 15,005 for primary and secondary school Orphans and Vulnerable Children to use while at home.

  • One cluster partner is in the process of procure simple smart phones capable of WhatsApp, Google, and radio reception for 8,319 learners to enable continuous learning .

  • One cluster partner is currently launching Grade 7 English and Mathematics study guides together with MOPSE out of which 57 schools have been reached so far.

  • The cluster, through one of its partner’s is helping to ensure education continues in the face of COVID-19 through mobile lessons with 1,725 ECD learners from 45 schools in Chimanimani and Chipinge districts having accessed and completed the lessons.

Gaps

  • Inadequate Funding to address the educational and protection needs induced by COVID-19: Despite numerous efforts, funding remains a challenge in the fight against COVID-19. To date, the cluster has only received 8 per cent% of its funding requests to address to prioritized critical needs the provision of teaching and learning materials to ensure the continuous learning and prepare for the reopening of schools.

  • Wrong beliefs that schools just provide academics has erroneously relegated education to a secondary national COVID-19 priority: Zimbabwe has prioritized critical needs such as health, water, and sanitation, above all other considerations. The beliefs that education is not lifesaving, that schools are for academics, which can be postponed, has left many children vulnerable, unprotected and exposed to risks like family violence and exploitation. To add to the challenge, fiscal constraints and resource challenges mean that the education of children at home, is not receiving adequate national resources. This represents a great constraint in response efforts, to detriment of the educational needs of children.

  • Macro-economic constraints: Zimbabwe’s fragile economy represents the greatest challenge in the fight against COVID-19. Economic decline has exacerbated the delivery of critical services such as health and the provision of water, which are critical ensuring the prevention of COVID-19. The rapidly depreciating local currency is forcing service providers to increase their prices, with negative implications for preparedness efforts as goods and services are rising each week. Poor public service delivery, and especially the shortage of medical personnel, continues to undermine the confidence of parents in efforts to reopen schools. While most parents are unable to buy learning materials to support learners at home or pay fees to support preparations for the reopening schools, schools face an increased financial burden to implement all the recommended measures to mitigate against the spread of the disease. Similarly, partners also face financial resource constraints to respond to the urgent and emergent learning needs of learners.

  • Unmet Needs for marginalized learners: While the Cluster has made significant progress in promoting continuous access to education, through the provision of materials and the development of radio lessons, the cluster has not been able to meet the learning needs of all children, especially children with disabilities, those living in the most remote areas without access to radio signals and children from poor households. These children continue to have unmet learning needs in part because of shortages of teaching and learning materials at home. To add to the challenge, the worsening food insecurity in most poor households represents a significant challenge, which has the potential to contribute to dropping out school .

  • Unmet needs for marginalized learners: While the Cluster has made significant progress in promoting continuous access to education, through the provision of materials and the development of radio lessons, the cluster has not been able to meet the learning needs of all children, especially children with disabilities, those living in the most remote areas without access to radio signals and children from poor households. These children continue to have unmet learning needs in part because of shortages of teaching and learning materials at home. To add to the challenge, the worsening food insecurity in most poor households represents a significant challenge, which has the potential to contribute to dropping out school.

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Food Security

4.6M
people targeted
600K
people received assistance in July

Needs

  • According to the 2020 Humanitarian Response Plan, a total of 6 million people are in urgent need of food assistance across Zimbabwe both in rural and urban areas. In addition, 1.5 million small holder farmers are in need of season- sensitive emergency crop and livestock input assistance.

  • The increased rural and urban caseload due to COVID-19 of 200,000 is bringing the total target to 4.6 million people, according to the HRP COVID-19 Addendum. A further revision of rural food assistance needs will be undertaken when data from the forthcoming assessments are available.

  • COVID-19 containment measures, in particular lockdowns, have severe socio-economic consequences. It is expected that the drastic loss of livelihoods will trigger a sharp increase in food insecurity across the country. WFP internal analysis forecasts that food insecure people will rise to 3.3 million from 2.2 million in urban areas, and to 5.3 million from 3.7 million in rural areas from October to December 2020.

  • According to the WFP August Food Security Outlook, generally prices of basic food items have plateaued and remained high since the high increases during the second quarter of 2020. Particularly prices in local currency payments have been increasing during 2020 by an average of 424 per cent with the lowest price change being recorded for maize grain at 383 per cent and the highest for sugar beans at 463 per cent. Further, food inflation was pegged at 977 per cent for July from 836 per cent in June 2020 and remains the main driver of inflation in the country.

Response

  • For the month of September, a total of 500,000 people were reached with either in kind food assistance, e-vouchers, or remittance companies in both rural and urban areas.

  • For the month of August, the FSL Cluster partners reported providing in-kind food assistance, vouchers, or cash in USD to a total of 745,000 people in both rural and urban zones. Further, a total of 150,000 people received food baskets either via e-vouchers or remittance companies in urban areas.

  • Southern African Development Community (SADC) is working with the FAO Sub-regional Office For Southern Africa (FAO SFS) and the International Red Locust Control Organization for Central and Southern Africa (IRLCO-CSA) to strengthen the capacity of affected countries and regional institutions to respond to the African Migratory Locust (AML) threat. FAO has provided $500, 000 through emergency Technical Cooperation Project TCP/SFS/380 project funding facility to support the response. The project will focus on strengthening the capacity of affected countries and regional institutions through 4 pillars.

  • The Ministry of Agriculture stated that an estimated 44,399 hectares has been planted for winter wheat with expected yield 100,000 metric tonnes. Most of the wheat crop is reported to be between the tiller formation and booting stages. The wheat condition is fair to good across all provinces.

  • According to the Southern Africa Climate Outlook Forum, there are higher chances for normal to above normal rainfall during the October to December 2020 period and normal to above normal rainfall during January to March 2021.

  • Zimbabwe’s major Food Security Assessment, ZimVAC, data collection has been finalized and the final report is expected by the end of September.

Gaps

  • According to FTS, only $100 million of the $490.5 million (22.6 per cent) total requested budget for the HRP 2020 was committed as of 02 September 2020, with 92 per cent of the HRP 2020 COVID-19 Addendum budget contributed which significantly helps to adapt the FSL activities to COVID-19.

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Health

3M
people targeted
5,745
COVID-19 cases (as of 20 August)

Needs

  • As of 13 September 2020, Zimbabwe reported 6,678 confirmed COVID-19 cases (vs 6,6 78 on 3 September, 4,339 on 5 August; 926 on 9 July; and 287 on 10 June), including 224 deaths (vs 206 on 3 of September, 84 deaths on 5 August; 12 deaths on 9 July and 4 deaths on 10 June) since the onset of the outbreak. Of confirmed cases, 75 per cent are adults within the age range 21-50 years, with 45 per cent being female and 55 per cent male. After a decline in weekly incidence risk from 7.6 in week 31 (26 July-1 Augustus 2020) to 3.7 in week 33 (9-15 Augustus 2020), the weekly incidence risk increased to 4.4. in week 34 (16- 22 Aug 2020). The Incidence rate has continued to decline to 3,18 in week 35 but however increased again to 3.53 in week 36. As of 13 September 2020, the six provinces Harare, Bulawayo, Matabeleland South, Midlands, Mashonaland East and Manicaland account for 89 per cent of all confirmed COVID-19 cases in Zimbabwe.

  • It has been observed that there has been continued declining access and utilization of essential services including preventive, curative and rehabilitation services across the country. Furthermore, outpatient consultation declined by 36 per cent in 2020 (April - July) compared to same period in 2019. For maternal health services, at least 4th Antenatal visit declined by 45 per cent in 2020 (April -July) compared to same period in 2019.

  • On immunization services, the proportion of districts reporting at least 80 per cent routine immunization coverage with Penta3 declined from 90 per cent in December 2019 to 59 per cent by end June 2020.

  • Several programmes implementing initiatives to overcome identified challenges such as integrated outreach activities.

  • There has been relaxation of lockdown restrictions and this came with the revision of quarantine measures as well as opening of schools.

  • Laboratory testing: Average daily laboratory tests in Epi week 36 (16-22 Aug) 862 down from peak of 1, 575 achieved in Epi week 33. Proportion of PCR positive in Epi week 36 was 9 per cent compared to 10 per cent in Epi week 33.

Response

  • Continue to strengthen COVID-19 public health capacities as lockdown measures continues to be relaxed. These include laboratory testing, surveillance strengthening, infection prevention and control in health facilities and community, risk communication and community engagement.

  • Particular attention is to continue to strengthen response capacity in provinces that continue to report high numbers of new COVID-19 cases particularly Harare .

  • Essential Health Services: Follow up on priorities regarding HRH, PPE, Logistics discussed with GOZ/MOHCC leadership.

  • Support and monitor programme initiatives to mitigate identified challenges including integrated outreach activities .

  • Supporting COVID-19 Intra action review (IAR) which seeks to document experiences and collectively analyze the ongoing in-country response to COVID-19 during period February-August 2020 through identifying achievements, challenges, best practices, and opportunities. The IAR will also make recommendations to improve the COVID-19 response in Zimbabwe by sustaining/scaling up best practices and resolving identified challenges and weakness. From this exercise, the Ministry and health partners also intend to use lessons learned from COVID-19 response to enhance health system strengthening including IHR core capacities as well as enhancing access to quality, comprehensive essential health services. Risk Communication and Community Engagement: 162,000 users of COVID-19 information hub (as of 3 September and 7.68 million messages exchanged .

  • An adapted Risk Communication and Community Engagement Field Guide has been finalised to guide implementation of subnational RCCE interventions. Meanwhile, plans are on course to conduct a Risk Communication, Behaviour and Social Change workshop from 14 to 18 September, targeting 320 Inter-faith and community leaders. The leadership is expected to coordinate the COVID-19 interfaith response across the country, working with district Health Promotion and Environmental Health teams.

  • Community engagement activities are ongoing. 23,710 individuals were reached through numerous activities including roadshows, health education sessions, handwashing and mask up campaigns and door-to-door information dissemination in Matabeleland South. 1,860 individuals were reached in Midlands including 873 mothers through at handwashing campaign at Kwekwe hospital. 5,000 COVID-19 IEC materials were distributed in Matabeleland North and 1000 individuals were reached through workplace sensitization activities. 3,877 individuals were reached through a handwashing campaign in Mashonaland Central.

  • 30 slots have been secured on Diamond FM in Mutare to cover topics including: risk perception, social distancing, testing, isolation, quarantine, and gatherings.

  • Capacity building of front-line health workers continue with support from partners- AICAZ, RTSL, UNICEF, UNFPA, WHO, World Vision and Save the Children among others.

  • Training for Ambulance crews was completed this week after Mashonaland West and Central were covered, bringing the total of trained ambulance staff to 526 for the whole country.

  • Repair and servicing of government ambulance units across the country is progressing and is expected to revitalize the referral system including increased capacity for COVID-19 referral. A detailed report will be included in subsequent updates.

  • A consignment of 2,000 pulse oximeters procured through HDF support have been received in the country. The equipment will be distributed to all districts covering the primary level of care and will provide capacity for home/community monitoring of COVID-19 patients.

  • World Bank/ZIRP supported reassessment of hospitals in Manicaland Province.

Gaps

  • The increase in local transmission is contributed by: delayed case detection due to gaps in surveillance, contact tracing and quarantine of contacts; gaps in isolation of confirmed cases; and sub-optimal implementation of infection prevention and control practices in health facilities, crowded institutions such as prisons, education facilities.

  • Priorities include: (1) New MOHCC leadership/GOZ leadership: Advocacy efforts regarding health workers, logistics, PPE, transparency and accountability, remove to barriers to access to care including requirement for COVID-19 testing; (2) Consistency quality of COVID-19 response: Support to pillars and front line responders to document factors contributing to performance of COVID-19 priority activities; Documentation and dissemination of best practices; (3) Laboratory testing: In-depth reviews to address the long delays in release of results; ensure continued attention on regular and reliable inventories and close follow up with supplies ordered but not yet received; (4) Essential health services: Support to timely implementation of proposed rapid assessment to get most updated data; support efforts to address health worker concerns on occupational safety and health .

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Nutrition

606K
people targeted
544,143
children screened in 25 districts in July

Needs

  • An estimated 95,000 children under age 5 are at risk of wasting. According to the February 2020 Zimbabwe Vulnerability Assessment Committee (ZIMVAC) rapid assessment, global acute malnutrition (GAM) prevalence has increased from the 3.6 per cent (ZimVAC rural 2019) to 3.7 per cent at national level with the drought prone provinces of Masvingo and Matabeleland North and South most affected.. The country has seen pockets of increased cases of malnutrition particularly in Epworth ,Gutu , Binga, Hwange and Mutare urban and rural districts. The hot spots remain a concern and are closely monitored. Of particular concern is an expected increase in child malnutrition, including wasting, due to steep declines in household incomes, changes in the availability and affordability of nutritious foods, and interruptions to health, nutrition, and social protection services resulting from the impact of the COVID-19 lockdown. According to recent global estimates, the current situation would lead to an additional 14,250 children being malnourished in Zimbabwe due to increased food insecurity.

  • The nutrition status of children in Zimbabwe is further compounded by already existing sub-optimal infant and young child feeding practices including very poor dietary diversity at 15 per cent and with only 7 per cent having attained the minimum acceptable diet.

  • The number of pellagra cases reported has continued to increase in Zimbabwe. As per routine data, 1,258 pellagra cases were recorded between January to July 2020, which is double compared to the 667 cases over the same period last year (DHIS2, Aug 2020). Following increases from 88 pellagra cases in March to 141 cases in April, 224 in May and 248 in June, 169 cases were reported for July 2020. The numbers of pellagra cases are likely to continue to increase as food insecurity in the country deepens and household income for accessing diversified diets continues to be depleted by the impact of COVID-19 lockdown and economic crisis.

  • Due to the drought-induced food insecurity, the majority of the households in the country require food assistance to facilitate adequate dietary intake and prevent deterioration of the nutrition status of children, women and other vulnerable groups like the disabled. Already nationally 56 per cent of women consume less than five groups of recommended foods .

  • The Nutrition Cluster has recommended treatment of child wasting as the most critical life-saving intervention for the nutrition humanitarian response. Active screening of children under age 5 for wasting has continued in the current COVID-19 lockdown following adoption of family and mother led mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) which aims at limiting the risk of infection by community health workers involved in screening and yet providing the much needed early identification and referral of children with wasting to health facilities to access treatment of acute malnutrition. In August 2020, a total of 472,117 children were screened for acute malnutrition with 89 per cent of the children being screened at community level in the 25 nutrition intervention priority districts. Of the children screened in August 2020, 515 were admitted for treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) and 223 were admitted for treatment of severe acute malnutrition (SAM). Nationally, 11,976 children were admitted for treatment of SAM between January and Aug 2020. From June to July, the numbers of children decreased from 1,556 to 1,302 consecutively showing a similar trend to what was seen in same period in the past 3 years which is experienced after the harvest season. The Nutrition Cluster is prioritizing the improvement of the quality of care provided in the Outpatient Therapeutic Programme (OTP) and inpatient stabilization centers owing to the continuous mentorship and capacity building of health workers.

Response

  • Approximately 5,175 village health workers were trained on active screening and consistent with the improved capacity was an increase in admissions of children with acute malnutrition. Additionally, 1,247 health-care workers have been trained on integrated management of acute malnutrition (IMAM) in April, May, and June 2020 to support improved quality of care for malnourished children. In addition, 217 lead mothers were trained on infant and young child feeding (IYCF) in Chiredzi increasing the number of community volunteers leading mother care groups. More health care workers and community health workers are still being capacitated to support the emergency response.

  • The Pediatric Association of Zimbabwe (PAZ) is developing remote training materials aiming at strengthening the capacity of health workers and clinicians working in hard to reach areas through the e-learning platform.

  • Promotion of appropriate IYCF and care practices in the context of the COVID-19 emergency is ongoing with support of nutrition partners, namely ADRA, GOAL, Save the Children, Nutrition Action Zimbabwe (NAZ), Organization for Public Health Interventions & Development (OPHID) and World Vision. In August 2020, a total of 264,690 pregnant and lactating women and caregivers of children under age 2 were reached with counselling support and an estimated 2 million people have been reached through the nine episodes of the radio show “Live Well: The Health and Nutrition Show” on topics related to nutrition, health and HIV in the context of COVID-19.

  • The micronutrient supplementation of Vitamin A reached 664,397 children from 6-59 months (65 per cent of the cluster target on Vitamin A supplementation) for 2020. Vitamin A coverage is expected to improve with the strengthening of integrated community outreach services in all districts in the country.

  • The RapidPro SMS reporting, an innovation of UNICEF in conjunction with the MoHCC was initiated in April 2020 and is operational in 25 targeted districts and two acute malnutrition hotspots with districts reporting on weekly basis on seven high frequency nutrition indicators.

  • Following, the ZIMVAC 2020 seasonal assessment, with field data collection across rural settings conducted during the period 10 to 21 July, with the aim of measuring food and nutrition security situation and the socio- economic impact of COVID-19. Data analysis and report writing will be completed by end of September and the report shared with all stakeholders.

  • The Ministry of Health and Child Care, together with partners WFP, UNICEF, UNAIDS and ILO, continues strengthening integration and dissemination of health and nutrition messages to the public using a coordinated approach.

  • WFP in collaboration with UNICEF and MoHCC continued providing the emergency response for screening for acute malnutrition. The Preventive rations will be discontinued from July 2020 until next lean season.

Gaps

  • The Nutrition cluster funding for the HRP 2020 response activities has remained at $3.6 million against the $24.6 million required.

  • The Nutrition Cluster has noted knowledge gaps in Nutrition programing in the context of the COVID-19 pandemic and in nutrition messaging for National partners, community, and facility-based health workers.

  • Inadequate supplies of personal protective equipment (PPE) for the community volunteers and supervisors implementing nutrition in emergencies life-saving activities continues to be a gap posing a challenge for the implementation of the nutrition lifesaving interventions. The market demand for PPE is much more than the supply and UNICEF continues to follow-up on supplies ordered.

  • Due to the high demand of MUAC tapes for family led MUAC screening, some mothers have not yet received MUAC tapes which is hindering the progress of the programme. More than 10,000 packs of MUAC tapes have been ordered and are in the pipeline and none have been received in the past 6 months. Lack of transport, as well as travel and movement restrictions, fear of contracting COVID-19 infections, and prioritization of emergency life- saving interventions over routine critical nutrition services are eroding the gains made over the years.

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Protection (Child Protection)

422K
people targeted
53,064
children reached w/psychosocial activities

Needs

  • There is stigmatization of families including children who have infected COVID-19 members once the rapid response team is sighted by community members at a household.

  • Transportation challenges for clients to report and seek services, in addition to inaccessibility of health service due to strikes or infection of health care staff, are resulting in survivors of violence failing to access post rape care in health facilities as child protection partners need to contact private doctors to receive care for clients.

  • There is a need for advocacy for waiver of access fees for children, adolescents and young mothers when accessing antiretroviral medication.

  • There is limited access to justice for clients who need to attend court as they are turned back at roadblocks by security personnel despite the fact that they are producing the required court documentation that ought to facilitate their presence in court for the hearing of their cases including sexual violence and abuse cases (SGBV).

  • The closure of the Registrar’s General Office which currently has very few staff working has resulted in challenges and delays in the age determination for children in conflict with the law who do not have birth certificates who have to remain in detention until it can be confirmed that they are minors.

  • Quarantine measures have placed new stressors on parents and caregivers as a result of children’s prolonged stay at home due to school closure and loss of livelihood due to COVID-19 induced economic challenges.

Response

  • Since January 2020,60,247 children, including 7,560 children with disabilities (46 per cent boys and 54 per cent girls) and children who have family members infected with COVID-19, have benefitted from structured child protection and psychosocial support (PSS) activities. Child Protection Society (CPS) working with the Ministry of Public Service, Labor and Social Welfare (MoPSLSW) has provided tracing and reunification services to 523 unaccompanied and separated children (UASC) with 167 children who were previously living on the streets and 166 children referred by Department of Social Welfare (DSW) from quarantine facilities at the borders being reunified. During the reporting period, the Child help line received 408 calls with 52 per cent SGBV and Violence against Children (VAC) related cases and 31 per cent of these reported cases involving girls. The perpetrators of the sexual violence were either the survivor’s community member or a relative and the violent episodes took place in the girl’s home, in a public area or in the house of a relative or neighbor.

  • To address the challenges that parents, and caregivers are facing during COVID-19,4 radio programmes which are part of the, "Live Well: Parenting in COVID-19 Series" were aired on SKYZMETRO FM at 11:30 a.m. The radio sessions are aimed at dissemination of positive parenting messaging to foster child protection and resilience in the face of COVID-19 which include interactive sessions with live call ins and WhatsApp messaging. The radio broadcasts covered various topics on the impact of COVID-19 on teenagers including teen pregnancies and child marriage SGBV, aired on 1,3, 8 and 10 August.

  • Child protection partners continue to work towards ensuring that services are accessible to their clients despite the challenges including:

  • Hiring minivans that are used to transport survivors of violence to ensure they have access to post rape care and for ongoing capacity building initiatives where training participants are provided with transportation in areas where public transport is not available.

  • Increase in airtime for staff for continued provision of psychosocial support, remote follow ups and facilitation of case referrals and procurement of PPE.

  • The MoPSLSW continues to provide support to Child Protection partners who are experiencing challenges at security roadblocks with letters at both Provincial and District level to facilitate the continuity of essential Child Protection and GBV services, including case management and provision of Mental and Psychosocial Support (MHPSS) for children and vulnerable communities and access to justice.

  • To facilitate the release of children in detention who do not have birth certificates Magistrates are applying the Provision in the Criminal Procedure and Evidence Act that allows them to estimate the age of children which has facilitated court rulings and the eventual release of these children.

Gaps

  • There is a lack of COVID-19 related information in accessible formats for persons with disabilities, especially for the deaf and hard of hearing, and the blind or partially blind people.

  • Due to the time take to get past security checkpoints child protection partner staff are getting late and sometimes only manage to get to court after the proceedings have been concluded which makes it impossible for them to provide the required support to clients including survivors of sexual violence and abuse cases (SGBV). Child Protection partners have reported the existence of unauthorized roadblocks being set up an issue that has been taken up by the MoPSLSW for discussion with the Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) as it prevents continued delivery of essential Child Protection and GBV services.

  • Service delivery is challenged by lack of adequate PPE as the crisis continues taking into consideration that CP services cannot always be delivered at 1.5 metre distance hence surgical masks and gowns are needed for first line responders. and increased anxiety among staff for fear of infection in a context of poor health care.

  • Quarantine facilities, residential care centres and other places of safety where children who were previously living on the streets and children returning from Botswana and South Africa have been placed, lack the bare minimum of basic services to maintain adequate personal hygiene, recreation and services to care for them. In addition, there is a lack of non-food items with specific items to cater for the needs of infants in support of mothers with children under age 2 in quarantine facilities.

  • Child protection has only received 8 per cent funding of the total $9.6 million that is required. Without this funding, partners continue to face challenges in ensuring the mental health and well-being of all frontline workers.This includes access mental health and psychosocial care, provision of recreational materials for use by children in quarantine facilities, addressing stigma, additional vehicles to facilitate the movement of clients and procurement of adequate PPE to ensure COVID-19 prevention measures are adhered to when conducting home visits for critical cases that cannot be followed up remotely. While partners acknowledge the need to fill this gap the lack of resources remains a limiting factor.

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Protection (Gender-based Violence)

845K
people targeted
109,141
pple reached w/GBV risk mitigation & resp.

Needs

  • Risks of gender-based violence continue to intensify in scale and scope while the population is exposed to degenerating food insecurity, compounded by economic hardship and the COVID-19 movement restriction measures.

  • The national GBV Hotline (Musasa) has recorded a total of 4,615 GBV calls from the beginning of the lockdown on 30 March until 15 July (1,312 in April, 915 in May 2020, 776 in June, 753 in July, 766 in August and 148 from Set 1 to 9 September), with an overall average increase of over 60 per cent compared to the pre-lockdown trends. About 94 per cent of the calls are from women. In the last three months, an increase in psychological violence was recorded (55 per cent of total cases) as compared with previous months. Other dominant forms remain physical violence (22 per cent of total cases) followed by economic violence (15 per cent) and sexual violence (8 per cent). About 90 per cent of cases are intimate partner violence.

  • Increased concerns of exposure to gender-based violence continue to be recorded at points of entry, because of the increasing afflux of returnees and unavailability of protection sensitive quarantine facilities to host them.

  • Stigmatization at Points of entry as well as at quarantine facilities continues to be a concern, because of the increased number of national cases and the resulting fear of infection in host communities. Furthermore, because of increased “border jumping” and smuggling in persons, exacerbation of exposure to Sexual exploitation and abuse is expected on the increase. Instances of retaliation against community members who report illegal migration have been recorded.

  • Priority needs include availing NFIs that ensure dignity of the most vulnerable, psychosocial support as well as disseminate critical information on available GBV multi-sectoral services. The needs for sensitization of quarantine centers personnel on the establishment of complaints mechanisms, psychologic first aid and GBV referral pathways remains critical.

  • Despite GBV services being recognized as essential services within the new lockdown phase, movement restrictions are still faced by GBV survivors in some districts, where there are reports of harassment at roadblocks and requests for unnecessary passes for survivors trying to access essential GBV services. The need for continuous sensitization of security personnel deployed at roadblocks on freedom of movement of GBV staff and survivors remains critical.

  • Reduced public transport availability remains a challenge in urban, peri-urban, and rural areas for survivors of GBV to access timely multisectoral services. In most impoverished areas, de-prioritization of GBV services is increasingly recorded because of the protracted lockdown, as access to daily income sources for household sustenance remains constrained.

  • Service providers have reported an increase on the number of GBV cases against adolescent girls, as well as exposure to increased negative copying mechanisms, such as child marriage, as one of the indirect consequences of the protracted closure of schools compounded by economic hardship and household income reduction. Increase in teenage pregnancies is also often identified among the consequences.

  • The curfew measures continue to impact on the reduction of service availability, as multi-sectoral service providers have reduced timeframes to avoid security incidents for survivors moving after 6 PM. While the endorsement of the new curfew regulations (extended at 8 PM) was introduced on 17 August, this further generates uncertainties and fear among communities, and risks of decreased service uptake.

  • Some GBV sub-cluster partners have reported increasing requests at roadblocks for COVID-19 negative testing proof as a prerequisite to allow mobility of service providers. There is need for clarity on the protocol of mandatory testing for essential service providers, to ensure timely availability of lifesaving GBV services.

  • The legal sector is constrained in some districts, e.g. in Kotwa/ Mudzi district there is no resident magistrate and legal services are only available once a month. The closest alternative center for rape cases legal assistance is the regional court in Murehwa, which is 130 km away from the growth point and further away from rural residents. These challenges generate delays in cases management and discourages some survivors to report, as well as witnesses to support survivors of rape.

  • The Health sector crisis continues to impact on accessibility of Clinical management of rape services. While mobile OSCs teams continue to receive constant support by dedicated nurses, the strike of health personnel in static facilities indirectly generates reduced capacity to assist rape victims with life-saving treatment. Furthermore, some partners report that Health services are turning down patients due to increased fears of local COVID transmission, with serious consequences on timely access to lifesaving health treatments, including chronic illness, maternal health, and post rape.

  • As a result of the compounded challenges (transport, curfew, reduced health personnel at static Health facilities) mobile Service providers are recording an increased demand, which they are counterbalancing through doubling the capacity of multi-sectoral staff on the ground, in order to ensure continuation of services for a larger number of survivors in hotspots.

Response

  • Since 1 January 2020, the GBV sub-cluster partners have assisted 113,953 individuals (44,153 male, 69,800 female) with community-based GBViE risk mitigation and PSEA outreach, integrated in various community-based mechanisms and with the support of a workforce of 225 community volunteers, including behavior change facilitators. In addition, 7,969 women and girls were reached with community-based PSS interventions, including at W/G safe spaces, and 9,487 GBV survivors (7,472 female, 2,015 male) were assisted with multisectoral GBV services, through mobile one- stop centers (OSC).

  • GBV Sub-Cluster partners with Support from UNFPA continue to work closely with the Ministry of Women affairs, Community, Small and Medium Enterprises Development, to address GBV staff clearance and to ensure freedom of mobility for GBV survivors seeking support during the lockdown.

  • The mobile service provision model continued to enhance service uptake in areas where public transport remains unavailable. GBV Sub-cluster partners continue to coordinate their efforts with the Food Security and WASH clusters partners, for the setup of mobile OSCs and safe spaces near food distribution points and community boreholes. The Mobile OSCs teams have strengthened their interaction with Zimbabwe Republic Police (ZRP) and the Victim Friendly Units (VFU) to ensure timely referrals of GBV survivors at points of entry and in areas nearby quarantine facilities.

  • GBV community surveillance and mobile service providers have also strengthened their presence at food distribution points, mining areas, water points, permitted community gatherings, contributing to increased availability of safety nets, complaints mechanisms and timely referrals to GBV services in critical hotspots.

  • Alternative transport fees support to survivors, including those with disabilities and their caregivers, also continues to facilitate access to services.

  • Access to data bundles and airtime for community facilitators engaged in GBV surveillance continued to be supported to ensure direct interaction with hotlines operators and continuous timely referrals.

  • Digital messages on GBV during COVID-19 continue to be disseminated through social media and radio (the Let’s talk GBV radio programme is airing every Saturday at 11 AM live on Capital FM and social media platforms), with a particular focus on domestic violence, PSEA, the GBV referral pathway, SGBV reporting within 72 hours in order to access Post Exposure Profilaxis (PEP). On 28 August, as part of the World Humanitarian Day celebrations, the “Let’s talk GBV” Radio programme was dedicated to the male engagement for GBV risk mitigation.

  • The GBV Sub-cluster, under the overall technical guidance of UNFPA, continued to collaborate with IOM and the Points of Entry pillar to ensure the integration of GBV risk mitigation and response, and PSEA into the SOPs and training modules for the quarantine facilities staff trainings continued during the reporting period.

Gaps

  • The full re-operationalization of GBV facilities continues to face challenges related availability of basic PPE and delayed delivery of COVID-19 IPC supplies.

  • Underfunding remains a critical barrier to the achievement of GBV SC targets, with only 7 per cent of the HRP requirements funded, while the COVID-19 interventions are currently ongoing only through re-programming of other existing funding, and with less than 5 per cent of requirements met.

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Cluster Status

Water, Sanitation and Hygiene (WASH)

2.7M
people targeted
2.3M
people reached

Needs

  • Over 3.7 million people are in need of WASH support under the 2020 Humanitarian Response Plan, along with 7.3 million people in need, under the COVID-19 Addendum. Under the HRP, partners are targeting more than 4 million people across rural (77 per cent) and urban (23 per cent) areas, while under the COVID-19 Addendum, partners are targeting an additional 2.1 million people.

  • Access to safe water in rural areas remains a challenge with only 30 per cent of the 55,709 water sources tracked by the Rural Water Information Management System (RWIMS), providing water from a protected source.

  • According to the Zimbabwe National Water Authority (ZINWA), the national dam level average as of 16 July was at 46.4 per cent, while the average levels for this time of year are usually 68.8 per cent. Dams that supply Bulawayo City are at just 25.6 per cent capacity and there is a deficit of 17 million litres of water per day for the city’s residents. Plumtree Town council water source, Mangwe Dam that supplies more than 6,000 residents with water is drying up and its levels are at around 35 per cent). Flows in major rivers have significantly declined, with no flows in Runde, Gwayi and Mzingwane Rivers. These shortages also affect hydropower generation, which in turn affects urban water supply and treatment and causing water rationing which impacts people’s ability to maintain good hygiene practices.

  • In Matabeland South, Mashonaland East and West, Masvingo, Harare and Matabeleland South Province boreholes and shallow wells are reported to be drying up due to the ongoing drought. At the same time, the number of boreholes that are breaking down are increasing as communities lack funds and support to repair them.

  • An outbreak of diarrhoeal disease is under control in Luveve, Bulawayo, with 2,005 cases and 12 deaths reported as of 24 Aug. The cumulative figures for typhoid as of 2 August are 700 cases and 10 deaths, while for diarrhoea the cumulative figures are 191,081 cases and 92 deaths, across all Provinces.

  • With more than 7,500 cases of COVID-19 cases as of 14 September, there is an urgent need to ensure all HCFs have adequate WASH services and IPC measures in place. There is also an increasing risk that some WASH services may be discontinued where WASH Sector staff fall sick or undergo self-isolation/quarantine.

  • Parirenyatwa, Chitungiwza and Harare Hospital currently have no incinerators and the accumulation of medical waste poses a serious health hazard to the staff and patients of these facilities. A further five new incinerators are required by the Harare City Health Department, while five more need rehabilitating in order to manage the city’s solid waste effectively. According to RWIMS, 44 per cent of rural health facilities do not have functioning incinerators, while 3.5 per cent have no functioning toilets and 12 per cent have no handwashing facilities.

  • From an assessment of quarantine centres undertaken by IOM and WHO, only 62 per cent of centres have running water, while only 40 per cent of handwashing stations had soap. About 57 per cent of centres were not following routine cleaning and disinfection of surfaces and PPEs were lacking. The identification of new quarantine centres has been challenging after schools used as quarantine centres were closed. In five provinces, 20 new centres have been identified but all require significant rehabilitation. Urgent attention is required to identify and address the specific WASH-related IPC needs in new and existing centres.

  • A total of 165 schools across 10 provinces have been prioritized as needing new boreholes by the MoPSE. According to RWIMS, 53 per cent of schools have no existing handwashing facilities and 21 per cent of schools have no safe sanitation facilities.

Response

  • HRP partners have reached a total of 452,637 people with access to safe water. A total of 127, 771 people have been assisted with hygiene items through the distribution of hygiene kits.

  • HRP COVID-19 partners have reached 1,944 people with handwashing and over 2,4 million people have been reached with hygiene promotion messaging through mobile and community campaigns.

  • Government and partners have also constructed over 23,000 handwashing stations across the country in institutions, marketplaces, and communities.

Gaps

  • There has been no change in funding during the past two weeks for the WASH Cluster’s HRP with only 3 per cent ($1.8 million) of the funding being realized. For the COVID-19 response, funding remains at 13.6 per cent ($983,086). Significant gaps across all areas of the WASH response remain due to the lack of funding.

  • Although 2.3 million people have been reached with WASH activities under the HRP and COVID response, this is predominately through mass media hygiene campaigns, and 1.6 million of the people reached with hygiene are in just 5 Districts: Harare (889,000 people reached), Gweru (108,840), Chimanimani (107,777), Mutare (417,000) and Mutare Urban (147,000). Over 3.7 million people in 49 of the 85 targeted Districts have not received essential messaging for COVID-19 and other key public health risks.

  • Under the HRP and COVID-19 response, just 16.7 per cent of the 2.3 million targeted with access to safe drinking water have been reached, leaving 1.9 million people in 20 of the 35 targeted Districts with no support at all.

  • For hygiene kits under the HRP and COVID-19 response, just 12.6 per cent of the targeted 939,650 people have been reached and more than 164,000 hygiene kits are still required for 821,400 of the most vulnerable people. Just 19 out of 66 targeted Districts have received support with 47 Districts remaining.

  • Only 10 per cent of the targeted health facilities have been reached in just 3 of the targeted 35 districts. 268 targeted health care facilities still have no identified partner to provide support with institutional hygiene kits including soap, cleaning materials disinfectants and PPE.

  • 165 schools require new water sources while 785 schools need institutional hygiene kits before reopening.

  • Waste management in health care facilities remains a challenge due to a lack of waste disposal vehicles, fuel, and incinerators. PPE equipment in health care facilities and quarantine centres is in short supply. Fuel shortages, particularly for government agencies, is affecting the WASH Sector’s ability to implement activities across all Districts.

  • Under the HRP and COVID-19 response, just 16.7 per cent of the 2.3 million targeted with access to safe drinking water have been reached, leaving 1.9 million people in 20 of the 35 targeted Districts with no support at all.

  • For hygiene kits under the HRP and COVID-19 response, just 12.6 per cent of the targeted 939,650 people have been reached and more than 164,000 hygiene kits are still required for 821,400 of the most vulnerable people. Just 19 out of 66 targeted Districts have received support with 47 Districts remaining.

  • Only 10 per cent of the targeted health facilities have been reached in just 3 of the targeted 35 districts. 268 targeted health care facilities still have no identified partner to provide support with institutional hygiene kits including soap, cleaning materials disinfectants and PPE.

  • 165 schools require new water sources while 785 schools need institutional hygiene kits before reopening.

  • Waste management in health care facilities remains a challenge due to a lack of waste disposal vehicles, fuel, and incinerators.

  • PPE equipment in health care facilities and quarantine centres is in short supply. Fuel shortages, particularly for government agencies, is affecting the WASH Sector’s ability to implement activities across all Districts.

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Sector Status

Migrants/Returnees

15,776
returned migrants (as of 19 August)

Needs

  • As of 13 of September, a total of 18,459 migrants (15,776 on 19 of August, 10,808 on 7 July; and 6,892 on 9 June), have returned to Zimbabwe from neighbouring countries through ten main Points of Entry (PoEs), namely Beitbridge, Plumtree, Kazungula, Victoria Falls Land border, Victoria Falls airport, Chirundu, Forbes, Sango, Nyamapanda and Harare airport, since the onset of COVID- 19 and the imposed restrictive measures, due to the socio-economic impact of the pandemic, the lack of access to livelihoods and support from host governments.

  • Most returnees arrived through the three points of entry of Beitbridge border post (8,969), Plumtree (3,641), and Harare International airport (4,359). The number of reported returnees continues steady approaching rapidly to a total of 20,000 arrivals in the next coming weeks with inclusion of those from northern countries such Zambia, Malawi, Tanzania, and Ethiopia.

  • As of 13 of September, 764 returnees (vs 989on 30 August) were still quarantined in centers operated by government, including 413 men, 271 women, 45 girls and 35 boys. Most returnees were quarantined in the four provinces of Harare (165), Matabeleland South (77), Manicaland (156) and Masvingo (97).

  • There is a significant decrease of people in quarantine centres, since under new Government regulations the mandatory 7-day quarantine period for returning migrants is no longer applicable. Migrants testing positive remain in isolation centres while those testing negatives are being quarantined at home. In addition, returning migrants already in quarantine centres who were quarantined for a longer period than 14 days and do not present COVID-19 symptoms are been discharged.

  • As a result of cabinet resolution returning migrants that avail their results with a negative COVID-19 certificate conducted in the previous 24hs from a recognize entity, will be allowed to proceed home for self-isolation.

  • With schools reopening and examinations taking place, there is an increase of minors returning to the country .

  • Community isolation centres are in the process of been identified following the increase of local transmissions, with communities struggling to isolate positive cases due to lack of housing space and capacity requiring support from the Government.

  • With the number of COVID-19 local transmission increasing there is a need to reinforced surveillance, contact tracing and community hygiene practices and health promotion, specifically in border communities, that are more exposed to border jumpers or cross border traders using informal channels.

Response

  • On 18 August, the Cabinet directed that migrants who are PCR negative on arrival or present a certificate of negative results from a recognize health entity will no longer be required to meet a 7 day mandatory quarantine period in Government facilities and allowed to self-quarantine at home with reviews conducted by the Rapid Response Teams in the locality.

  • IOM has set up an isolation facility within the Beitbridge border post, as well as Plumtree, Forbes Chirundu and Nyamapanda border posts, for real time separation of COVID-19 symptomatic travellers during entry screening within the POE. The facility will provide temporary holding and management before transfer to designated isolation facilities within the district.

Gaps

  • There is a need for increased testing for front line workers at POEs and personnel within the quarantine isolation centres, as well as to reinforce security and surveillance to avoid the spread of the disease.

  • Provision of livelihood support for the returnees after discharge from the quarantine facilities is increasingly needed to support the reintegration into receiving communities, and to avoid rejection, stigmatization, and social tension.

  • With the new COVID-19 context situation, its socio-economic impact of COVID-19, and significant figures of returning migrants arriving in Zimbabwe, there is a need to increase health education and behavioural change in receiving and border communities to increase hygiene practices, avoid stigmatization and increased fear to reintegrate returning migrants, and to improve community surveillance and detection of border jumpers and cross border traders using informal channels, to avoid the spread of the disease in border communities.

URL:

Downloaded:

Zimbabwe

Situation Report

Cluster Status

General Coordination

Needs

  • An emergency of this complexity and magnitude requires the close coordination of all stakeholders. The interaction with Government and frontline ministries, UN agencies and operational partners is vital in rolling out the multisectoral humanitarian support to complement Government’s interventions.

  • Continuous tracking of response progress, funding availability and resource capacity is key to ensure that critical gaps are identified and dealt with.

  • There is a need for increased coordination and information management under the government-led COVID-19 coordination structure with humanitarian and development partners, including communication of priority needs and gaps under the 10 pillars.

  • There is need for standardization and coordination of community engagement activities within the response to promote learning and ensure humanitarian standards are adhered to in the response.

Response

  • A Standing Cabinet Committee, under the stewardship of the Minister for Local Government and Public Works, is tasked with overseeing the Government’s response efforts and coordinates with the humanitarian partners through the office of the UN Resident Coordinator. At the technical and operational level, the Department of Civil Protection (DCP) coordinates the overall Government response with OCHA and UN cluster lead agencies, and interacts with Provincial and District administrations.

  • On 19 March 2020, the Zimbabwe National Preparedness and Response Plan for COVID-19 was launched with an initial eight pillars of coordination, the creation of a national COVID-19 Response Task Force and the formation of the Inter-Ministerial Committee. Overall high-level coordination and planning is led by the Permanent Secretary for the Ministry of Health and Child Care (MOHCC) working with permanent secretaries of other ministries in support of the Inter-ministerial COVID-19 Task force, with bi-weekly high level coordination meetings on Tuesdays in the Emergency Operations Centre and operational inter-pillar coordination meetings on Wednesdays. In June 2020, the Permanent Secretary for MOHCC was appointed as Chief Coordinator of the COVID-19 response in the Office of the President and the Cabinet. On 4 August 2020, a new Minister of Health and Child Care was appointed by the President, with a new Permanent Secretary (PS) for the Ministry appointed on 3 August. On 18 August, in order to strengthen the National COVID-19 response, the Cabinet decided to merge the COVID-19 response into a single response plan comprising the Command Centre, Office of the COVID-19 Chief Coordinator and Ministry of Health and Child Care.

  • On 17 July, a COVID-19 Addendum to the Zimbabwe Humanitarian Response Plan (HRP) was revised and updated integrating a multisectoral migrant returnees response, requiring $85 million to respond to the immediate public health crisis and the secondary impacts of the pandemic on vulnerable people. This is in addition to the $715 million required in the HRP. Zimbabwe has been included in the May July updates of the Global Humanitarian Response Plan (GHRP) as one of the countries requiring immediate support for prioritized COVID-19 interventions.

  • Humanitarian partners and donors meet monthly (and ad-hoc if necessary) under the Humanitarian Country Team (HCT), chaired by the UN Resident Coordinator. Individual sectors also meet on a regular basis and are chaired and co-chaired by the relevant line ministries and humanitarian cluster lead agencies. Inter-cluster coordination meetings take place bi-weekly chaired by OCHA, supported by a gender advisor, as well as coordinators for PSEA and community engagement since June 2020. Due to the COVID-19, all meetings are being held virtually.

  • A Community Engagement and Accountability (CEA) Technical Working Group was formed that will lead the implementation of identified priorities to strengthen community engagement and ensure that the needs of affected people are at the centre of response interventions.

Gaps

  • Critical funding gap hinders operational coordination of the response. As of 18 August 2020, the Financial Tracking System (FTS) reports that the overall Zimbabwe HRP is 18.9 per cent funded with $151.2 million, with an additional $12.7 million funded outside this plan. The plan’s main non-COVID-19 part is 18.1 per cent funded with $129.7 million, whereas the COVID-19 Addendum and input to the Global HRP (GHRP) is 25.4 per cent funded with $21.6 million.

  • Only 11 per cent of the total requested has been committed, and this critical funding gap hinders operational coordination of the response.

  • Continuity of coordination personnel/expertise is not assured, and this presents operational difficulty where frequent personnel turnover is required during the HRP time frame.

  • Despite that the nationwide lockdown to curb the spread of COVID-19 ensures the continuity of essential services, including humanitarian cluster activities, implementation and coordination have been constrained.

URL:

Downloaded: